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.Action ItemsACSOLCalifornia

International Megan’s Law (IML) Protest – July 27 in Oakland

Join California RSOL in protesting International Megan’s Law (IML), the law to prevent Registrant international travel, at the U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, July 27, 2016.

The government has filed a motion to dismiss our lawsuit against IML, the recently signed law by President Obama, to keep Registered citizens in permanent internal exile. The court hearing for that motion will be at 9:00 a.m. in Courtroom Three of Judge Phyllis J. Hamilton, 3rd Floor, 1301 Clay Street, Oakland, California, 94612.

We need as many of our supporters to fill the courtroom as possible to show the court, and America, that there are many Registrants, families of Registrants, and friends who suffer under the yoke of unconstitutional, ex-post-facto, punishment. The government’s travel notifications to foreign countries, its “unique identifiers” placed upon the passports of Registrants, as well as its requirements that Registrants provide the U.S. Government advance travel plans – under threat of imprisonment – amount to a complete ban on international travel for those on the Registry. These policies are already taking a terrible toll on those who, long ago, paid their debts to society. The Registry has become a continuously expanding regime of ever-escalating torment.

After the hearing, which will probably end by 10:00 a.m., there will be a rally in the plaza immediately outside of the courtroom in front of the entrance.

We expect to have media covering the event and Janice Bellucci, President of RSOL, and lead attorney for the lawsuit, will speak, along with other members and supporters of RSOL.

Please join us there! If you cannot, then please consider donating to California RSOL to help make our work in challenging this, and many other terrible laws, such as residence and presence restrictions, possible. Please also consider volunteering your time.

Thank you for your support! Please contact us at californiarsol.org with your questions or concerns or offers of assistance.

When: July 27, Hearing at 9:00 a.m., The rally begins at approximately 10:00 a.m. in the plaza in front of Court entrance.

Where: U.S. Federal District Courtroom 3, Judge Phyllis J. Hamilton, 3rd Floor, 1301 Clay Street, Oakland, California, 94612

Join the discussion

  1. Lake County

    Can anyone give me a ride down from Ukiah and back afterwards? Or can someone with money sponsor me for the cost to rent a car for 24 hrs and a little for some of the gas cost. I’m poor and without extra funds for costs to travel, but would like to support the group in being there. If not, maybe I can go next time needed.

    • HWY 101

      If i can break away from the office for a couple days, then I could potentially make this happen for you. I live in Crescent City, CA and am considering traveling to Oakland to support this cause. I’d be passing through Ukiah. (Heck, my office sits right on 101 in Crescent City)

      For this response i setup a throw-away cellphone number: 559-724-7699 which will be good for only a few days, or email me at nick@computer-hacker.net. I have whitelisted all email addresses to reach me for a few days as well.

      My only issue besides breaking away from the office is in justifying the cost of this trip. I have no money set aside for trips like this right now. I would have you back in Ukiah right after the event and i can find a remote location to camp, as i refuse to pay for hotel rooms.

      My rules are no smoking in my van and to roll the window down if you fart. That’s pretty much all I would ask.

      • Doc Martin

        If I lived in Cali, your humor alone would justify me riding with you & throwing you a few bucks for the trip

  2. Anonymous

    On probation, not allowed. No job. No money to give. Exactly as they want me. I am helping a little and there will come a time when my voice and actions will be loud and clear.

  3. Derek W Logue of OnceFallen.com

    I hope as many folks that can attend will go.

    July 27 just happens to be the 10 year anniversary for the signing of the AWA. Thus, this date is significant.

    • BA

      I will donate money as work as me stuck as usual end of month sales commissions so I can keep afloat. This is great wish I could show up.

      • Julia

        Will CA RSOL use donated funds to help people get to this event? I don’t feel comfortable sending money to individuals I don’t know, but would happily donate to a CA RSOL-managed travel fund.

        • Derek W Logue of OnceFallen.com

          I don’t know why these questions are in response to my comment since I haven’t asked for any donations.

  4. US Govt is a SCAM (Specificially CA)

    ^^ Same here anonymous right now under so called ‘restrictions’ but once gone Ill also speak LOUDLY !:) VERY Loudly and all over the place !

    • JohnDoeUtah

      What restrictions exactly? How does it prevent you from speaking or seeking redress of your grievences?

  5. Two States East

    Fly in to either OAK or SFO. Take BART to 12th St station in Oakland. Then only 3 block walk to courthouse on Clay.

  6. A

    I’m There!!! I discharge June 18th. Anyone needing a ride from Sacramento, hit me up.

    • Fedup

      Just curious, where in Sacramento are you? I’m in Rocklin. I know some one who is an SO whose name starts with A, I wonder if you’re him. We went to high school together if you are, but I doubt it.

      I don’t think my parole officer would let me go. She’d use that “can’t be around other s3x offenders” condition

  7. SoCalMomma

    I will be there with my family as well!! I discharge June 12th!!!

  8. Nicholas Maietta

    As normal, the timing is impeccable. Had I been living in Fresno still, the distance would be short enough.

    So far, there is an event i’m wanting to deal with from the 14th through 17th which is a few days after my trip to Redding in a couple days. I was HOPING to be able to leisuring travel over to Phoenix in show of support for something, but too many days would pass and I wouldn’t be able to safely travel AND deal with registration issues. THEN, i’d have to leisuring travel over to OAKLAND to attend this…

    Keeping in mind I also have a full work schedule.

    I really wish people wouldn’t pick OAKLAND as a place to protest. It’s a horrible city and there is a serious lack of law enforcement there. I would be very uncomfortable protesting publicly in a place like that.

    I wanted to attend the conference in Atlanta Georgia, but I don’t have enough time to save up and prep for it.

    It seems that as a registered citizen, I am unable to really attend the very things that affect me.

  9. Mike r

    what happens when you own a boat and leave the US without any particular destination.or if you’re going to another country just to get out of the United States but you don’t have any particular destination after your first stop?

    • Political Prisoner

      Let me know when and if you need a deck hand

    • PK

      I personally think a boat would be the best way to escape.

      • Rob

        A sailboat would be the only feasible option as they are cheaper then the kind of cruiser you would need to travel in the open ocean and the fuel on a cruiser would astronomical, not sustainable. Better become a darn good sailor and be able to handle a 30+ footer by yourself. The problem I see is you would have to pull into small harbors where their are no immigration agents. You can also live on the hook but you risk being questioned by local Navy’s/coast guards/ harbor masters. I’m sure in most places a small bribe to look the other way would suffice.
        Better yet buy a cheap boat, go sailing, abandon your own boat, fake your death and take a motorized dingy back to land and disappear : )

        • Lake County

          There is always Canada. Most of our border with Canada is not fenced or watched. Just ask any local in a US town just outside the border how to walk in unnoticed.

