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Janice's Journal

Janice’s Journal: Why Did Senator Franken Resign?

U.S. Senator Al Franken has announced that he will soon resign.  The public reason he gave for his resignation is that he has been accused of sexual misconduct.  The real reason, however, may be something quite different.

For how does a man, even a U.S. Senator, defend himself after he has been accused of sexual misconduct in a society that assumes guilt rather than innocence when a person has been accused of such an offense?  A society that ignores important safeguards of the Constitution including that we are innocent until proven guilty.

I don’t know what Sen. Franken did or didn’t do.  I don’t know if his accusers are telling the truth.

What I do know is that I am frightened by what I see happening in our society today.  What I see is a rush to judgment in the court of public opinion by a group of U.S. Senators calling for Sen. Franken’s resignation even though he has disputed some accusations against him and has not had the opportunity to face those who have accused him in court.  What I see are elected officials, who swore under oath to protect the Constitution, ignore the  Constitution by choosing a one size fits all path for anyone accused of any type of sexual misconduct .

This rush to judgment and failure to distinguish between accusations and proof is evidence of the legal environment in our country today, which can be compared to past eras  when the protections of the U.S. Constitution were denied to Japanese American citizens and others.  The legal environment in our country today can also be compared to past eras in other countries such as France where people were led to the guillotine because they were born of nobility.

While it is true that no one in the U.S. is being led to the guillotine today, something almost as dangerous is occurring because individuals accused of sexual misconduct are being denied the protections of the U.S. Constitution.  Those individuals have a right to face those who accuse them in a court of law.  They also have the right to be declared innocent until and unless it can be proven that they are guilty of the conduct of which they have been accused.  Finally, if they are found guilty in a court of law, they have the right to be sentenced appropriately by a judge, not by their peers.

It is time for the United States of America to wake up!  It is time for the United States to provide all of its citizens, including those accused of sexual misconduct, with the protections that flow from its Constitution.

— by Janice Bellucci

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  1. AlexO

    Thank you, Janice.

    • catch 22

      With all that is going on we all have a certain comfort or feeling from all these charges and that is WELCOME TO OUR WORLD

  2. B.Wat

    Right on Janice!

  3. J

    Please send a copy of this to the The Justices as well as The President and others of authority. Very well written and eye opening. Thanks.

  4. mike r

    McCarthyism. No two ways about. This isn’t even synonymous, this is an exact copy of McCarthyism down to the Hollywood actors and Hollywood elites all the way through the entire three branches of government. All I can say is KARMA is a b@#$$@! right? This is nothing but fantastic and a beautiful example of how unconstitutional acts and greed will eventually bite them in the a@#$$. I would be worried like Janice and every American should be, but to me and I bet a majority on the list, who have and are already been or are being subjected to whats happening. LMFAO at all these people for not stopping these witch hunts and unconstitutional laws. I told you guys collective karma would happen. This entire nation better be holding their breath and praying I win my case or this last stand will be the end of any hope for this country. I am not exaggerating or being vain or being delusional, I hope someone with any kind of legal experience or expertise realizes how important my case is. I don’t need any help from any of them because I have a few of the most intelligent people on the planet allready helping me, but it would be nice to have some supporting breifs or some kind of backup support or something, anything, from some kind of org. My god if and when I prevent my case from being dismissed on some technicality I am going to change not only this country but I will severe all the far reaching tentacles reaching across the globe. You know just about every great invention or movements in history were done by people who the masses thought were insane because they were attempting the impossible eith what they were doing, look how that turned out. Well that’s me, I am out of my mind that I think I can win against the machine and I really could care less what anyone thinks or says. When I don’t get any support or recognition from any of the big orgs it just makes me that much more determined. Chris, AJ, New Person, and inadvertently Will Bassler, Derek logue, Robert Wolf, and all the experts out there that have been brave enough to stand up and challenge the status quo and who are trying to bring sanity back in the world. You will all be cononized. This platform my be one of the most important platforms to ever exist by proxy.

