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TX: ‘Failure to register’ nets sex offender 60 years

A Willis man was convicted to 60 years in prison Tuesday for failure to register as a sex offender.

A Montgomery County jury in the 435th District Court found ___ ___ ___, 59, guilty of failure to register as a sex offender Monday, and District Court Judge Michael T. Seiler sentenced ___ to 60 years in prison on Tuesday.

“We are very pleased with the jury’s verdict and the judge’s sentence,” said assistant prosecutor Shanna Redwine. “Both the jury and the judge obviously appreciate the danger of having a convicted sex offender just roaming about in Montgomery County unsupervised.” Full Article

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  1. stephen

    It’s time to circle the wagons and fight back.

  2. noname

    If the registry is not punishment, then how can a crime be committed for not fulfilling the requirement to register. 60 years for not completing an administrative requirement is unjust and unfair. I bet the judge and DA smiled and patted themselves on the back saying what a service they did for such a good job at protecting the children.

  3. wonderin

    “Both the jury and the judge obviously appreciate the danger of having a convicted sex offender just roaming about in Montgomery County unsupervised.”
    “Sex Offenders are the most dangerous types of offenders and it is paramount that they follow the rules placed upon them for if or when they are released from prison,” said Redwine.

    And there you have it folks.
    The public is led to believe that dangerous sex offenders are controlled (supervised)and made impotent as long as they are listed and follow registry rules.
    What a simple yet effective program. (smile)
    No wonder everyone has gotten on board the registry train. choo choo!

  4. Joe

    So anyone here done any ‘unsupervised roaming’ today? Please report to the nearest police station.

    But hey, no need to go to Texas. FTR can be a third strike and result in a life sentence in this state.

    See here: http://www.leagle.com/decision/200528624CalRptr3d262_1265

    • Jason Wilson

      I’ve been “unsupervised” as soon as parole let me go. At that point, i was free to travel and while i don’t do a lot of travel, i’ve probably put a good 10k miles on the road since.

      Does this mean i am a dangerous, unsupervised roamer? I should turn myself in if that’s the case so i can get 60 years in the slammer while the with murder convictions continue to roam the streets without ankle monitors or lengthy parole… and no registry.

  5. nathan

    supervised? I didn’t know RSO were supposed to be supervised after they did their time..

    Im going to Fresno CA RSOL “unsupervised”

  6. Q

    Someone in Texas needs to step up and defend the laws and this victim of the registry against cruel and unusual punishment.

  7. G4Change

    Somebody please tell me that this can be challenged as “cruel and unusual punishment”!!! MY GOD…you can get drunk and kill someone with your car and get less time. This is insane!

    • Joe

      If you read the conclusion of the California decision I linked above you can see that life in prison under the 3 strikes law for FTR does, specifically, not amount to cruel and unusual punishment. In California!

  8. Alex

    Don’t you see the statement that says “Sex Offenders are the most dangerous types of offenders”, the ability of the texas legislature to determine what qualifies as a sex offense, its kinda like a group of people write someones name down and toss into a jar that says “sex offender”.

    Would the person get the same sentence for actually murdering a person or setting them on fire? Nope. The US is becoming a sort of dictatorship, the idea that a prosecutor has the authority to give someone a defacto “life-like sentence”, that doesn’t suit the criem.

  9. Steven Arnold

    I was convicted of 33.0921(b) in 2011. Now that it is ruled unconstitutional I get my life back, right?
    WRONG!!!
    I am led to believe that I have to hire an attorney to fight for release from what the CCA ruled was wrong in the first place.
    I have been reduced to living below the poverty line since the arrest in 2010. How in God’s name could I afford to hire an attorney at $10,000.00! Why do I have to go through the court battle to regain my rights?
    I didn’t do anything wrong and had no criminal intent all along. But that can’t be proven. Even the polygraph I have to take every 6 months can not prove intent.
    Texas is one messed up state!

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