          • Erwin

            I love talking about Canada because I’ve traveled there many times plus I have relatives who are descendants of black loyalists living in Nova Scotia. The days of crossing the street from a town in Vermont into Quebec has long been over since 9-11. All check points are manned & the surrounding border remains under surveillance….infrared, motion detection, satellite, you name it. PLUS, getting caught sneaking into Canada could land you a 2 year prison sentence, then they’ll deport you back to America.
            Crossing via the Rockies is an option but you risk fatigue, exposure to cold, getting lost, and possibly death. I heard of boaters crossing Lake Ontario from Rochester into towns scattered along the coast north of Toronto. But I believe you have to check in with immigration, or the coast guard will be looking for you.
            When I was young bumming around the country with other young tramps in the early 90s, I had a friend who use to constantly travel into Canada by freight train. He took grain hoppers from Minneapolis straight to Saskatchewan without being caught. I’m sure authorities are more strict now. If a person did decide to sneak into Canada, have a gps, do it in a rural state like North Dakota or Montana, and have someone with a 4 wheel drive & gps waiting for you on the other side

          • Erwin

            Another thing I forgot to mention is Canada won’t let you in with any kind of record including the most minor dui offense. HOWEVER the country has a criminal rehabilitation process where a person is automatically considered “admissible” to Canada after they are 10 years offense free following incarceration & parole. Plus you must not have been sentenced for a serious felony that involved serving more than 10 years in prison. Now if one had a misdemeanor offense equivalent to a summary offense in Canada, then you only have to wait 5 years after sentence & parole conditions are met. I just laid out the conditions for automatic admissibility thru rehabilitation. However, after 5 years, any person can petition for rehabilitation and be admiited earlier than 10 years. Just need legal papers & fees to be filed by a Canadian lawyer or consolute. For now, Canada doesn’t straight out ban RCs like Mexico does unless someone on this forum can tell me differently. And I don’t see the unique identifier being a big issue with Canada as one can always use a passport card. Even though the identifier law affects cards, I can’t see officials splashing the words “sex offender” across the card. Info will probably be contained in the chip but I could be wrong. Good luck

        • PK

          That would make me a little nervous as I’m not an experienced Sailor by any stretch. The open ocean is a very big place, and there is no doubt that I would get lost within the first couple of days. I was thinking more along the lines of hitching a ride on a cargo ship, or a yacht perhaps.

  10. VAHall

    Priorities. We all have them. This is one of mine. See ya there.

  11. Lesley Shriver

    So happy to hear of the plans to protest and just wish there was some way we could be present. Hoping for a large turnout. Just got back from Jamaica yesterday and my husband who served his time over 10 years ago has no idea yet of this restriction. I just learned about it right before our trip and am still trying to find a way to break the bad news to him. Just hoping and praying this horrible restriction on civil liberties of those who have paid their dues will not be allowed to be enforced. I so wanted to stay in Jamaica far away from this insane system which is just inhumane.

  12. Matt

    Since the passing of IML, has anyone tried to travel overseas? I asked this at the New Mexico registration office. They said that SOs have successfully gone and returned from overseas trips, but I have my doubts. Would like to hear from others who have returned from a trip overseas…. Successfully or not.

  13. Pedro

    Janis

    I’m traveling to Paris for the first time with my wife, on July 26 through Aug 7.

    Am I to inform the government of my travels? when does this politically pathetic Obama law take affect. This will be the last time i travel out of the country and my passport expires next year.

    Thank you for your help and i will donate $100 to help brothers and sisters get to the court room through your donation site.

    • WantsToHelp

      There is much on this website in terms of anecdotal and non-legal advice within the international travel threads. There might be enough there to give you the answers you’re looking for, but asking Janice to speak specifically to the details of your situation is asking her to a) provide legal advice to someone who’s not her client b) on a public forum. This creates legal and ethical issues that most sane lawyers stay far, far away from. To get specific (not vague or generalized) answers to your particular legal question you have to contact a lawyer directly.

    • PK

      Greetings Pedro,

      You need to research this website and all of the blog posts that people have made over the past 6 months.

      By doing that you should find the answers to your questions:
      “Am I to inform the government of my travels? when does this politically pathetic Obama law take affect?”

  14. Joe

    So it has now been 127 days since President Obama signed this into law on Feb 8.

    Section 9 of the final bill requires that the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of State, and the Attorney General shall develop and submit to assorted congressional committees a process by which to implement the program specifically dealing with the passport identifier within 90 days.

    I believe Janice had stated that she attempted to receive this document at the end of the prescribed time frame. Is there an update on this?

    Is it possible that the government is and continues to break its own laws?

    Speaking of which – is there any news on the status on the lawsuit regarding the missing dates on the Megan’s Law web site? As we head into summer we are closing in on 6 (six) years!! that the CA DOJ is out of compliance on its own law.

    Anyone here ever got in trouble for registering a few days late? Sheeeesh.

  15. KP

    I just don’t fully understand this law. Why do they get to contact these countries and say they have reason to believe a crime will be committed? Based on what exactly? Some people who are on the Sex Offender Registry had one offense that is ages old. Not to mention passports aren’t just used to travel. When you get a new job you can use your passport, but I guess not anymore.

    • PK

      Everything you have mentioned has been discussed in great detail on several threads of this blog.

  16. 290air

    I think the US government and all governments in general should be more concerned with their own people committing these types of crimes as opposed to registered citizens. The people put in charge of providing humanitarian needs to these poor countries commit more atrocities than most of us have ever committed. Check out this bloomberg article from today.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-16/rape-scandal-of-un-peacekeepers-festers-as-reports-of-abuse-grow

  17. Jmg

    Does anyone know who we can call or how we can find out if we would be allowed into certain countries? Like can we call an embassy? Nobody seems to know and the last time I tried to travel I attempted to enter Mexico in October and was denied entry. I can’t seem to find any reliable info.

    • Lake County

      There is no reliable info. No official will tell you for sure. All you can do is read the travel experiences of others that have posted on this site.

  18. Rodney

    I’ve been registered since 1994 and have had no incidents with the legal system. The struggle has been to remain employed and housed. I have worked as a substance abuse counselor since 2000 and at age 61 and in poor health I find myself unable to afford the studio apartment I have lived in for 5 years. This month, June 2016 is the last month I can afford to pay the rent and I have exhausted myself looking for a low cost apartment to rent and over 55 apartments turn me down because I am registered. I have searched for sex offender housing guides to no avail. Many states have them but not California. I am about to be homeless. Does anyone know of sex offender housing assistance in California?

    • PK

      “I have exhausted myself looking for a low cost apartment to rent and over 55 apartments turn me down because I am registered.”

      Someone else characterized the fact that being a Sex Offender is the same as a “Social Death Sentence” and I would say they’re spot on.

      Especially in the United States. There is NO HOPE for ANYONE REGISTERED in the United States. I hereby renew my calls to GET THE F*** OUT OF THIS COUNTRY NOW!

      • Erwin

        Well, you won’t be able to do that under International Meagan’s Law. Especially if you turn up in a country with the word sex offender stamped on your passport. California already has an affordable housing crisis for non RSOs. So it’s definitely going to be harder for registered ones. If you plan on renting, I would go to a state like Oregon or Minnesota where they only list the most severe level “sexual predator.” Don’t know if California would keep your name listed if you transfer states. If that’s the case, your name would still be on the national registry. Property management agencies normally just check the state database, but some could check the national. If you have good credit, think about buying. It’s actually cheaper than renting here in the Midwest. The twin cities area has many housing options of buying apartments. If you do decide to go the homeless route, do it in Honolulu where they have no choice but to accommodate homeless.
        ……..don’t give up hope.

    • amom

      Rodney, how about trying to get into a sober home before you become homeless. So sorry….wish our state exercised our democratic views and humanity towards all human beings!

  19. O..A.R.

    This is why I will be protesting;

    I just watched a genealogy roadshow ( so I have boring viewing tastes…), anyway, a woman was being shown her German grandmother’s Nazi passport. There it was, the mark,a large red “J”! The commentator described it as the most obvious part of the passport besides the Swaztika. He also said it referenced a “dark period in human history.” I guess all we need now is to replace the American flag on our passports with the Nazi flag, and history will have repeated itself.

  20. O..A.R.

    One more tidbit. Commentator John Oliver made a good point. Letters do not affect our representatives. We must all call them to voice our displeasure in their actions. And call again…. and again…..and again. I have set aside 1 hour a month to call them all. If we all did thid. Just think about it.

    • PK

      I think your heart is in the right place, but really who has the time or inclination to do all of that- make repeated calls to some prick who doesn’t give a f*** about Sex Offenders in the first place?