    • HOOKSCAR

      @Miker,
      I have firm belief that you can open the courts eyes to the abuses the federal and state governments have been guilty of. I have your argument and have tweaked it here and there. I am following what your experiences are in the courts. Is there a way that this can turn into a class action? I would be the first to sign on. I am disabled and my options are slim, but if it can………..

  5. john doe

    Yes, this is well written.

    Why is there a sudden spike in sex allegations among hollywood and politicians. Is this really what the public wants to see in their news headlines? Are the news agencies boasting sex-related stories to compete with internet media. On behalf of 4 people. We are uninterested in hearing about the sex accusation on the news.

    I wish Constitution awareness was taught to the public general assemblies. In schools. In courts. Or even cities would mass mail constitutional material to their citizens. When I was growing up. Nobody ever talked about the constitution. Everyone knew it existed. But as a teen it seemed to be a relic from the days of old. Nobody taught us any different.

  6. Michael

    “For how does a man, even a U.S. Senator, defend himself after he has been accused of sexual misconduct in a society that assumes guilt rather than innocence when a person has been accused of such an offense? A society that ignores important safeguards of the Constitution including that we are innocent until proven guilty.”

    A society that assumes guilt rather than innocence is true in all cases of misconduct. Personally, I blame people like wackadoo extraordinaire Nancy Grace, and just plain ignorance on the part of Americans.

    ….

    • New Person

      How does a man defend himself after paying the price of his crime to always be assumed of sexual misconduct in a society that assumes guilt rather than innocence?

      Essentially, this is a mirror for registration. No one cares about facts and constitutionality with it comes to mob rule. This climate is a very dangerous climate. A new sci-fi show depicts such an instance with a satire. The show is called the Orville and the episode is called, “Majority Rule”. Essentially, it’s a world based upon likes and dislikes, not rules of law.

      • Michael

        Some people point to the Internet as a reason for why people behave the way they do. We live in a holier-than-thou society. Personally, I think Americans have always been this way. It’s just that before the Internet, there was no way of knowing it was so widespread. Things the United States is certainly not short of are arrogance and hypocrisy.

        ….

  7. kind of living

    Well said Janice !

  8. jw

    The rash of public offenses and the public reaction has me torn. I see public officials accused of actions far worse than the accusations that resulted in my conviction (with lifelong registration) and wonder if I should wish they suffer the same as I do, or wish I could “suffer” the same as them. If only I could give a public speech and resign my job. Instead, once a year on my birthday I have to attend the merely administrative task of showing my county sherif that my fingerprints did not change in the past year. If registration is only administrative, perhaps public officials who have had to resign for sex offenses should also be registered.

  9. Tim Moore

    Frankly, I would like to demand that some lawmakers like Chris Smith resign. People like him have been abusing me and fellow registrants with ever more restricting laws all for their own political gain. I feel powerless and don’t trust the system which embolden such men. The politics of the powerful vs. the dispossessed is complex. Sometimes the tables seem to turn. When the system continually fails you, and those in power find ways to thwart your every attempt at justice, you look for other ways. In common misery any opportunity is a blessing. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

  10. mike r

    Why did he resign? Either guilty as h@#$$ or he has no gonadssss. I would say both…

  11. Registry Rage

    I truly believe we’re living in the golden age of victim-hood. And I actually believe it’s peaking right now.

    Also, this #metoo thing is NOT helping our plight AT ALL..

    • A Silver Lining?

      I disagree with you, Registry Rage. I think the current sexual harassment hysteria might prove helpful to us. People are starting to think about degrees of offense. Is a hand on a buttocks equivelent to forced penetration? Is the broad-brush, knee-jerk response and the headlong rush to burn everyone at the stake truly appropriate?? I think it is a good thing that the current hysteria is making people think about the degrees and severity of offenses because they may also begin to think about the degrees and severity of punishments and long-term repercussions. And, as the conversation progresses, they may also begin to think about Sex Offense Registries, their stated purposes and their (lack of) effectiveness in regard to those stated public safety purposes.

  12. Eric

    It is quite simple as to why he resigned so suddenly: he is experiencing what we all experience, being vilified publicly, the shame and embarrassment, the finger pointing, the rumormongering, the hate talk, accusations and suspicion lurking at every gathering you attend. Even if he was innocent, he quickly realized this was not a battle he was ready to fight. Being accused of a sex crime is not for the weak, and having a lifetime sentence of the abuse takes some real tenacity.

