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National

‘There must be a better way’ to look at sex offenses

According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), there are 843,260 registered sex offenders listed in the United States. Some will spend five, 10 or 40 years in prison, but in truth, when they get out and reenter society, offenders are doomed to a life sentence without bars. Full Article

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  1. Tom

    Yea there is different way to look at sex offenses and especially these illegal registration laws the entire country has been defrauded into believing are registration laws.
    Here’s what these state soras really are. They are presumptively and predetermined mental health laws and determinations that you are not told is a mental health law. They, the state, presumptively predetermined you are recidivistic, dangerous, and violent, and a threat to the public, usually for the rest of your life.
    But you get none of the well established procedural or substantive due processes of a mental health law or probable cause hearing, or a fair and impartial trial, or individualized psychiatric evaluations, that all other identical or nearly identical mental health laws provide.
    Plus even when they give you this fraudulent mental health diagnosis and prognosis by the state you get no treatment, even when they are required to do so. So you get nothing, and they get to legally defame you for as long as they want.
    These acts by definition are what is called unlawful mental health acts, involuntary servitude, or slavery, disenfranchisement, or nationalization. Take your pick?
    Moreover, they don’t ever say you are being given a mental health diagnosis, or tell you that they have custody and control over you, usually through supervision, management, and guardianship by way of a system of surety. Surety refers to persons who are responsible for making sure you do something, or appear at specific places.
    For those of you in California your own 9th circuit has already made decisions in other cases that demonstrates you are in the custody of the state. Problem is, none of you Californians have asked the court whether or not you are in custody. Because if you are, the soars is illegal as it gets, since they don’t tell you your in custody, do they, lol.
    So the scotus has said soras are regulatory laws, well they are, illegal mental health regulatory laws. This is what everyone has missed so far. So if you establish you are in custody like all other state continuous of custody and punishment are, you should be home free, because they don’t tell you or provide you anything in return, or any procedural or substantive due process related to the custody or mental health diagnosis and prognosis of the sora.
    So this is the only legitimate way to look at these fraudulent, illegal, and unconstitutional soras. But your lawyers won’t tell you this because, hey, they’re making a living off of this crap.

    There’s way to much to talk about related to sex offenses, and all of the reasons why they happen and the harm they cause. Maybe another time.

  2. pgm111

    Well written article. Too bad more LEOs do not share his open-minded wisdom.

  3. kat

    The author is correct, our society is very “sexualized” and at a much younger age than any other generation. Kids date much earlier, girls wear make-up as toddlers, parents have no problem paying for clothes for their kids that might be a bit too provocative, but that “everyone else is wearing”. We give our children access to their own phone and expose them to the internet before they can even walk.
    And then….we throw them in prison because they unintentionally downloaded and looked at “Free” porn or they sent their girlfriend/boyfriend a “sexy” picture on their personal phone. The underage teens (and I’m not even sure that means anything in today’s world) who have consensual sex get thrown in jail because one of them is slightly older than the other. (And the accusing parents pretend they themselves never had premarital sex and that the accused teen must be a pervert.)
    And then… we label these people sex offenders regardless of age or severity of their crime. We send them to prison for 5-10 years without any rehabilitation because the fact is, they don’t need rehabilitation for any of these things, porn has been around forever, people may look at something Free on the internet, that doesn’t make them a pervert, it makes them human. Teens have been sharing sexy pictures for years, it’s not the best decision they’ve ever made, but it probably won’t be the worst either.
    I’m all for putting those true violent sexual predators in prison, those who produce and distribute child pornography as well. And yes, those folks need treatment. Maybe some can even be rehabilitated.
    But as for labeling every person who commits what the over-zealous government perceives as a sexualized offense with a “sex offender” label, no, I don’t agree. All the laws and bills that have resulted in outrageous sex offender laws which do nothing but shame and humiliate registrants and their families where born out of media hype after single, tragic incidents. The media made every sex offender a “monster” in society’s eyes and then did nothing to squelch the pitchfork and torch mentality that resulted from their false or inaccurate news stories.
    There is a better way to look at sex offenders. We need to start by reworking the laws that have gotten so crazy, using the registry only for what it was intended, monitoring only those that truly need to be monitored, not making registrants the object of witch-hunts. We need to find our humanity again.

  4. Matt Duhamel

    I love his comment, “Have we gone nuts?” Yes, we have. Change will come. It may take some time, but I’m confident the politicians, states, courts, etc. will look back and realize that these barbaric laws did no good whatsoever.

    • Ron

      “… states, courts, etc. will look back…”
      You are correct. This will happen. But, it won’t be in our lifetimes. The best we can hope for is that in 100 years people will look back on this as another Salem witch trial, for we will be long dead.

      • Janice Bellucci

        Ron, I believe that we will reach The Tipping Point “soon” when the public understands the truth about registrants. And when we do, legislators and others will run in front of our parade and claim they always supported our worthy cause. Looking forward to that day.

        • Nondescript

          I kind of agree with Janice. Moreover, the medias official narratives are starting to fall apart. More and more people don’t trust what they hear on the nightly news, and are turning to alternative sources for information. I think people really do WANT the truth. Even my elderly mother is beginning to see through the corporate media lies. She is my bell weather.

          The legislation regarding registrants that has been proposed over the past 10 or so years are so outrageously dystopian, it is almost as if they WANT us to fight back . ( I have my own theory as to why that might be but I I won’t discuss it on this forum)

          No, it will not take decades to expose. We are on the precipice of exposing their lies and their labeling of people to suit their agenda and once that happens, we can prevail with a more sensible and prudent way to help even those with real addictions and compulsions get the help they need.

          The darkest hours are just before dawn…..

          P

      • LM

        I wouldn’t necessarily use a defeatist tone, but it will take an event to bring about a paradigm shift. Everyone thought the Confederate Flag in SC would stay flying forever until violent extremism happened.

        The rhetoric of the child safety advocates needs to be discredited and debunked along with the registry schema deligitimized.

        The registry does not keep little Adam and Megan from dying in vain – it defiles their memory.

  5. David

    Good article. Too bad no politicians are likely to heed the common sense arguments.

  6. mike r

    welcome Tom its great to see (but also unfortunate for the reason why your here) another intelligent individual adding constructive spot on comments..

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