      Perhaps you weren’t around on this blog last December, when everyone on this Blog wrote letters and made phone calls to their Representatives, in attempts to offer a sense of reason in that IML violates the Constitution. It was a real concerted effort.

      Guess what? Only a handful of Representatives even showed up to vote on the damn bill, which then passed the House of Representatives with flying colors.

      So you’re really preaching to the choir when it comes to attempting to rally the troops and urge everyone to make repeated phone calls to a bunch of jerks.

  21. Vicki Henry

    Women Against Registry (WAR) will be there…

    • MarkSF

      Thank you, Vicki!

      If you have colleagues in other advocacy orgs, hope you pass along the details for July 27 hearing and protest.

      Remember, it’s a hearing, and then a protest.

      Let’s try to meet there and introduce each other. Talk about outreach to advocacy individuals and orgs.

      • Timmr

        My flight arrives at 8:00 a.m., so I should just make it there in time, using the BART. How long do you think the protest will last? I would suggest many of us go out to lunch. Dinner? Any interest in that? I plan to leave that day in the afternoon, but I can change the return flight to later that evening.

      • Vicki Henry

        Hi Mark: I have done a protest after a court hearing and know you are not allowed to bring any signs, banners or cameras into the court house. I hope to be doing the same thing on July 12 in Las Vegas for the hearing in Judge Smith’s court on the Adam Walsh Act.

        I arrive in Oakland at 9:20 AM.

  22. Derek W Logue of OnceFallen.com

    I know of some individuals besides myself who would like to come but lack the funds to attend. Would anyone be willing to help them in that regard?

    • Timmr

      Due to the amount it costs to travel, I don’t know how much I can help, but if some others contribute, maybe together, we can help someone to attend. The outreach program I was involved in to get people to this event seems to have fizzled out, and I feel responsible for that not happening, but I would feel satisfied if I could help one other to attend.

      • PK

        I would rather attend the Court Hearing than some protest.

        Unfortunately I’m on the East Coast with no time to do anything.

      • HWY 101

        I would definitely break away to do this and bring another person (maybe more) if I can get fuel covered from Crescent City to Oakland and back. That’s about 720 miles.

        If you know something I don’t about getting financing together for this, i’m in. I am cash strapped at the moment.

        nick@computer-hacker.net or 559-724-7699

        • HWY 101

          I am still awaiting the person from Ukiah to reach out to me. Instead, maybe the team here can send an email to them letting them know I’m likely to attend and they need to reach me if they want a ride there and back.

          If not, i’m going anyway if at all possible.

          • Timmr

            How much do you figure your gas cost will run?

          • Lake County

            You email address will not work. I tried it twice after you posted it. Just gets returned. Thank you but I will not be attending. I stated why in an earlier post.

            • Brubaker

              Calling LakeCounty..calling LakeCounty..:) don’t get discouraged by some..you’re spirit & determination on team is something I like about you & part of the mix challenging injustice.
              If there is a hookup of transportation for LakeCounty as well as others here…
              Please offer that help anyone.. Thank you.

              • Nicholas Maietta

                I could easily do a pickup and dropoff in Lake County. It’s on my way, and not far at all from HWY 101.

            • Nicholas Maietta

              That is odd, because I whitelisted anyone to reach me. Just call my number if you want to reach me.

          • Timmr

            $100 for gas? I’ll give you a call or email. Now is HWY 101 and Nicholas one in the same?

  23. O..A.R.

    I am in Santa Clara county. I am going and have room for a couple of passengers if someone needs a ride.

  24. O..A.R.

    We can set a mtg. place since I don’t trust # or email sharing. Not this site, just never did in general. I’m sure that is a common trait with all of us.

  25. Derek W Logue of OnceFallen.com

    Anyone here already live in the Oakland area? I am getting there a little early and could use a tour guide.

  26. Pedro

    I will hopefully be in Paris for the first time with my wife, if they let me in????. Any news on getting into Europe, (France). Janice, is there a specific fund for helping. I will donate some money for both legal and ride help.

  27. O..A.R.

    Is anyone worried about exposure. I have anxiety about any possible confrontation.

    • Derek W Logue of OnceFallen.com

      I have engaged in numerous demonstrations, including leading the Rally in Tally, taking the fight to the Book family in their backyard, and I’d say the possibility of a “confrontation” is very low. In fact, you’d be amazed how many folks agree with us. The worse thing to happen to me so far was being sued by PFML.

      When you see demonstrations turn violent, remember that many of those were intended to start a fight, such as the recent skinhead protest in Sacramento. Also, when you see people get arrested, it is because they are engaging in acts of civil disobedience. We aren’t “Black lives Matter,” We’re not shutting down interstates or chanting we want dead cops or starting riots.

      The only thing we have to fear is fear itself. That’s what holds us back. Only a complete moron would try a violent act in front of a federal building.

      • Kris Klein

        I’m with you on on mounting protests in support of registrants but too many people are quick to compare our cause to other groups when its not the same. Black Lives Matter has their legitimate grievances too. I agree we registrants are oppressed by bad laws but the bottom line is its the result of our ACTIONS and situations we put ourselves in. BLM is protesting police mis treatment of blacks by police based on skin color. Thats something an individual cant control but they can control their actions. I think its kind of an insult to black registrants when racial obstacles they face is kind of trivialized by other registrants. Those obstacles are in fact real

        • Brubaker

          K.k. , you’re ‘bottom line’ is FarOff scale. Please look at the unfair third world type treatment on Free Americans as we are forced to sign into register our residence. How the f now does fundamental rights all of a sudden not applied Today …when we had them yesterday..??
          Treat All free citizens like every free citizen. That’s the bottom line .
          When freedom of speech, compelled or coerced is violated on one free citizen… Its a violation on all.
          As a free citizen to be treated like all free citizens afforded freedom of movement/travel is the bottom line.
          I’ve said before this iml can be shown as grossly unconstitutional.
          There are other major issues that can challenge this iml injustice and showcase this iml atrocity.
          I’m a Free Man….treat me and my friends as such. That’s the bottom line.

          • Kris Klein

            No Brubaker,

            The bottom line is what I said the bottom line is. People are on the registry as the result of their actions.

            You can claim I’m against fundamental rights, or I don’t believe registrants should have free movement of travel or whatever other type of bullsh_t red herrings you’re trying to throw at me. I never said all those things.

            My point is there’s a fundamental difference between penalties imposed on people convicted of a crime versus people penalized or discriminated solely because of their skin color.

            • Mike

              You said it. A penalty. An ex post facto penalty which is not constitutional. At least you recognize it. Many are on this registry as a result of a plea and some for crimes which do not predict a danger and thus no need for this identifier. You are correct that being earmarked as Jew by the Nazis was much more unjust, but this new law is not right either. This law was passed to prevent child sex trafficking and child sex tourism, this in spite of no data to support the need for this law. This was strictly a political “look at me” I am protecting children law which is expensive and without a demonstrated need.

              • Kris Klein

                It’s true that prosecutors sometimes force defendants into pleas to avoid trials. It happened to me but hey man! It doesn’t change the fact that I did the crime. My ACTIONS still brought me to the courtroom I would’ve just suffered a greater punishment if I didn’t take the plea and took it to trial
                We can discuss back an forth what’s not constitutional, political pandering by politicians, flawed studies, all those issues are important.
                But making quick comparisons with the causes of traditionally disenfranchised minority groups is a big turn-off. Especially to the very organizations (like the ACLU) who have traditionally helped other groups. And some RCs then wonder why these organizations don’t always take up our cause.