  13. KM

    While I agree with the general thought behind this post, there is a photo of Al Franken being sexually inappropriate.

    • Tim Moore

      I don’t know Mr Franken’s thoughts, but he seems basically like an honest guy. Sure the natural reaction for many when accused of something shameful is to minimize the impact to the ego. He might have denied certain parts of the accusations but acknowledged the general wrong doing. His speech seems to suggest this and he is trying to heal wounds or simply to put a halt to further embarrassment, I don’t know.
      One thing that is perplexing is that while senators are expected to be sexual saints, they can rape and pillage the middle and lower classes through shoving an unpopular tax bill up our arses, and people still say oh, I probably deserved it.

    • stephen

      That photo is all that’s needed to kick him out, and I have no pity for him, he along with all the others have put their signature to these registry laws.

  14. David Kennerly, "In the long list of all of your problems, I'm the least of them"

    Just when you think it couldn’t get any weirder it does, things having become an eerily obsessive phantasmagoria. This must be what it must look like when the whole country suffers a collective nervous breakdown. I’m just waiting for them to administer, what would have to be, the equivalent of electro-shock. The only guilty pleasure still available to me is the very dark satisfaction I take in having called it thirty-five years ago. This was upon the arrival of the pod people to positions of power and influence. “The Invasion Of the Body Snatchers;” mission complete!

  15. mike r

    Oh, by the way, I have to commend Janice on her beautifully articulated post. I am glad to see her objectiveness when it comes to this subject and not letting emotions get in the way of sound judgement. She does have a very intelligent and observational mind that holds on to reality in times where most people buckle to the emotional hype portrayed by the media and public opinion.
    I hope she is praying for my success.

  16. Tim L

    It is a shame that no REAL evidence is needed to convict. The proof of this real problem in our system of blind justice comes in the form of DNA exoneration. The fact that many groups have formed to correct wrongful convictions proves beyond a reasonable doubt that WRONGFUL CONVICTIONS occur in the US on a regular basis.

    1. Who, or what groups benefit from WRONGFUL FELONIZATION of innocent men?
    2. How has the necessity for “actual evidence” necessary for sound conviction been diminished over time?
    3. Once a wrongful conviction has been identified, why is it that so many legal professionals defend the bad conviction so vehemently, even when DNA points to another wrong doer?

  17. John

    I fully agree with your sentiments, though somehow credible accusations of sexual impropriety appear to have no weight when it comes to senatorial candidates in Alabama or the current occupant of the White House.

  18. mike r

    No Hookscar thats exactly the point is that it isn’t a class action but an as applied challenge. Class actions are much easier to dismiss because of the diversity of plantiffs. it’s been one of the biggest problems with cases like the civil commitment suits and It eould be a bad idea even in an IML suit. Many of our circumstances are different and the laws and results will be different if say someone was included in the suit that is high risk or has multiple convictions. I believe as applied challenges have the best chances of success. John that’s because they have enough gonads to stand up and fight the machine. its not a partisan issue its a courage issue even if they are guilty as hell. Yes it is a huge issue that someone can be convicted on someones word especially knowing all the cases in which people have lied in courts or have failing or altered recollections of facts.

    • HOOKSCAR

      @Miker
      I get it now. Had a brain tumor so I am not as sharp as I used to be. Lol!!!! Learning a lot from your posts and eventually I will file my own challenge. Looking to next year to see if I can swing it financially. If you do not mind me asking, how much has this venture hit you monetarily?

  19. mike r

    The accused need to stand up and straight scream at the top of their lungs so to speak and demand evidence and not be intimidated into submission. They should be suing anyone who makes these accusation without any evidence for defamation. Especially when they start throwing pedophile and child molester and sexual predator out there. 13th shows how that connotation was what people have been called for decades now. Siper predator was what Clinton use. Jumping to another topic, I just watched the documentary called 13th for an assignment for my sociology class and I recommend that everyone should make it a priority to watch that film.Very powerful.

