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General News

PSA Child Porn Warning

A public awareness campaign to educate our young people as to what constitutes child pornography must begin now.

The lives of too many young adults are being ruined due to ignorance about the dangers of clicking on ANY porn site.

Please consider taking time to watch this 3 min PSA:

When is an adult not an adult?

When a teen poses to look like an adult as part of the dark web of child pornography.

More and more children, teens and young adults are looking at internet pornography out of curiosity about sex. And that’s how illegal porn websites often catch their prey.

But what if the adult in the porn is actually under age and only posing as an adult? In the eyes of the law, the viewer is still liable. The wrong click can end the viewer’s freedom for life in California for BOTH juveniles and adults caught by law enforcement.

Once you are convicted of possession of child pornography, you are listed as a California sex offender for the rest of your life. The law doesn’t apply just to offenders caught in the physical act. It also includes those caught “just looking” at under-age porn in the privacy of their own home.

California Code PC 311 is the fastest growing sex offense snagging our young people. Many times, they aren’t even aware of the law until it’s too late.

  • Over 400 men and women in California are convicted between the ages of 18 and 30 for PC 311 and are registered on Megan’s List.
  • 33% are ages 21-30 and 50% are ages 30-39.

Please join us in the fight to prevent another lifetime sentence due to ignorance and innocence about the rapidly growing dangers of the dark web.

 

Join the discussion

  1. Facts should matter

    “The law doesn’t apply just to offenders caught in the physical act. It also includes those caught “just looking” at under-age porn in the privacy of their own home.”

    And therein lies the problem with Megan’s Law. The original legislative intent was circumvented to include CP as a registerable offense. Possession was once only a misdemeanor, but that all changed with the “tough of crime” approach that lawmakers run their campaign platforms on.

    • Joe123

      It SHOULD have stayed as a misdemeanor because that is logical sense on every level.

      Unfortunately, we have power tripping psychopaths as Lawmakers, making a good name for themselves by passing unnecessary laws that make them look good while unnecessarily harming thousands of people.

      Those Lawmakers are the ones who deserve to go to Jail for this travesty.

  2. Jack

    Jesus christ these people are sexist. I mean look at what they’re telling these kids. “if you make pornography of yourself, you’ve broken the law too” You know what that means? If a man coerces a kid into making child pronography of themselves, the kid can’t tell anybody. It’s crazy. It’s just like our approach to prostitution. Prostitute’s raped, she can’t tell anyone about it.

    • AO

      Yup. You have a crap shoot as to how the DA will prosecute the case. A good DA will see it for what it is and not prosecute the kid. But a bad DA that only cares about the letter of the law in the strictest sense possible, will just see it as something to pad their resume.

      • Dustin

        @ AO:

        Respectfully disagree. All DA’s, good or bad, care only about convictions. Everything else is a very distant second. Not much of a crap shoot – they’ll only drop a case if they’re less than 95% certain to get a conviction. An accusation is all that’s needed to convict for a sex offense these days, so don’t expect any of them to get dropped.

        Don’t expect help from most attorneys, either. Most will take your money, but few actually want to win your case. They don’t want to be “the guy who got that child molester off.”

      • rosebud

        Couldn’t disagree more. Laws are supposed to be written so that they apply to everyone. Laws that, absent prosecutorial discretion, criminalize entire segments of the population are simply bad laws.

    • rosebud

      Totally apples and oranges. Rape is always a crime, regardless of the victim. Comparing that to taking photos of oneself is absurd.

      Of course, if an adult coerces some kid into serving as the lookout for a gas station hold up, the kid is prosecuted, and prosecuted as an adult. Because s/he is expected to know better. For his failure to resist the coercion he is slapped with a gang enhancement on his way to LWOP in adult prison.

      That’s what I find crazy.

    • Jack

      Sorry, these laws* are sexist.

  3. Jack

    Well rosebud you can disagree with it all you like but to prosecute a child for production of child pornography is absurd, and that’s exactly what this PSA is telling them.

  4. Nicholas Maietta

    I’ve been a hosting provider since 1999 and around 2001 I started an Internet Services Provider in my home town after having worked in others before. Almost immediately after my company went online, we received an in-person visit from a 3-letter agency trying to tell my partner (who has since passed away) that we had to install a piece of equipment to combat child pornography and terrorism activity. The only reason I can discuss it now is that I was not the one under the gag-order. Luckily at the time we were a virtual ISP, not a physical one. We resold connections we bought at wholesale, otherwise we would have been forced to install the equipment under a court order. We maintained no on-premise physical equipment other than an email and DNS server.

    The system in question is Carnivore:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnivore_(software)

    I empire everyone to be careful with VPN providers as I suspect most are setup for catching illegal activity. (How else did so many VPN’s pop-up out of nowhere in such a short time?). Most VPN providers are untraceable and are operated by shell companies that don’t really exist.

    Also, the Electronic Frontier Foundation has a free tool called HTTPS Everywhere. Use it. If you operate a website in which users access data, ensure that you have an SSL installed and enforced for all traffic to prevent this kind of traffic sniffing.

    If you must use a VPN, build your own with a cheap VPS account at Vultr, Linode or Digital Ocean. You can get a cheap VPN going for about $3.50/mo-$5.00/mo and you can route all your traffic through this.

    Another major thing you should be doing also is changing your ISP’s DNS servers to something else like CloudFlare’s 1.1.1.1 and 1.1.0.0 or Google’s public DNS servers 8.8.8.8 and 4.4.4.4 in your computer’s settings or in your home or office routers. These providers will offer untainted DNS whereas ISP’s are notorious for getting hijacked.