                Best way to get a sympathetic ear? First thing is to own up to your actions and stop with the false analogies

            • Brubaker

              C’mon krus klein, you’re not in a back hallway edit altering a court record. There is NO sentence in your original comment to that of your correction.
              Bottom line that.
              The fact you’re willing to accept further punishment, discrimination, involuntary servitude, prejudice and injustice because they force you to register to what is now proven to be lifetime parole conditions/punishment…..
              the bottom line is you’re willing to accept…..
              Allot of people here will not accept and thus challenge injustice….
              Do you see the history of people who challenge injustice..?
              That’s the bottom line .

              • Kris Klein

                You’re trying to build some straw argument and I don’t know why. I never said I’m willing to accept injustice discrimination, and punishment. Where did you get that from in my comment? Seems like you have a comprehension problem

                ONCE AGAIN, there’s a fundamental difference between penalties imposed on people convicted of a crime versus people penalized or discriminated solely because of their skin color. We shouldn’t be so quick to make comparisons with other groups.

                I never said registrants don’t face penalties, discrimination, and ongoing punishment. And that we shouldn’t wage a fight

        • David Kennerly

          You’ve reduced all of the reasons for being on the Registry down to one, very simplistic, explanation and then compared that grossly over-simplified conception to an equally simplified one of other great movements for justice.

          Further, it appeals to the uninformed and incurious and intellectually lazy segment of society (which is most of it) to dispose of an entire movement on the basis of your simplistic abstractions where it is used, most effectively, as a drop-dead conversation-stopper.

          It also presumes that society and its laws are uniformly rational and temperate and in the best interest of its citizens.

          • Kris Klein

            The only simplicit characterization I’ve seen is when too many registered offenders compare their cause to BLM or the 60s civil rights movement or even NAZI Germany. I know the registry is bad but like Goodwin’s Law says: the first one to invoke Nazi comparisons lost the argument. Comparisons also pretty much insult Jews who survived the holocaust

            Again, one kind of discrimination came about from one’s criminal action. Another kind came about from one’s skin color or religious ethnic makeup in the case of Jews.

            Sorry….that’s just the facts. That’s not appealing to the uninformed or lazy, it’s appealing to people who accept reality and take responsibility for their actions. I certainly do. So let’s not get silly

            • Margaret Moon

              Herr Klein, I can see some logic in your argument, however, some of the “crimes” that make one eligible for the unconstitutional rules, regs, and treatment being discussed are only a crime because the legislators made it so. For instance; consensual sex with an underage partner, or urinating in public (in some countries this doesn’t even raise eyebrows) or indecent exposure, at least some types… And in some districts the adorable pictures on your cell phone of your toddler swimming nude can get you in trouble. An attorney told me that some years ago looking at underage porn on the Internet did not buy you a stint in Federal prison either.
              The question of whether or not homosexuality is innate or a choice has never been scientifically settled but the legal system has stopped persecuting the LGBTQ community. And, finally, I would like to say that as the legal system has lost some of its former targets and cash cows with the end of the drug war and laws protecting the gay community, the sex offender has clearly become the substitute.

              • Kris Klein

                You’re absolutely right Margaret that American laws are draconian. I know of a case in my city where a student got a hold of the teacher’s cell phone that contained nude photos of children. Nothing pornographic. But the teacher was charged with felony possession and is now serving 4 years in prison. Our sex offense laws suck big time. Some states are worst the others. But I’m sorry to say that ignorance of the law doesn’t exist in the eyes of the courts.
                Now you did bring up something very important that no one else thought to bring up because they’re main goal is to fight me instead of my argument because I DARED to challenge long established posters on this forum.
                But anyways, being lesbian myself, I’m part of the LGBT community and I remember some southern states having sodomy laws on their books.
                But since the Supreme Court struck down a Texas sodomy law in 2003, all sodomy laws in all states are basically void. But you still have gay men convicted of sodomy crimes decades ago still on the registry. Now that would be an example of individuals unfairly being on the list because of who they are but it’s very rare & current law allows them to petition to have their name removed because of a defunct sodomy laws that no longer exist

            • Steve

              It’s easy to smell shit when you are in it…it’s even easier to wipe (your hands of it) just because you don’t like the smell of it. The penalty was the sentence at the time of conviction period. If your logic made any sense someone getting a dui in 1980 could be told today you can’t drive. That’s the type of law you would agree too? If one group is subject to ex post facto all should correct?

            • Timmr

              If you are talking about me, I make no one to one comparison between oppressed groups. That is not my point. I am trying to point out the patterns of tyrannical power. Yesterday the oppression may have been based on some concept of liberal “Jewish-ness” as Hitler described it, today it is based on some supposed inherent dangerousness of *ex offenders, the pattern is the same, the charcters have different faces, but what joins them is rule by fear and misinformation. Maybe we all would be better off if people were not turned off by the comparison between oppressed groups, and look less at the obvious differences, and more of the overlaps, joined together to fight a common enemy — abuse of power. As David Kennerly had pointed out recently, the US is now using IML as a model for notifications of other groups. You miss the concept of the forest by looking at the difference between trees.

              • Kris Klein

                Quite frankly, David Kennerly is wrong. It’s not good to make false comparisons to protected groups like gays, blacks, or women. In the case of registrants, their actions put them where they are. If there was no crime, there wouldn’t be no registry, no discrimination, no residency ordinance restrictions, no IML restrictions.
                On the other hand, traditionally protected groups face obstacles & discrimination simply because of their race, gender or sexual orientation. Not because of a choice they made to break the law
                The best way to turn off organizations that have traditionally helped protected classes is to walk into their office telling them as a registrant that you’re persecuted like the Jews in NAZI Germany. That won’t go over well at the ACLU or Center For Constitutional Rights

            • David Kennerly

              The problem with Godwin’s Law (not “Goodwin’s”) is that, while it is often true that the comparison being made to the Nazis is hyperbolic and absurd, not all comparisons are specious. For example, comparing the Turkish treatment of the Armenians or the Kurds to Nazism would be entirely appropriate, as would the treatment of the Tutsis by the Hutus or the Bosnian Muslims by the Serbs. In those instances, Godwin’s Law, which essentially asserts that the (Jewish) Holocaust was not only unique, but somehow irreproducible, in our times, fails. It can then be seen as a device for ridiculing and mocking real injustice and cruelty and, worse, sanctioning those cruelties derisively. In other words, it becomes an especially amoral tool for tyrants and those who would hold them unaccountable.

              In the case of sex offenders, who are not, after all, an homogenous group, there are certainly instances in which their treatment by the state can be compared to the cruelties of Nazism. Your willingness to dismiss these comparisons, out-of-hand, suggests you are unwilling to consider these claims individually and are inclined to dismiss them as a whole, which is to say, as an abstraction. That does make for a less complicated engagement with reality and may provide a salve for the conscience but it also results in a definite cognitive bias and unvarnished bigotry.

              The most salient distinction, in your mind, seems to be the acquisition of an original criminal conviction as the one thing that sets apart Registrants from those who are persecuted for intrinsic, and unchangeable, qualities.

              Let’s ignore for the moment the many laws created especially for Jews to stumble over as a means to legitimize their persecution and which starkly parallel many laws that have been placed before Registrants to ensure their permanent marginalization. In both cases, i.e. Jews In Europe and Registrants in today’s United States, have been “guilty” of breaking those laws.

              Still, let’s ignore that, for the sake of argument and say that Registrants are criminals and Jews were not. That may be true, but it overlooks the circumstances of the individual Registrant, how they came to be convicted, what they were convicted of and the legitimacy of some of those laws they were said to have broken or the justice with which they were prosecuted.

              Your view is that sex offenders, as a class, are undeserving of the same level of social regard that is extended to more legitimate persecuted classes.

              It’s not that you’re simply pointing out the distinction which, quite obviously, IS the prevailing view of society; you’re ADVOCATING for that view, too.

