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SC: In wake of murders, calls for sex offender registry to go private

GREENVILLE, SC (FOX Carolina) – At its heart, law enforcement agencies across the country say that the sex offender registry is a great resource when used. For example, when people are moving into a neighborhood, or perhaps if they have questions about a neighbor.

“The sex offender registry is a tool, and it’s a tool for both law enforcement and the general public,” said Lt. Michael Hildebrand with the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office. “And just like every tool, when it is used properly, it’s a good thing.”

But Union County deputies said that registry was used as a tool for evil. Full Article

Join the discussion

  1. mh

    “Law enforcement maintains that the sex offender registry is a tool that is beneficial, and is largely used for informative purposes for communities, and it will likely remain that way.”

    Right, it will likely remain that way, even though people are being killed. I guess we call this an “acceptable risk”?

    • alert

      “Law enforcement maintains that the sex offender registry is a tool that is beneficial, and is largely used for informative purposes for communities, and it will likely remain that way.”
      I learned a long time ago that people believe what they want to and no amount of logical persuasion can change that fact until they are willing to listen.

  2. Brubaker

    Then why not listing for neighbors public safety protection from
    assaults..??….kidnappers..?…robbers..?….drunk drivers..?..spousal
    abusers …?..weapons..?…child endangerments..?..frauds..?…
    child abduction ..?……. .where’s that listing…?….public safety..???
    exoffenders deserve equal protection as those NOT listed……
    public policy is clearly in error and wrong by in effect welcoming
    those who commit assaults kidnap spousal abuse child abduct
    drunk drive frauds child endanger rob and more.

  3. DavidLM

    J.J Prescott a University of Michigan law professor did a study called…. “Do sex offender registries make us safe?” It’s a interesting read if you have not read it. I pled no contest to a high Misdomeanor sec offense and at the time it seemed little jail time and a fine would be best. I never would have no contest back in 2002 if I knew what the result would be. I worked my whole life and made about $40,000 a year before Adam Walsh. Now I fear violence and have to decide how to protect myself from violence from the registry. This family was murdered and his crime did not involve a minor. Much like him my crime happened over a decade ago. Vigilantes are not smart enough to research and the NY times said it best by writing… “Serial killers often attempt to justify their killing sprees, and they usually do it by dehumanizing their victims,” I find it interesting that Benjamin Franklin said… “He that would trade a little essential liberty for some temproary safety deserves naither safety nor liberty”…Benjamen Franklin. I know the registry is wrong! My deepest condolences go to this grieving family that is reading everything about the seenless slaughter from a serial killer.

  4. JohnDoeUtah

    Sex offenders in SC should sue, or at least these people’s survivors, the state for negligence. I’d use all statements by politicians in SC, highlighting the dangerousness of sexual offenders against them. Show the court that the State’s propaganda led to the murders. Offender’s cannot own firearms, and thus cannot protect themselves; plus, their whereabouts are posted publicly for all to see.

  5. Sazy

    My comment is more of a question. since, from where I sit, it is impossible for an so to have access to an unbiased jury, and hence the reason why plea deals are offered so widely, does anyone know if this has ever been challenged in court, as a violation of the sixth amendment rights, and if so, how far did it go? Once you have this label, or even if only accused, it seems it would be next to impossible to have an unbiased jury of your peers, unless the peers were also so(s).

    • td777

      This is why I accepted a plea deal. I was basically told after over a year in jail that I could accept the plea and go home that day(which I later found out home wasn’t an option since I was paroled to the wrong county and told I couldn’t live with my wife and child while on parole), or stay in jail fighting the case for as much as two or three more years risking jury trial on bogus charges. The county I was in has a 100% conviction rate on jury trials on sex related charges, and a 98% conviction rate on charges of any kind. I knew I had no chance in trial, regardless of the facts.

  6. Larry

    “Law enforcement maintains that the sex offender registry is a tool that is beneficial, and is largely used for informative purposes for communities, and it will likely remain that way”

    This is true; people that want to do harm to someone on the registry need only look on the registry.

    “Jeremy and Christine Moody told authorities that they targeted Charles and Gretchen Parker, because Charles was on the sex offender registry, and they were gunning for more sex offenders on the list”

    Jeremy and Christine Moody used for the purpose stated by law enfarcement. They got all the information they needed from the registry. They used it for informative purposes so they could commit murder. I hope they thanked adam walch and law enfarcement in the community they murdered in. I am thinking I want to escape this tyrrany and escape from america.

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