    • Nondescript

      The “feminist” movement is just one aspect of the globalists Agenda. The movement is funded by George Soros to create division between the sexes, just as other groups are funded to create division between the races. The Clinton/Soros machine is falling apart and people of conscious are waking up to what has been going on.

      In regards to the tiered registry, I never trusted the motivations of Jackie Lacey or Nancy O’Malley. I always thought they were just tools for the agenda to push a different perspective on lifelong registration to move California in the direction of being 100 percent SORNA compliant, regardless of their rhetoric.

      Any woman who is an advocate for a sex offender registry is an absolute fool in my opinion, because our children are more likely to be ensnared in these laws than protected by them.

      Anyway, there is a lot of veracity to your rant and is appreciated by this female poster.

  20. mike r

    Super predator. Demagoguery at it’s best.

    • Tim Moore

      Superpredator was a term used in the nineties to conjure up images of black urban youth with no morals or conscience who were believed would kill anyone casually for the drug money or simply for the thrill of it. It wasn’t referring to sex criminals. I remember, seemed like every white in the country was afraid to drive through a poor black or Latino neighborhood for fear of being shot. The superpredators were everywhere if one believed the headlines. And they were believed, The news made it seem real. Our fear monger in chief had a role to play in fanning the flames with his letter to the Times calling for the execution of the Brooklyn five, black teenagers falsely accused of rape and murder. Sex and violence, what is more frightening? He still thinks they did it. Why do you think all those gated communities spang up in the late eighties and nineties? Fear sells. The middle class wanted Mayberry RFD, but thought they had to fence out Harlem to create it. They maybe just fenced in themselves mentally. Glendora, Glen Prison. As youth crime actually dropped and the panic subsided, the super predator was replaced by the sex offender the boogiemen of the season, the roving black ghetto teen pushed aside for the more scary roving middle aged white guy in a trench coat standing in the dark bushes or driving in a beat up white van following school buses. I think people don’t like feeling safe in the long run. Maybe just Americans. Contentment doesn’t go with our biology, or we are so trained now to live in a tv world or now an internet world and have something new all the time. When one fear gets old a new one is conjured up. Something in their boring lives calls out for the thrill of the pursuit or teeth in the dark. Unfortunately media obligates because it pays well.

  21. The Static-99R Is A Scam

    It makes no sense that after Trump’s numerous sexual harassment claims against him, he remains *President* of the United States of America, while Al Franken (who actually has redeeming qualities) steps down. Meanwhile, Ray Moore — who has seemingly done far worse than Franken — is on the verge of winning Alabama’s Senate seat. The Republicans stand by Moore, while the Democrats have just thrown Franken under the bus… even after all the good he’s done over the years.

    Sort of like how Billy Bush was thrown under that Access Hollywood bus. Billy Bush was fired for laughing at Trump’s “locker room talk.” Trump then goes on to become POTUS (maybe with the help of Russian hacking) for telling the jokes that Bush simply laughed at. Go figure!

    I guess the difference is that Trump and Moore have denied the allegations. So that would, at least in theory, necessitate some type of trial to prove or disprove guilt. Whereas, Franken — in telling indication of his (probably) more better conscious — immediately admitted that at least some of the allegations were true. IMO, it takes a better person to admit wrongdoing than to deny wrongdoing. I just find it hard to believe that the many women who have come out against Trump and Moore are making it up.

    Either way, I think Franken should have weathered the storm and stayed in. If Trump, Moore, et al. refuse to leave, then why should have Franken left? The Democrats lost an influential and intelligent player IMO. But maybe Franken had other reasons?

    • Tim Moore

      I think you have exposed the corruption in the system. The ones who acknowledge their mistakes get shafted while the macho men jerks who hold their ground and deny everything retain their high positions. These women have a point, but the plan of action is at this point more re-actionary than constructive, and may worsen the situation if it is left to be solved by punishment without cooperation,
      When I was called out, I wanted to be fully open, open it up, difficult as it was, but both my wife and I wish now that we both should have kept our mouths shut. What we did by exposing the act was ultimately right, but in doing so it opened us both up to the brutal response of the system, that went way beyond stopping the abuse to become a form of violence in itself. The state didn’t know how to step in and when to step out, which made life miserable for the children and us both. A system is morally just if it knows when to separate, but seeks to rejoin. Otherwise, a good portion of the nation is going to have a criminal record and be forever disadvantaged. And that will affect the poor and the otherwise dispossed more than the wealthy and famous we hear about. Then the social environment and the power imbalances that foster abuse will continue and grow like weeds in the disturbed dirt.