              That’s my problem with your position. You’ve over-simplified a complex tableau of individuals and circumstances, with varying outcomes for justice, and argued for why it should be so simplistically regarded.

              • Kris Klein

                You commit a crime, you lose certain rights. It’s always been that way, and it always will. In most states felons can’t vote or own a firearms. And of course if you’re on parole, your freedom of travel and 4th amendment rights diminish. There’s no “protected class” for criminals sorry to say. But there is a process (usually time) where rights are eventually restored. So should registrants have some of the same rights reserved for other traditionally protected classes? Of course they should. But they can’t expect immediate full rights due to the fact they committed a crime. They’re not the same as protected classes
                Armenian genocide by the Ottomans, or Hutu Tutsi genocide, are all fair game when compared to NAZI Germany. But making NAZI comparisons with one convicted of a crime due to one’s actions, I say no. The Gestapo may have trumped up laws to legitimize Jewish persecution but again, it was because of WHO they are, not what they did. Registrants are in their predicament because of their actions.
                And I find bizarre your insistence that one must accept your false analogies in order to understand government mistreatment of registrants. If not, one is disengaged from reality and bigoted. Okay, whatever David.
                But I will say your failure to understand that going down the path of false analogies doesn’t garnish much sympathy from the very civil liberties groups designed to help us. Sometimes we first must own up to our actions before seeking help.

              • Punished for Life

                Kris Klein,
                So why did the Germans hate the Jews so much?
                Now I’m not on my pitty-pot, but I’ve been living for 26 years on this list as a RSO.
                So our good ole government now wants to make it where I cannot get off of the registry? No matter what!
                I paid my price for my mistakes. Yes, I made a huge mistake.
                Now let’s justify all of your comments as to why they just keep adding on and adding on. Just like the Jews got treated in Germany. Once they were on the train, they couldn’t get off of the train, No matter what!
                That’s where my comparison comes from.

                Frank

              • 4sensiblepolicies

                I cannot help but see the logical connection to treatment of oppressed groups, including Jews, to that of the registered citizen. Kris Klein states that RC’s lose certain rights based on the criminal conviction.

                I can’t argue with that, but if one believes at all in the Constitutional ex post facto prohibitions against additional punishment, then the similarities to oppressed groups and RC’s contain similarities where I have no hesitation in making comparisons.

                The courts and legislatures bend over backwards to make sure they portray these new restrictions as merely ‘regulatory’. This is how they manage to get them to pass Constitutional analysis.

                Therefore, by definition, we are no longer talking about persons who are ‘losing rights’ in respect to their criminal conviction. You are now talking about people who are being regulated in respect to some perceived attribute or trait that they possess as a group – which is the trademark of oppression against ethnic, minority, and religious groups.

                In short, it is wrong and it is oppression when human beings are being profiled and pushed into categories with real and serious negative consequences (e.g long prison sentence for violating the ‘regulation’).

                When a government begins assigning traits to groups of people and restricting movement (e.g. IML) in the complete absence of statistical or even empirical evidence to support new laws, it ought to scare everybody. I’m sorry if it turns off some advocates, but there is a correlation. Any comparison is not meant as an insult, but to point out that these injustices are real and as a reminder of what can and does happen when people don’t stand up to oppression.

              • Timmr

                Basically Kris, look at the history of Nazi Germany. The y persecuted gays. They thought that was a choice. There was no evidence at the time otherwise. They persecuted communists, now that is a political choice for sure, and illegal at tbe time. They persecuted people who married a so called Jew, which was also a choice and illegal. They imprisoned those who didn’t have a job, calling them “work shy”.
                And why should David confess his sins before the ACLU, before they defend his rights? Why should anyone seeking to petition for redress? We have not harmed them. I confessed and showed my remorse to those who I have offended. The others are self proclaimed defenders of the Constitution, not Catholic priests. I owe them no confession. I can say sorry a thousand times and it won’t change one law.

              • Erwin

                I kind of sit on the fence on this one. Being a racial minority, I can understand some of what Kris is saying and she’s only just being brutally honest.

                I’ve been on this forum long enough to hear some of the comparison remarks. I usually shrug them off because most people on this site have a good heart and really do understand the struggle of other groups.

                When my parents first moved to California decades ago, they played by the rules, broke no laws, and became educated professionals. But they still faced discrimination in housing & jobs. Vegas was particularly horrible when they couldn’t even get a hotel room. That said, Southern California was still the land of opportunity and 10 times better than where they came from. And it all worked out good in the end because I enjoyed growing up there and moving on to a productive life.

                If my parents had committed crimes, and faced the same obstacles, their experience would’ve been a bit more “palatable”

                Now don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying discrimination against people who have paid their dues to society should be accepted, however a tiny voice in the back of my head would always be saying “well, if I hadn’t done that, maybe….”

                It’s true registrants can always find similar barriers suffered by other groups. I have to admit the unique passport identifier is Hitlerist. But do we really want to go down that road of saying my burden is just as bad as that other group’s burden? Plus I’m curious to hear the opinion of Jewish registrants.

                I look at the current state of registrants as that of the modern day indentured servant. No matter how much you try to keep up and make amends, the master keeps adding to your tab and giving you more time. That’s the most convincing argument to make against the registry

    • Allen W

      Personally I think this is one of the biggest reasons we are in this situation. Fear of persecution. One of the biggest reason’s so many injustices are inflicted on us is we let them do it to us. I for one am getting tired of it. I committed my crimes 19 years ago. I went to prison (0 infractions during my time), did 10 years on probation with monthly polygraphs at my expense, (3 infractions, self report). I have been fully off any court, D.O.C supervision for over 3 years now. I have gone back to school and got my B.A. Degree, gainfully employed, productive member of society. What does all that get me???? NOTHING!!!! I’ve reached a point in my life where I can finally travel I went to Jamaica in 2013, no issues had the x on my kiosk paper at the Atlanta airport but didn’t get detained for secondary screening. Went to Hong Kong and Thailand in Oct/Nov of 2015 no issue getting into those countries but this time in LAX I was detained for secondary screening and of course every piece of electronic devise was gone through. Went to Thailand again in Feb of 2016 to spend time with my girlfriend there who is a Nurse at the Hospital, no issue at all getting into Thailand. Again detained upon entry into the USA. But now on the third trip to Thailand June 30th, 2016 post IML enactment denied entry into Thailand. Met at the gate by immigration officers shown some paper from the U.S.Department of Homeland Security notifying Thailand of my past convictions from 19 years ago. They would not let me hold it or read it and would not let me have a copy of it but I was immediately sent packing out of the country on the next plane out of there in an hour and half. On my return trip I had a 4 hour layover in Hong Kong so i decided I would go get a hotel room and take a shower. Went through customs no problem, but I suspect that will change once this magic S.O. Identifier is implemented. “The government justifies the passport identifier requirement as an attempt to close a loophole in the current notification scheme, whereby a person can travel to an intermediate country then proceed to their final destination in a third country.”
      To fight this it is going to take money and a hell of a legal team and…… PUBLIC SUPPORT. Get your churches, Family everyone you know to talk to everyone they know about this. I honestly had no idea about IML until I was sent packing on my third trip into Thailand. My trip was to be with my girlfriend and meet her family whom all know of my past. I also had no idea about the 21 day notification before leaving the country. Guess I am lucky U.S. Marshall’s weren’t waiting for me once I got off the plane in LAX.
      Yes…. Fear is why so many of us keep quite and let the government run it up our…. I’m personally done with keeping quite. I don’t announce it from the rooftop that I am an RSO for obvious reasons but I have been talking to friends and family about this IML and “special identifier” getting the word out and asking them to also tell everyone they know and contact their start representatives. If we all band together, show up at the protest if you can, donate money if you can, get family and friends to support us and Churches. We need more than just RSO’s saying this is bad policy. If only RSO’s are complaining it will never go anywhere.
      I don’t see how this isn’t Discrimination; discrimination
      n. unequal treatment of persons, for a reason which has nothing to do with legal rights or ability. Federal and state laws prohibit discrimination in employment, availability of housing, rates of pay, right to promotion, educational opportunity, civil rights, and use of facilities based on race, nationality, creed, color, age, sex or sexual orientation. The rights to protest discrimination or enforce one’s rights to equal treatment are provided in various federal and state laws, which allow for private lawsuits with the right to damages. There are also federal and state commissions to investigate and enforce equal rights.
      Also the Constitution prohibits a statute from creating a conclusive presumption, (Heiner -v- Donnan, 285 U.S. 312, 76 L. Ed. 772; 52 S.CT 358, 12 AM. Jur. 317). Am I wrong but isn’t the IML saying they presume all sex offenders convicted of a sex crime against a minor traveling to engage in sex trafficking. I was never convicted of trafficking of any kind. Another idea… we all pool our money and buy that island they want to send us to.. I vote to buy Hawaii.
      Let’s all stop hiding and stand up. Yes that is my real first name and last initial. I live in Washington state.
      Let’s face it S.O. = modern day leper.