    There are other steps you can take, but i’m simply pointing out that this sniffing of traffic on the general public has been happening for a very long time.

    • Joe123

      Nicholas Maietta,

      What you just said is damn frightening. I knew the US was doing a lot of shady dealings like this, but I wasn’t aware of this particular one.

      I’d suggest using TOR over a VPN that is established overseas and is known for not keeping any logs. That’s probably the only way to ensure any privacy these days. Express VPN is one company in particular.

      These agencies have WAY too much funding to be spending time doing this.

      • Nicholas Maietta

        Tor has it’s limitations and sadly, operating a Tor exit node can put a person at risk for legal liability. I’m still awaiting for the dust to settle before operating exit nodes. By operating an exit node, you help others route traffic through your nose and help build the Tor network even bigger. Sadly though, not all Tor exit nodes take steps to prevent snooping and if you control enough of them, you can connect the dots between IP’s to figure out who visited what sites and accessed what resources. I am almost certain our government operates thousands of exit nodes to do just this.

        There are also issue with Tor that are not so obvious. The effort to cover all attack vectors is a strong one and the results so far are pretty good but if you are really paranoid, you really need to do your due diligence and follow all best practices when using these tools.

  5. Laura

    Great video! It tells the true story even if some organizations don’t want society to know who is actually on our Registry.

  6. Joe123

    LOL, this video. Showing the Police State at its finest. We only have voters to blame for allowing this to happen.

    You don’t have TIME to be outraged when you’re working several jobs.. Or watching ESPN and Kardashians. It takes brain power to actually follow the injustices constantly happening in this country. Can’t do that when your life is just Work and Entertainment.

    At what point will Lawmakers, and people of Authority in general, get it through their damn skulls that just because you WANT kids to not be sexual until 18, that doesn’t make Mother Nature give a D*mn. It doesn’t work that way! Have they ever stepped outside of their brainwashed close-minded bubble and asked themselves why menstruation starts at a young age? Is it just for the hell of it because Nature doesn’t know what the hell it is doing? Or how about those countries with much lower Ages of Consent? OR how about the Psychologists/Researchers that have gone on record to make it CRYSTAL CLEAR that people under age 18 still know what they are doing. People under 18 have brains that are fully capable of making decisions despite their hormones taking priority in decision making. Isn’t that an inconvenient truth that Americans don’t want to hear which the rest of the outside world is aware of?

    We have made it through thousands of years without this being an issue. Now SUDDENLY in the last 20 years or so, we’re running out of Easy Crimes to Convict, yet we have a massive Law Enforcement presence. You have to keep those jobs going somehow, right?? So why not criminalize everything so you can forever keep Law Enforcement employed along with prisons/prosecutors/judges! BRILLIANT idea!

    • James

      LOL…Joe…lol:

      I’d write something but I’d better not…let me just say…nothing.

      Grin…(but I am biting my tongue…I think you’re correct, and I’ll leave it at that)

      Everyone be good.

      Best Wises, James

  7. Asterick

    Evidently, the PSA was produced by ACSOL and thank you for that. The ultimate moral of the story seems to be, never view any porn because that is the only way to ensure safety.

    CP is the most mysterious and therefore complex crime if you ask me, and nobody asked me. But there it is. The public never sees the evidence and so is never enlightened on what to avoid. This is especially troublesome because there are separate laws for viewing, downloading and distributing it. After viewing it a person might never know if in violation until it is too late and the charges are multiplied.

    Is CP on the clear web or is it only on the dark web? The PSA seems to claim arrest is certain in either case. I would think any CP on the clear web would be reported almost instantly and therefore the various porn sites would be safe. Not true? Has anyone been convicted of CP when found accidentally on clear web porn sites, like for example pornhub.com? There are groups that police the dark web as well, so I would think unless specifically clicking on an obvious CP .onion site it would likely be monitored enough to be safe. Not true? Aren’t those sites the ones the FBI tracks and maybe controls?

    Nobody wants to get charged with CP and it is difficult to see how taking that risk would be worth it, but adult porn sites get a lot of the highest traffic. Are there millions of sex criminals now? Seems to me self-censoring all porn is not the best and fairest solution. Is that really the only way to be safe? It is important because some studies found porn to be a crime prevention solution.

    • Bend Over - Florida Owns Your Ass For Life!

      Don’t forget that the government has actually RUN CHILD PORN sites to entrap users. Let that sink in…that’s basically the same thing as the government selling real drugs out of a house and arresting people who come in to buy them.

      The government actually creates the vast majority of “sex offenders” by either entrapment or laws that have victim-less crimes like age of consent cases, busting gays cruising parks, sex workers and their clients, and many others.

      The vast majority on sex offender lists are of no danger to anyone – including children and are criminals simply because they are low hanging fruit easy to catch and because sex is the biggest taboo in the United States being a christian nation of hypocrites.

      • AnotherAnon

        Exactly right, and after over 20 years on the internet (very slow way back when!) I have yet to see child porn. I do watch porn because I didn’t sign up to be a Catholic priest, and how did that workout anyway? I decided long ago when the laws escalated not to drag a girlfriend or wife into this mess so if you try sometimes, you get what you need. I use a vpn and Tor sometimes to beat the stalkers but rarely visit .onion sites and never click on CP sites, nor do I click on hit man for hire sites, lol, no matter how tempting.

        Hard to believe CP was legal to posses before the ’70s. I never saw any of that either. I wonder if that is what the FBI uses.

  8. Will Allen

    Nanny Big Government (NBG) ought to be legally required to run continous PSAs for any of their “laws” which are asinine. NBG truly is a danger to the citizens that pay them. Most of the “people” in it are scum bags who are drawn to corruption.

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