    • L.L

      Firstly, nice plug, as the STATIC-99R is indeed a scam!! But I will reserve my hostile opinions on the STATIC “assessments” for another day! Second, and as it relates to the Al Franken topic, I view Franken as having resigned as a form of, at least in part, self-sacrifice. Certainly his fellow Senators pressured Franken to resign for the “good of the party,” in hopes that Franken resigning will attract voters who, as Eric Knight says below, may see the Demorats as the more “good party.” Franken gets replaced anyway by a different liberal, and the hope is that by taking the high road, Trump/Moore staying makes it seem like the Republicans cradle and defend the unregistered sex offenders such as Trump and Moore. The problem is that many who identify themselves as Republicans and/or Trump supporters are so ideologically focused on achieving the current Republican agenda that Moore will win, Trump MIGHT gain popularity over time, and Franken’s resignation may not make much of a difference at the end.

  22. James

    Thank you Janice for this op-ed piece!

  23. Edie

    I want to believe that if hit with and made aware of all the facts, negatives, victimization, punishments, restrictions, real family accounts, etc. of this unconstitutional registry that these politicians and media members might pay attention to it (knowing they could be subject to it at some point) and see and support the necessary changes for complete reform and/or (hopefully) elimination. Sorry for the run-on sentence. My guess is that they believe they are all invincible and either know very little about this horrible registry, or believe that they are immune to it’s punishment. No one is above it, right Mr. Sandusky?? Mr. Weiner??

    Thank you, Janice, for all that you do!!

  24. Eric Knight

    Franken’s issue has a basis of truth as there is at least one photograph. And cupping a sleeping woman’s breasts is generally beyond sexual harassment.

    There are political considerations here as well. The Democratic Party wants to establish themselves as the “good party” so they are making all their candidates resign, as long as they are in venues where they control the person replacing him or her. This is part of a grander scheme in which Roy Moore, conservative candidate from Alabama, is removed from the race so the democrat can win and create a balance of power difference in the senate. Even if Franken resigns, he will be replaced by another progressive, so there is no loss of partisan difference, but the main goal is to attempt to take out Moore before the election on Tuesday or to discredit him so much that the Democrat wins in a state that they would otherwise have no chance.

    Unfortunately, the Moore sex crime accusers don’t have credibility as their stories have been falling apart, though Moore did date teens as a thirty year old legally. (Technically, dating any person of any age is legal, just not sex, but that’s another matter and is not part of this discussion.) Also, there are statute of limitations involved, though if it were proven beyond innuendo then it would destroy Roy Moore’s reputation just as much as if he committed the crime.

    Democrats in general play the long political game, and this was predicated on the Weinstein allegations, though they used this as an opportunity to cut the GOP’s senate lead in half which would hamper them the rest of the term should Moore not be elected into the senate.

    Ostensibly, they also want to get to Trump via “grabbing p***y” remarks, but Trump can’t be hurt by this. For now, Moore is the main reason why the Democrats are pushing their own out the door. Just sacrifices, like in chess.

    • RC

      The only thing is that it is not assured Franken will get replaced in the special election by a Democrat. Minnesota is a purple state, meaning the people could vote for a Democrat or Republican. True, currently both Senators and the Governor are Democrats. But look what happened in Democratic Massachusetts when Ted Kennedy died. The special election put in Scot Brown, Republican, into the seat now held by Elizabeth Warren.

  25. BL

    I’m a bit torn about this, for generally the same reasons I’m torn about the Brock Turner case. My opposition to the carceral state and my opposition to elite abuses of privilege and power are at odds here. In lieu of making an argument, which I don’t have time for this morning, I would posit that perhaps people like Franklin and Turner would be more willing to take full (or fuller) responsibility for their actions, wouldn’t rush to take advantage of their positions of privilege and power and instead be willing to make amends to victims, if total social death weren’t such an assured fate for those accused of sex crimes.