      • Robert

        good for you and i agree, my wife is filipina and am not sure when i will get to see her again. very depressing nut hopefully 1 day it will be over. how did they know in thailand u were a rso? i didnt know about all this stuff as well i was just in the philippines in february 2016 and no problems till i returned to JFK in ny. i live in NJ and can get off registering in 2020. again how did they know you were going there? i am curious? i also heard hong kong is a good place to meet

        • Allen W

          I have no idea how they knew… I can only assume my passport number triggered something in the system. While I was at the airport in San Francisco waiting for my flight to Hong Kong they called me to the desk and asked me for my passport and ticket to confirm something. I can only assume my passport number triggered something in the system.
          Lucky you get off… I have Life on this system.
          I can’t understand how this whole IML and notification system isn’t unconstitutional and a violation of our rights to travel and Ex-post facto. since this was not in effect when I committed my crime and was sentenced.

    • Janice Bellucci

      There is no need for worry, O.A.R. We protested in the City of Carson including a one-mile walk down the city’s main boulevard. Not only were we not harmed, many people who drove by honked their horns in support and give us “thumbs up”.

  28. Allen W

    Isn’t this special identifier they want to put on our passport the same as what the Nazi’s did to the Jew’s!!!!!

    • 4sensiblepolicies

      It’s exactly like it! The goal is the same. Restrict movement. Differentiate ‘them’ from ‘us’ when it would otherwise not be apparent. It was a crime against humanity then as it is now.

      Yet as recently as this week we heard Mitch McConnell touting recent republican led legislation against ‘human trafficking’. And of course, our esteemed constitutional ‘scholar’ obama couldn’t sign the legislation fast enough. These scoundrels are little better than the nazis who deluded themselves that they were protecting their society from some vague threat.

      • Timmr

        I agree. And listening to former Nazis being interviewed long after their defeat, one can see they were still deluding themselves that their plan for cleansing humanity of the deviants was saving future generations.
        When someone in power says that, it should be a big red flag. Show us the evidence.

    • Political Prisoner

      That would make a good protest sign. The Nazi marked passports too!!!

    • O..A.R.

      I saw my grandparent’s passports, and yes, they were marked. They used to say that they are proof evil never wins. I’m glad they aren’t seeing this.

  29. Roger

    I appreciate you guys who are sacrificing time and money to be with us at this protest in Oakland.

    The media and politicians pay attention to these rare events where registered citizens publicly stand up for justice, like we did at the City of Carson and we do in Sacramento against bad bills. They see we are a force to be reckoned with, so it positively changes their perception of us and will impact all the issues we are fighting.

    Consider what it would tell the media and politicians if only a couple of RCs show up?

    But also consider what would happen if only one in 1000 RCs were to come–we would have 135 RCs. That would impress them. Will you be the 1-in-1000 who stands up for the other 1000?

    If you can only make it to a single CA RSOL action this year, why not make it this event?

    Individuals DO make a difference! Please join us!

  30. Allen w

    I’m in Washington but thinking of driving down for this. Is there any other RSO, that would like to share the cost of gas to make it there?

    • Nicholas Maietta

      PLEASE GET IN TOUCH WITH ME. MY EMAIL IS NICK@COMPUTER-HACKER.NET.

      IF YOU CANNOT REACH ME, PLEASE CALL 559-724-7699

      ANYTIME, THE SOONER THE BETTER.

      • Timmr

        Yes, please contact him. I am helping out with his gas from Northern CA. I would hope that that money would go to farther effect, by filling his vehicle with people who would not be able to make it otherwise.

        • Nicholas Maietta

          Allen has contacted me. I’ve sent off a response to him awaiting more information. Hopefully, we can get someone all the way from Washington down to Oakland and back.

          • Timmr

            Great, essentially a free ride for someone up north to one of the most important events we can show up to this year. There is room for 2 or 3 more I hear.

            • Roger

              You guys are awesome! That is true dedication to our fight for justice.

  31. Robert

    I would love to go but i am in New Jersey and its hard to get funds to travel cross country. Its slow and lean times for work

  32. Timmr

    I strongly encourage anyone who can spare a few dollars to help someone else get to this meeting.

  33. David Kennerly

    “DOJ’s Data-Sharing Proposal Threatens Privacy of Americans and Citizens Around the World”

    This is not directly related to IML but it suggests an intriguing link to a larger effort by our government to share data about U.S. citizens with foreign governments. The U.S. Attorney General (i.e. the Obama administration) is championing this bill.

    “Under the proposed legislation, the U.S. government would be able to enter into agreements with foreign countries that would allow those countries to obtain stored data and real-time communications directly from U.S. companies without satisfying a probable cause standard and without the authorization of an independent judge, tribunal, or other impartial body. Such agreements would make it easier for foreign governments to obtain the communications of U.S. persons without a warrant. In order to facilitate such agreements, the legislation weakens several U.S. privacy laws—in particular, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) and the Wiretap Act—which prohibit U.S. companies from disclosing their users’ communications directly to foreign governments. The U.S. government is already negotiating one such agreement with the United Kingdom, which is expected to serve as a template for similar agreements with other countries.”

    So, once again, arrangements that have been previously hammered-out between the U.S. and the U.K. are being employed as the “templates” for policies to be extended to the entire world. This is precisely how the policies which preceded IML set the stage for IML, itself. First there was “The Five Eyes” agreement (all English-speaking countries) sharing information about one another’s sex offenders which was then followed by U.S. notifications to INTERPOL members and then the IML, itself which served to codify and extend policies into law.

    So, we can clearly see that this is not an isolated trend nor one that will end with sex offenders. It doesn’t require much cynicism to imagine why they started with sex offenders, either.

    https://www.aclu.org/blog/free-future/dojs-data-sharing-proposal-threatens-privacy-americans-and-citizens-around-world

    • Timmr

      Yeah, they knew the big civil rights groups were not going to complain if notifications apply to *ex offenders. Too bad ACLU and people like Snowden don’t start taking an historical perspective on these government actions. They came after the sexual devients first an noone camplained…
      It’s hard not to be cynical.

  34. NPS

    Thank you to those who are making sacrifices to attend this important event. However, I will not be able to go. Yes, I do live in the Bay Area, but the sacrifice is too great a risk for my well being. I know there has been some strong opinions against those perceived to be “sitting back” but I do contribute to the cause in other ways. Letter writing, phone calls, attending regional CARSOL meetings, donations, etc. I’ve even been approached by those volunteer ACLU staff about supporting their causes, and I immediately go into a monologue about the rights of registered citizens.

