ACSOL’s Conference Calls

Conference Call Recordings Online
Dial-in number: 1-712-770-8055, Conference Code: 983459

Monthly Meetings: Nov 21, Dec 19 – Details / Recordings

Emotional Support Group Meetings 2020 (Phone only)

National

Why single out sex offenders? Drug dealers, drunken drivers live among us

Letter to the Editor – This is in response to the uproar of a registered sex offender living in Allouez: I would rather know if a convicted drug dealer, wife beater or, for that matter, a person convicted of having DUIs lived next to me. They are not monitored such as a registered sex offender and therefore are not under as much scrutiny as the mentioned offender. Full Letter

Join the discussion

  1. Bluewall

    I say everyone in the US needs to be a registry… we already have cameras tracking us, cellphones and phones recorded… vehicles being tracked .. social media recorded and studied… tv habits studied…. and we have the largest recording group ever… NSA…

    It can be a big money industry the US can enter in.. sending citizen records overseas for telemarketing and marketing deals…

    • RWsMom

      These sex offender laws are already a money making venture in our country. Private prison racketeers are some of the reason we have over 759,000 citizens in this country on the registry and more still incarcerated! These private prison institutes help contribute to legislator’s campaigns! Look at Florida for instance, the worst state to live in to be accused of sexual crimes. Makes sense to me that Florida would be one of the worst, since GEO (a private prison company) is housed there! Most states have CONTRACTS with these private prisons to maintain a 90% or higher occupancy, if occupancy falls below that level, then the state is mandated to pay for maintenance and upkeep on that prison.
      Further, if the general public will investigate, these private prison companies have invested interest in companies that monitor (GPS) and provide MANDATED sex offense therapy programs.
      It’s a vicious cycle that is incarcerating more and more people for sexual offenses. Lawmakers write laws that makes it easy for innocent people to be accused. Media outlets get high ratings and money for printing or airing these stories. Our citizens sit incarcerated because they can’t afford attorney’s or their public defender cant adequately defend them because our Federal Government gives huge grants (Bryne Funds) to prosecutors to continue to fill these prisons!
      All the while, the American citizens are being told they are protected from sex offenders who 97% have been proven will never re-offend. What scares me, is they believe it!

  2. Q

    Hmm…. I thought we were the only ones that wondered why so much attention is focused on the individual convicted of one of the infractions on the ever expanding list of “sex” offenses; especially when our re-offense rate is tiny compared to the majority of crimes. I too would think people would be more concerned about drunk drivers, gang members and the like; but then again, most people don’t think. It seems they just want to be told what to believe. I think our dilemma is how to get this message/truth out when the media, for the most part would rather shout sensationalistic lies to their readers instead of acting as an unbiased entity and doing a little research and reporting on the results and conclusions of their research.

  3. RWsMom

    Thank YOU Ms Jensen! If the general public only knew how easy it is to get labeled as a sex offender, perhaps more people would be speaking out! Too many of our young men and children are going to prison due to an “accuser’s” statement to the police. Sex Offense laws have become easy weapons for our citizens and prosecutors to falsely accuse someone. Statistics prove that 39.6% of all accusations of sexual misconduct points to a juvenile UNDER the age of 18. These young kids have no future if they are labeled as a sex offender and placed on a public shaming list for the rest of their lives! They certainly are no threat to society or our children!

  4. Someone who cares

    Do these people know how many kids are being killed by not only drunk drivers, but by irresponsible drivers? That should worry parents more than a so called “sex offender” who will most likely not re-offend or whose offense had nothing to do with children in the first place. Then, there are the drug dealers, loitering at school and campuses to pass out drugs to the vulnerable, the children. Why don’t we put our focus on those who are the real threat? Are these people really worried about the safety of the children? It doesn’t seem that way as they completely disregard those groups as a potential danger to their beloved children. Wake up people!

    • j

      This law is not about public safety, it is about a mechanism to publicly shame and ostracize the registrant and the family.

      These same lawmakers don’t have the stones to do this to gang members and other violent criminals out of fear of retribution.

  5. Jason Wilson

    I’m glad we have the sex offender registries.. because it saved a school full of young people.. only one got killed today and the gunman is now dead. Oh wait.. the registry didn’t help here either.

    In my home town, cops keep arresting a guy who repeatedly almost kills a person. Last month he almost killed a man with a vicious attack on him. A few days ago.. he shot a man in the chest. He’s a 3 striker here in California and is a serious danger to the people in the community, yet he keeps getting out.

    Because he didn’t kill anyone and the jails are full, he will be back soon.

    Also in my home town, one of my friends had all his guns taken from him in a vicious home invation by law enforcement. He did NOTHING illegal, but he was dragged through the court system for 3 years, paying for laywers that turned out to be friends of the cops who did this to him. Just the other day, the broke state laws and gave some of his guns back to him… no appologies or clearence or notification to the state.