  26. Gralphr

    This was a great article, and should be on the front page of every newspaper nationally. This country really has opened a can of worms that will only get worse if not brought into the light.

  27. Nondescript

    They are resigning and retiring because the machine wants them gone or they were easy pickins to be sacrificial lambs for the broader agenda. And when your masters want you gone- you go. ( People who allowed into the elite circles are the most tracked and controlled people on the globe) It seems like most of the allegations against these men in media, entertainment, and politics are for ” inappropriate sexual misconduct” . I really don’t know what that means, but new legislation is already being crafted to criminalize it. Aggressively pursuing someone for a date? Uttering sexual innuendos to another adult? Will it become a crime for a man to initiate a conversation with a woman soon?

    On another matter, I was recently browsing through a very respectable and popular website people frequent, to read reviews on a movie I was thinking about going to see this past weekend and what pops up?

    “Alleged Pedophiles”. Catchy headline huh? I guess anyone can become a member of this site and add content ( kind of like Wikipedia) Anyway, before they listed the names and photos of 158 well known actors, directors and rock stars , they admit that they are “rumored” to be pedophiles, hebephiles and ephebophiles. This is a well known mainstream site, and they have a list of some of the most successful people ( all men) in the business- most haven’t been mentioned in the news.
    My first thought was how can a website just start shaming these people? It is truly scary what is going on, but I see it as part of a broader agenda . There is a war on men and it is not good.

  28. 1984

    Media convictions are killing our country. Once in the light, even acquitted, the accused person is done. This may be over simplified but I think we are over connected and addicted to “what’s next”?
    American society feels as it has been pre-programmed in a way that expected reactions to certain inputs are expected. If true, I sure would like to know and show who these group(s) are.

    Janice is great.

    • Tim Moore

      I think we have evolved to make quick determinations of other people and to temporarily segregate perpetrators of threatening behavior on a moment’s notice. I think for most of our history we have lived in groups of less than a hundred, and the opportunity arrised after a cooling off period to see the offender in a new light having learned a lesson and needs to be reinstated into the community. Now, besides within close knit families, redemption becomes nearly impossible. Once you’re ousted, you are forgotten, you exist as another anonymous monster listed on the web. You are what in medieval times one called a villain, one who had to wander between villages because he was not accepted in any. You are banned from the “protection zones” and exiled to the wild both physically and metaphorically. It is critical we develop close social and familial ties. Thing is the therapists tell us this, but the legislature throws everything they can in the way of this happening.

  29. G4Change

    This is awesome, Janice!
    Amen!!!

  30. Anonymous Nobody

    This rush to judgement on this topic is 100% being led and pushed by the women’s movement. I know I’m not ever allowed to say anything whatsoever against any women or a women’s movement as women can do no wrong, they do not need to exercise any responsibility for their actions or decisions, no repercussions to men or sentence is sufficient, not even death (see other story here about even death not sufficient for a sex offender), but I will speak regardless and just be ridiculed, accused, villianized, and ruined for life.

    This attitude is not the least bit new in the women’s movement. It has been the attitude on most every actual legislation they have sought for decades, very different from what they have said; what they say and what they do have been two very different things. They do not at all seek EQUALITY, which I am 110% in favor of. They seek domination, they seek rule and special privilege and entitlement. Anything you might find negative about any woman, her actions, her decision, her attitudes — it is the fault of men, not the woman.

    I know, you think I’m exaggerating. No, but I really wish I were, because it has brought us to the scary situation Janice is writing about.

    I saw, as one of the more recent examples, just a couple years ago in California when they changed the definitions in the laws on human trafficking, making situations that no one has ever considered to be that to now come under that law for prosecution and sentencing. Similar for the prostitution laws, all women who now themselves decide to go do that even on their own, who initiate solicitation, who take action to draw people in and “hook” them, are now deemed by law to be the “victim,” and the man they hooked, who never asked for it but got excited so said OK, is now the sole criminal, and the women are taken aside by police and they try to find ways to give the women money! This is insane. The idea is said to be that it is men’s fault the woman is a prostitute because it is decided that men have created the market for prostitution by ever having responded to the woman’s demand for money by paying it. This is insane! Women are always innocents in the lion’s den no matter what they do, what they decide, how they act, they are not responsible for anything bad no matter their actions.