    I am not publicly listed, and the one thing I fear is having to be outed especially after the hard work I’ve put into getting where I am today. I am gainfully employed in a high level position, and I just purchased a house. I know that if my superior ever learned of my status or even my involvement in supporting our cause, I would be fired in a heartbeat.

    Please know that many of us who are not able to attend does not mean we’re not helping in other ways.

    • Janice Bellucci

      We respect your decision not to participate in the protest this week, NPS. We only ask that you show up, stand up and speak up when you’re ready. In the meantime, your donations of time, talent and treasure are appreciated. Thank you!

  35. anonymously

    Derek never questioned the legitimacy of BLM, but commented on their tactics. Bad reading comprehension from Kris on that one. His bottom-lining was just blabbermouthing about a false dichotomy he concocted in order to delegitimize registrants rights movement based on an oversimplification of criteria for protection from unconstitutionalities such as cruel and unusual punishment and ex-post facto victimization.

    • Kris Klein

      To be honest, Derek’s comment is full of lies. BLM members aren’t out there chanting they want dead cops or going around starting riots. In fact, many BLM demonstrators were injured along with the cops in Dallas.
      Now are there bad apples attending BLM rallies & creating chaos? Yes. But 99% of the 100s of rallies they held have been peaceful. We definitely have some bad apples among our registered offenders, but as a whole, we shouldn’t be judged by the actions of a few

      • mch

        KK,

        Interesting comments and thoughts going on. Thank you for good points of discussion. My response is in agreement to this statement you wrote: ” We definitely have some bad apples among our registered offenders, but as a whole, we shouldn’t be judged by the actions of a few”. I agree that we shouldn’t shouldn’t be judged as a group by the actions of a few, but in fact, we are, as you’re well aware. No other group of lawbreakers has had so many laws written and passed against them, no other group of “criminals” has had punishment after punishment heaped upon them, years after they have served, lived righteously and contributed to society. The population of registered citizens is rapidly approaching one million, if we’re not already there. Most registered citizens have done the time for the crime. I speak only for myself; time served without incident, off probation, productive member of my community, but why am I denied the opportunities that other criminals are afforded? Inducing fear is a great political motivator; make enough people afraid and they will jump right onto the train. When one registered citizen falls off the wagon, then we all get punished because the zealots will write and rewrite laws that further encumber our limited freedoms. Injustice still prevails in our society.

  36. anonymously

    kk incorrectly states “wrong. It’s not good to make false comparisons to protected groups like gays, blacks, or women.’

    kk, gays and lesbians are not a protected class nationwide unfortunately. In California, where registrants are a protected class, gays and lesbians are , fortunately, a protected class as well. Obama, through executive order, where not all his executive orders are bad, did provide some relief to transgenders as far as bathroom usage in government buildings and schools on a nationwide level. He has not, as of yet, made executive orders to provide protected class status to gays and lesbians, and national protected class status of gays and lesbians does not exist. I would not be surprised if real gays and lesbians who know if they are a recognized protected class or not would be offended by having the legitimacy of movements to protect their rights dependent on if their inclusion in their persecuted class stemmed from an action that has a criminal element to it in the here and now, in many non-US places like Iran, where death is the penalty for being gay, or in the US where anti-sodomy laws were invalidated by Lawrence v Texas in 2003, but discrimination still exists in many forms including denials of service.

    • Kris Klein

      Many states including the one I live in protect gays & lesbians from discrimination. I was thinking in regard to state laws. But you’re right, there is no protection on the federal level.
      Now if you want to nitpick my comments to try and find some inaccuracies, why don’t you correct the o.p. I responded to Derek Logue who said BLM members were starting riots and calling for the death of cops?

  37. Clark

    Injustice has no color or gender or race or class; its an equal opportunity Evil.
    Those who challenge injustice try to stop its path so it doesn’t contaminate the whole system.
    The iml is Injustice.

  38. Allen W

    Many of you may have already read this one but I would hope Kris Kline takes a minute to read it. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2016/01/06/the-yellow-star-the-scarlet-letter-and-international-megans-law/

    Yes Kris, we know we are guilty of committing crimes no one is denying that. But why should one class of criminals be signaled out over others. Why should sex offenders who have the lowest rate of recidivism next to murders, and over time the risk reduces even more be signaled out? Yes, I am guilty of my crimes… 20 years ago. I completed my prison term, I completed my probation, I paid all my fines, I have my civil rights restored. Do I have to register for life… YES. I am gainfully employed. Have maintained residency for the whole time since being released from prison. I hate to brag but I probably make more money than you do and I am a convicted SEX OFFENDER. Are my rights any less than yours? Get the heck over yourself. I was not convicted for trafficking of any form. I am not part of any organized crime organisation and we all know the average sex offender is not loading up a container of young ladies and boys to do those despicable things to…. Organized crime is where that is at or how about look at the drug trafficker. You are so uneducated you are embarrassing yourself. ALL Lives MATER!!!

    Take a minute and read the The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    I’ll help you out a little… (wish I could bold and underline parts for you)

    Article 2.

    Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, (key words… EVERYONE!!! WITHOUT DISTINCTION OF ANY KIND!!!)

    Article 5.

    No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.(HOW IS SORA NOT DEGRADING???)

    Article 7.

    All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination. (SPEAKS FOR ITSELF)

    Article 11.

    (1) Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence.
    (2) No one shall be held guilty of any penal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed. (EX-POST-FACTO)

    Article 13.

    (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state.
    (2) Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.(IML DIRECTLY VIOLATES THIS)

    I can go on and on with this…

    My point is take your ball and go home. You need to read and read more and more. And if you think the government is going to stop with sex offenders you are even more blind than I thought. Once precedence is set there is no stopping them from imposing other such laws against any and all groups and classes of people.

    Read this one too

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tamara-rice-lave/international-megans-law-_b_9513242.html

    • Kris Klein

      If you took the time to read my comments Allen, my criticism isn’t about the law favoring one class of criminals over another. Of course I think it’s unfair that sex offenders are dealt more punishment over other crimes. However, I have a problem with comparing the plight of registrants with other groups who have not committed no crime but face discrimination simply for who they are
      …..and sorry. I’ll still be here. You just have to take your bitter medicine and accept the fact that people have different points of view even if we are in the same boat

    • Screech

      Whoa Dude! We all the same here. If you can’t take a slightly different opinion on this forum, you gonna be be toeeeee up on a regular news site where 90% of the people have unkind words to say about sex offenders. Try spreading your anger & posting all that legal mumble jumble over there LOL!

  39. Harry

    Even though I would like to be there, however, we can not afford to come. We will be praying and interceding for all of those who are on the frontlines. Victory! Victory! Victory!

  40. Punished for Life

    Stand tall in Oakland. Those of us in Nevada who are unable to make the journey West, are with you all the way. Wish I could be there, too.

    Frank

  41. Erwin

    Today’s the big day! I wish the best to everyone who shows up and fills the courtroom.

    • Timmr

      Good amount of people there. Good news coverage. News 10 Sacramento did a few interviews. Great event!

  42. Rob

    Good luck everyone!

  43. ma.concerned.citizen

    Good luck to everyone today, and thanks for standing for all of us! Being in Massachusetts, it just wasn’t feasible for me to be there, but I’ll be with you in spirit. Fight the good fight!!!

    • Mike

      I am sure anxious for a report on what occurred today. Anybody hear anything?

  44. David Kennerly

    I just got back from our demonstration at the Federal Courthouse in Oakland which followed the hearing to dismiss our lawsuit.

