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Will More Kids Be Branded Sex Offenders for Life?

On May 22, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Federal Adam Walsh Reauthorization Act of 2017. The House’s judiciary subcommittee on crime, terrorism, homeland security and investigations worked to reauthorize the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act, the only federal law that requires states, tribes and other jurisdictions to register children who have committed sexual offenses. Full Article

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  1. AlexO

    I think you could remove all references to “juvenile offenders” and the article would still be 100% accurate about the registration. The registry in no way protects anyone but it certainly is a heavy weight for both the registered citizen, their family, and even their neighbors who needless worry about who’s next door.

  2. kat

    Totally agree with AlexO, remove “juvenile offender” from the article and it could pertain to anyone on the registry. No one can predict the future, one mistake does not mean a person is destined to repeat that mistake, juvenile or adult. The Adam Walsh Child Protection Act protects no one, it should have been reworked or squashed. A stain on our country and it’s laws.

    • New Person

      I don’t know why there isn’t an article about the Oregon State pitcher who was outed as a sex offender.

      The offense took place in his teens, a juvenile. He still had to register when he became an adult. He missed the 10-day annual registration window, but it was later dismissed. Some writers went digging. They got records of his offense as a juvenile.

      This pitcher is one of the top pitchers in collegiate baseball. There’s an article stating since this revelation, he goes from possibly being drafted in the 2nd or 3rd round of the draft to not being drafted.

      There goes his future. It’s sad. He can’t escape his past to forge anew. The courts surely didn’t protect him being a juvenile.

      • AlexO

        What was his crime? Was it an actual crime or was he just sexting?

          • New Person

            Nice find, Timmr!

            I just feel bad for the pitcher. I mean the who USA knows who he is. I read lots of sports blogs and he’s referred to as (not that one) pitcher when discussing about the College World Series and the MLB draft.

            There’s money to be made in the draft. The higher up you get drafted, the more money you make. The Oregonian just cost this guy the potentiality to make a lot more money.

            What’s worse is that I thought juvenile records were sealed?! This public shaming cost him fair employment as well as playing in games slated he was supposed to start for the team.

            I don’t know why this situation or articles to this situation isn’t part of the ACSOL website. To me, this was huge. To hear thoughts that he went from rounds 2/3 to being undrafted when all he was doing is trying to better himself has me feeling like we’ll never get over the whole registration system as we’ll always be painted as monsters who can never be rehabilitated.

            What the authors of the outing of this kid did was be vigilante-like and ruined his career at this point of his life, maybe for the rest of his life. Also, those same authors identified who the victim was! The victim does have rights and these authors just wanted sensationalism.

            It appears no one can move on from the past. Thanks, Oregonion.

            • Timmr

              Follow Oncefallen, Women Against the Registry on twitter. All these stories show up there first.

  3. David

    Doesn’t two (or more) State Supreme Courts coming up with contradictory rulings suggest a matter going to the US Supreme Court?

  4. T

    These lawmakers and people that support tough sex offender registry laws need to realize the hardships that they are causing, and need to be giving a receiving end of what it’s like to be on the SOR.

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