    I earlier years, the women’s movement pressured police enough that they got them to not worry about the women, go after the men, and from then, it became far, far less common for the woman to be arrested, decoy police are all over luring in men to bust them, they don’t even bother to go after the women. Now they have gotten the law changed so women can’t be prosecuted for prostitution because by the presumption of law they are the victims, not the perpetrators, no matter their actual actions.

    This is not equality. This is the same attitude being complained about here in this thread.

    They have refused to go after the women for BDSM prostitution for decades, not even the ones involved in very sick and extreme things like slicing and bleeding men, and extreme torture. But I’m certain it would be different if a man were caught doing that.

    And you will be damned if you so much as ask, not even accuse, whether the woman had any amount of responsibility for whatever happened, as is the case with all these accusations of sexual harassment. There have been a couple people who raised questions, and they were so villianized by the women’s movement for simply raising a question, they were silenced under fear of their near destruction.

    And a lot more, but enough of the examples. The overall attitude that has taken hold from this push by the women’s movement is exactly what is being complained about in this thread. This is NOT new from the women’s movement — what they say and what they do are two very different things. The women’s movement has reached a very powerful position in America at this point. Anyone getting on the wrong side of the women’s movement now will be utterly, completely destroyed — as is being complained about in this article. Equality, fairness for all be damned, they taste blood and they are going for the kill.

    What we have going on now has been going on for some time, it has only now broken out and gone wild. If you had your eyes open, you will have seen this going on for many, many years now from the women’s movement, but for most, they must be overwhelmed by it as now before they can see.

    Hillary’s campaign was always the woman’s movement, her whole career has been. Everyone wants to keep saying how competent she is, but I always asked: What did she accomplish as Secretary of State, and the answer is always silence, and the look of shock on the face of the woman I ask — and that is exactly the right answer. The answer is NOTHING. And I then would follow up with: So then how does that qualify her to be President? No answer. But the answer and attitude of the campaign was by entitlement. She is the women’s movement, and she showed at every turn that she felt ENTITLED to be president. As such, the most offensive and obnoxious and idiotic candidate to ever come along, a candidate anyone in America should have been able to trounce without even campaigning, beat her. Even if Hillary won by 1%, that would have marked her as a failure against the likes of Trump, who should have been beaten with 80% of the vote.

    And the women’s movement went nuclear! They were denied their entitlement.

    Did you note, most immediately after the election, about a month and a half later, milliions were organized to turn out all over America for what was called the Women’s March last January — and all subsequent marches have stemmed from that. What organization could possibly have organized such a huge thing is so short a time? Well, the Clinton political machine coupled with the women’s movement — they are hardly even separable, and together they are the most powerful organization in America now. Don;t forget, Bill Clinon’s is the president who brought us national registration, under his Attorney General Janet Reno, who was always said to be Hillary’s choice. In other words, the women’s movement brought us national registration.

    They have not let up. And now it has morphed into these scary, instant, widespread determinations of guilt by mere accusation — anyone who dares to so much as ask if women might carry any responsibility is also condemned and villified, because a woman would never lie, she would never exaggerate, she would never manipulate, she would never be anything but an innocent in the lion’s den.

    And what this does mean and has meant for us is — we can never be redeemed. The women’s movement has only one sentence — complete, utter destruction, and if we finish out a criminal sentence, we will suffer their sentence as registrants for long, long times, no less than 10 years but don’t count on that for a minute — wait until you get the woman’s movement considering your application. That is why the woman’s movement made it an application, not your right after that time frame. Yes,I say the women’s movement, they were all over this, they are allover the points of power — we here keep wanting to credit Jackie Lacey (one of the more devious prosecutors out there), and just where do you think she stands about the women’s movement? That is why the women’s movement not only left misdemeanants suffering from registration, they actually increased the time for three misdemeanors from 7 years to 10 years in that bill (those three statutes violations could have gotten out of registration already under the same standard by getting a COR at 7 years, now they have to wait 10 years and still ask permission and meet pretty much the same standards anyway).