    The judge has not yet ruled on the issue of dismissal BUT… judging by her questions during the proceeding, we are guardedly optimistic that she will NOT dismiss our lawsuit against the government and may even grant our request to modify/add to the suit. If so, that would be wonderful.

    The rally after the hearing was a big success. I failed to do a count of participants, although I’m sure someone else has, but it was certainly enough to draw attention from passersby. Several media organizations were there, including a Channel 10/ABC affiliate (but I’m not sure from which city; it was not the S.F./Oakland affiliate). We had lots of signs and printed material to offer visitors. We had mostly good and encouraging comments from most people and only a few slightly nasty ones.

    The Department of Homeland Security was there in force to protect us, or protect others FROM us 🙂 perhaps and, while they made us remove signs that were bungeed to the light poles, they didn’t hassle us much. We had obtained a permit beforehand.

    Several of us were creating videos of the event and I hope to post an edited piece on YouTube soon.

    The demonstration is exactly what we need to be doing and what we should be doing more.

    Thanks to everyone who attended!

    • PK

      David, what was the modification request for the Lawsuit?

      • David Kennerly

        PK, it is referred to in The Courthouse News Service piece written by a reporter who attended the hearing:

        “She [Bellucci] added that other laws prior to the International Megan’s Law also inform foreign governments of sex offenders’ travel plans, including National Guidelines for Sex Offender Registration and Notification, which allows U.S. Marshals to advise nations of sex offenders coming to their jurisdictions, and the Immigration and Custom Enforcement’s Operation Angel Watch.
        Bellucci said she’d just learned that International Megan’s Law will expand on those laws and would like the opportunity to amend the plaintiffs’ complaint to address the issue.”

        “We didn’t know what kind of authority they were claiming as their foundation,” Bellucci said. “Now that we know, we have some very significant questions about that.”

        Read the whole thing here: http://www.courthousenews.com/2016/07/27/sex-offenders-fight-passport-scarlet-letter.htm

  45. PK

    Hi it’s been nearly 12 hours since the site has been updated, and I’m sure a lot of people are eagerly waiting, including myself, to hear about what happened in Oakland.

  46. Janice Bellucci

    More than 40 people today participated in a peaceful protest held outside the federal district court in Oakland. Participants included registrants and supporters from California as well as several other states, including Florida, Missouri and Oregon. Today’s protest included the burning of sex offender registration cards by six registrants led by CA RSOL Treasurer Frank Lindsay.

    “Today’s protest was a tremendous success,” stated CA RSOL President Janice Bellucci. “We effectively communicated to the public and to the media our position that the International Megan’s Law (IML) violates the U.S. Constitution.”

    The protest immediately followed oral arguments made in support of, and in opposition to, the federal government’s motion to dismiss the case. During the court hearing, the government argued that the federal government needs to notify foreign countries when registrants intend to visit in order to prevent child sex tourism and child sex trafficking. The government also argued the need to add a “conspicuous unique identifier” to the passports of hundreds of thousands of registrants in order to stop them from visiting multiple countries during a single trip.

    Registrant attorney Bellucci argued that notifications sent to foreign countries have a “chilling effect” upon registrants, many of whom are now afraid to travel overseas. She also argued that notifications are harm registrants’ ability to travel overseas in order to meet with family members, conduct business and pursue cultural interests. She further argued that they place registrants and anyone who travels with them at risk of physical harms.

    During today’s hearing, Bellucci asked Judge Hamilton to deny the government’s motion to dismiss the case and instead to allow registrants to amend the complaint. The judge did not issue a decision today, however, a decision is expected within the next 30 days.

    • Clark

      Thank you Janice Bellucci & staff…
      Thank you All who showed up today…
      Thank you All who can still help & support this effort that challenges this iml Injustice.
      O U T S T A N D I N G .

    • PK

      Thank you Janice for the update on this.

      Someone else had indicated that the Judge had already made her decision.

      “Janice made excellent arguments before the judge, so the judge did not dismiss the case”

      • Timmr

        No, I think it is meant to read, that she, the judge, just did not outright dismiss the case then and there, that is a good sign. One thing I noticed is, that the judge repeatedly questioned why the lawsuit did not include the present government actions, authorized under what she called existing law. Is there really any existing laws that authorize sex offender notifications sent out to countries? I don’t know, just asking. What “existing law” authorizes the present system of notification and yes, why are those not included in the complaint? I am confused by this. The judge kept saying she was confused by this, at the last hearing in March, and a couple of times at this hearing. Can anyone explain why the judge was so hung up on this? What difference to her does it make which version of this evil is found unconstitutional?

        • PK

          I don’t believe there is an existing Law about Notifications.

          The State Department have Guidelines that they use in order to revoke someone’s Passport, if that person was involved in Sex Trafficking.

        • Mike

          Timmr I wondered about this from the beginning. The fact that the government was sending notifications prior to the lawsuit to me does not make the process legal as it was unchallenged in court. That the government can send a notice that a person is dangerous is incredulous. I got an email from my attorney in Mexico yesterday and he said that the notice from the USA indicates to Mexico that I am dangerous. That is the reason why I was not allowed to enter. If this action was not challenged in court, I wonder as to why not?

        • David H

          Tim the judge needs to be able to hang her hat on a matter of law, not simple outrage about some vague notion about what may or may not happen at a future date.

          You’re right, i see this as a good thing and I pray she allows us to amend the complaint; it seems she will if she is the one bringing it up–hint, hint!

          • Timmr

            I agree with her, the whole notification web with all its supporting threads, needs to be looked at. I don’t see how one can judge the IML on its own, not realistically. Like she mentioned, you remove the IML, you still have the notifications. No? As I see it, you remove one thread and the web can still snare its victims. If I were her, I would want to allow the amendments, just to see how extensive it all is, human curiosity, if you will.

  47. Clark

    Hopefully the judge will allow an amended complaint so she has a better picture of the fundamental Constitutional rights involved. She must examine under strict scrutiny the atrocities this iml put against the Constitution and put against Free Americans.
    This can be won.

    • PK

      I guess nearly 4 weeks have passed since the Motion to Dismiss and the Request to Ammend the Complaint was heard.

      Has there been any news on this? TIA.

      • Clark

        Haven’t heard a thing PK.
        But hopefully this Judge will consider to amend or proceed lawsuit because the issues involved command strict scrutiny; Fundamental Rights.
        Again, this can be won.
        On its face, the iml is illegal Un-Constitutional and outrageous civil rights violations.
        Hopefully the judge will allow a clearer picture or walk through this iml atrocity really is on Free Citizens and our Constitution.

      • Janice Bellucci

        The judge does not have a deadline by which to rule on the government’s Motion to Dismiss the case. I believe, however, that the longer the judge takes to rule on the motion, the more likely it is to be a favorable ruling. Please stay tuned as the judge’s decision will be announced on this website as soon as it is available.

  48. The Coffey Family

    Thanks to all who tried, and carpooled and drove all the way to OAK. Many took Vacation time off and traveled.
    THANK YOU, my Spouse(RC) was there as I had to complete work’s deadlines as a new mgr.

    Thanks to valued comments on here to all that did and thoughts about those who read them.
    Janice and Frank and Ira and other Board Members who were present. We will look forward
    to hear response from her within the thirty day period.

    I also want to thank a man(RC) who rode his motorcycle from west SoCal and spoke and encouraged my Spouse that day as well. Amazing individual and surprised.

    Pedro, best of luck as my Spouse’s generation are all buried there and he needs to go where his family is from France as well. Never been since birth.

    I sincerely hope that person from Ukiah was able to contact the individuals that offered carpooling., it’s tough, 55 apartment communities turning you down for residency. TOUGH.

    Again, THANKS to all on here on in person in that Courtroom for IML in Oakland and other locations including AZ.

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