    Yesterday, i read in the news that a billionaire (with a B) who molested his step-daughter over many years got 4 months and will not have to register as a sex offender. They say it had nothing to do with his wealth. (Sure, whatever).

    I just got back from a short trip (4 days, counting driving time both ways) to my home town. On day 5 the former detective who kept messing with me showed up at my sisters’ house saying the reason he was there was that he had a report of a “prowler” and was checking on her to make sure everything was okay. (Bunch of lies). Turns out, this person used to be the person who registered me for many years… but i just learned he is no longer a Detective.. and now is a deputy. The reason he didn’t get fired was because my hometown Sheriff (the one who posted lies about me on facebook) was running for another term.. (He just won a 4th term in office as sheriff/coroner).

    BTW, when both his wives’ ex-wives died.. he was coroner. (That scares me). He’s on his third wife right now, too.

    Oh, and while i’m ranting i might bring up another issue that really bothers me…. something the registry didn’t help fix. I just read about a cop who was taking videos of people using the bathroom and posting those videos on a website he controlled.

    And we wonder why people are shooting at copes (Like in Vegas yesterday). Oh, i can’t say too much about my hate for this country because i’ll be treated like those people.. prob have secret service ripping me out of my home or something.

    All i want to see is justice restored, sane laws that keep this country civil.. people rights not being violated like it’s some fun game. I want things to be right in this world and i’m having a difficult time trying to un-see the garbage that’s been happening in this country since i started paying attention.

  6. Robert Curtis

    The acting-out of the mentally ill has been a strong force behind the registry (ie. the Adam Walsh Act). The push by the Orange County supervisors to enact Loura’s Law to help the mentally ill will curve violence by these people (ie. like the guy that shot-up my colleagues in a salon in Seal Beach). Supervisor John Moorlach was instrumental in this reform.

  7. hannah grace

    I agree. Why single out sex offenders? I feel the answer is simple. The “sex offender” is the most despicable person on the planet. NOT!!! I am so tired of people labeling SROs. They have made a mistake but are paying for it for the rest of their lives regardless of the severity of the offense. I would rather know who is getting in a car and driving repeatedly under the influence or the kid down the street that could entice my children to “sample” some of his “candy.” These types of offenses are more common and treated less harshly than the one-time offender who made a poor decision. With the wide range of sex offenses, there is no difference on how the offender is treated in California. The registry is a mechanism used to shame and destroy the lives of not only the offender, but their family members as well. There are many instances where the drunk driver has killed innocent people and were convicted. They serve their time and are released and are able to continue with their lives until the next time they get drunk. The same goes for the drug dealers. Nowhere are they stigmatized in society like the SRO. I think there needs to be a tiered registry, if one at all, and once the sentence is served let them continue their lives. The other problem I have is if the offense is considered incest committed by a family member, the offender is not made to register on the public registry. Why??? They want to protect the victim and the family. Why are they treated any differently than the other sex offenders?? What parent wouldn’t want to know who the parents of their children’s friends are? I am dismayed over the fact that there is no consistency in the sentencing guidelines, that sentencing guidelines are as harsh as they are, and the offender never really pays his so-called debt to society. I dream of a registry-free society. Now if my dream would only come true!!

Leave a Reply

We welcome a lively discussion with all view points - keeping in mind...  
  • Your submission will be reviewed by one of our volunteer moderators. Moderating decisions may be subjective.
  • Please keep the tone of your comment civil and courteous. This is a public forum.
  • Please stay on topic - both in terms of the organization in general and this post in particular.
  • Please refrain from general political statements in (dis)favor of one of the major parties or their representatives.
  • Please take personal conversations off this forum.
  • We will not publish any comments advocating for violent or any illegal action.
  • We cannot connect participants privately - feel free to leave your contact info here. You may want to create a new / free, readily available email address.
  • Please refrain from copying and pasting repetitive and lengthy amounts of text.
  • Please do not post in all Caps.
  • If you wish to link to a serious and relevant media article, legitimate advocacy group or other pertinent web site / document, please provide the full link. No abbreviated / obfuscated links.
  • We suggest to compose lengthy comments in a desktop text editor and copy and paste them into the comment form
  • We will not publish any posts containing any names not mentioned in the original article.
  • Please choose a user name that does not contain links to other web sites
  • Please send any input regarding moderation or other website issues to moderator [at] all4consolaws [dot] org
ACSOL, including but not limited to its board members and agents, does not provide legal advice on this website.  In addition, ACSOL warns that those who provide comments on this website may or may not be legal professionals on whose advice one can reasonably rely.  
 

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

.