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MO: Sex offenders register for a lifetime, but a bill would let some petition for removal

Almost all sex offenders in Missouri are on a state registry for a lifetime, whether they made a one-time mistake, or made repeated or extreme offenses.

Rep. Kurt Bahr, R-St. Charles, wants to make it possible for certain people to petition to remove their name from the list and for the registry to be more transparent for the public. Full Article

Join the discussion

  1. Facts should matter

    “Bahr said with the tiered system and clarification of sexual offenses in the bill, every sex offender will not be punished the same way.”

    Is anyone else dumbfounded with the sheer ignorance of this statement?

    it doesn’t MATTER the charge or what tier you fall under… the label – in and of itself – is an untenable, life destroying sad reality and hard truth

    • Joe

      I would call it “refreshing honesty”.

      This really gets me:

      “Glidwell’s fiance, Hannah Guffey, also testified and said the registry “is incredibly broken.” “While I am a proponent of having a registry, it is critical to be open to realizing that there might be a more effective way to distinguish between people who have made mistakes and people that have problems,” she said.”

      Sorry Sistah…. such is the beauty of the registry.

    • Michael

      I think after a certain amount of time if it’s the offenders first offense and he hasn’t reoffended that she should be removed from the sex offender list because I thought this was a country of Second Chances

      • CR

        A country of second chances? No. It is, and has always been, a country that is “tough on crime”. The tougher, the better, as far as most people are concerned.

        I don’t agree with you about removing first time offenders if they haven’t reoffended after some time. There should be no sex offender registry at all, and no one should ever be on it. Everyone who commits an offense is punished, sex offenders more than most in fact, and when that punishment is done, then the person should be free again. As free as anyone else. They should not be put on a public shaming list at all.

  2. Joe

    This caught my eye:

    “The DOC cost of incarceration is $17.003 per day or an annual cost of $6,206 per offender. ” (Bill Fiscal Note, p. 7 – https://house.mo.gov/billtracking/bills181/fiscal/fispdf/4083-03P.UPD.pdf)

    I read very recently that in California the cost of incarceration per inmate is now $80,000 per year. Compared to $6,206 in Missouri. Wow.

    Remind me to never get thrown in a Missouri prison. Or set foot in the Show Me State, for that matter.

  3. Someone who cares

    Wait – “will not be PUNISHED the same way?” Here I always thought it wasn’t punishment!!!!!

  4. David Kennerly, The Government-Driven Life

    When you consider how terrible a stay in California’s prisons is, I suspect that that $80K per inmate/year is not reflected in the conditions of confinement but rather in the bloated and overpaid bureaucracy that maintains it. Think of it this way: California gets to spend more money towards the goal of making prisoners especially miserable.

  5. Harry

    “Bahr said with the tiered system and clarification of sexual offenses in the bill, every sex offender will not be punished the same way.” PUNISHED, okay, lawyers put this in you evidence folder.

  6. Tim Moore

    Some get to petition off the registry for flashing, more get prison for life for statutory rape. Is this a good trade off? Doesn’t seem like it to me. Increase mass incarceration to reduce the severity of a registration system that protects no one. There is some sort of given equation here that overall punisjment must not be reduced, but reductions in one area require increases in another. This is the problem from the holistic perspective.These are our faustian choices today.

    • Joe

      This is the article I had read (almost a year old at this point)
      http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-prison-costs-20170604-htmlstory.html

      $75,560 – June 2017

      And of course the major driver of cost increase is salaries and medical costs.

      I surmise medical costs are going up as they do in general, but also with the aging of the prison population as these insanely harsh sentences of the past few decades are taking hold.

      In California there are few jobs where you can pull six figs with a GED. With a pension to match. Then again I would assume that a big part of a “good” prison is lots of staff, and well paid staff. Security as well as medical.

      On a somewhat unrelated note I also read an article (can’t find it) describing the devastating effects of the lack of Air Conditioning in prisons in the South. Apparently being in a constant state of overheating causes all kinds of problems and likely takes years off your life. Never thought about that…. along the lines of “if it is good enough for our troops in tents in the Middle East desert it is good enough for a bunch of criminals”. Not realizing that the troops have avenues for temperature relief, where the prisoner has none.

      Of course, this is all hypothetical, as I can guarantee that I will never be in a MO prison, as I have not and will never set foot in that state.

  7. 290 air

    What tier would the Gov of MO be on?

    • Richard

      I would think he would be charged with no less then Sexual assault a Class C Felony with abuse of power and threats to the victim he would be a Tier 3 and on life time registry! And why hasn’t this man been charged?

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