    Yes, I say the women’s movement, it was all over this, it is “infiltrated” (I know that sounds paranoid) through all the power centers now, including the ACLU (which somehow was in on the negotiations for this tier bill but WE were not — and I am not surprised to see this version coming from the ACLU, they have never fought the idea of registration, only an extreme part of it here and there), and the ACLU will NEVER propose anything better than the garbage fake tiers we got, which will leave tons of people of all charges out of even any hope of relief, and all others with only hope, no certainty — and those last I just mentioned are going to be very surprised, although more so in the second year of the tiers than the first. And wait until you see what these tiers now clear the way to do to registrants, who will now be portrayed as only the worst of the worst, even though they are all still suffering under it, even misdemeanants, for at least 10 years, because thee doesn’t even seem to have been any consideration of dropping misdemeanors and lesser felonies — an unconscionable failure of this bill, instead knowingly increasing from 7 years to 10 years for three misdemeanors.

    We completely blew our one and only opportunity — most of the people here were completely blind, including the leaders, and would not listen.

    And the women’s movement has now created an atmosphere that we can’t even speak in.

    • NPS

      Where is this “women’s movement” when it comes to placing women on the registry?

      • kind of living

        NPS,,,,, ,, friendly fire my friend , I remember many times that horn dog Judges would give probation to the lady’s in many cases because they were good looking , or the reason would be that they had children , but on the same charges men would get prison time and a boot in the ass for life , , and these men had children ,jobs , homes , I cant say that it was like all women’s movements or not , it always seemed to me that it was the double standard movement for a long time , hahaha ! I have been dealing with this crap for a long time like over 30 years , and I still have a weak spot for women doing hard time , and this lame registry , I have a daughter doing time back east , non sex related , drug related , and she has been down for 8 years and I feel so bad for her , but at the same time I did time with men that did a lot less time than she has for the same charges , and they were thugs while doing time , so I don’t know what is going on , I wish I could say , but I feel just as bad for you and anyone else that is stuck on this registry , no one belongs on this ,we are victims waiting to happen , good luck NPS , I hope you had a great Christmas , and I hope you fined that magic loop hole they are always talking about lol happy new year !

  31. Marie

    Please note that Al Fanken has yet to step down. He has only SAID he would.

    • kind of living

      @ Marie ,,,,, ,, Maybe he will take us all on a fishing trip on his vacation ! hahaha

    • RC

      Let’s hope he doesn’t . Already vulturing the seat is T-Paw, one of the biggest haters of registrants who acts like he has never heard of low registrant re-offense rates. I was hoping #MeToo would have consumed him like Roy Moore but instead he looks to be trying to benefit from it.

  32. Michael

    It’s a moral tsunami, and I am not talking about the moral tsunami that bible thumpers like to whine about [i.e. a “growing persecution” of the Church]. In this tsunami a person is accused — she said, he said — of something society considers heinous, and people come out of the woodwork to make an accusation [and pile on] which leads to others making similar accusations of some other person. Hard evidence is seldom present, yet people believe every word of it. And when someone such as Matt Damon point out that there is a difference between assault, harassment and jokes in poor taste, something Al Franken is guilty of, they get lambasted on Twitter. There is no legal requirement for proof of inappropriate or illegal activity before a person makes a public accusation, and once made, the accused is guilty until he proves himself innocent, and in many cases, regardless of what he says or does some people would have already formed an opinion based solely on the accusation.

    If it isn’t obvious, Americans have a problem with sex. Few places in the world are as prudish about sex and nudity as the United States. It’s almost a sickness in my opinion. It’s the reason our schools can’t educate students about it, and why the teen pregnancy rate is so high in the United States.

    Not sure how many people are aware of this, but there was a time in the United States that, although in most states it was 13, the statuary age of consent was as low as 10-years-old. [You’ll find an interesting article on this and other similar topics @ The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University, and the University of Missouri–Kansas City website here https://chnm.gmu.edu/cyh/teaching-modules/230%5D

    ….

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