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We spend billions after child sexual abuse happens and nothing to prevent it

For weeks, the nation has been gripped by details surrounding Jeffrey Epstein and his child sex-trafficking operation. An operation uncovered more than a decade ago but badly addressed by prosecutors. Last year we learned that Larry Nasser continued to sexually abuse child athletes for 20 years after the first accusations surfaced against him. Opinion

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  1. Bo

    How much money is spent on “treatment” for offenders on release from prison?

    Seems not to do much

  2. Tim

    The leadership spent billions on the domestic surveillance infrastructure on the justification of sexual assault – the most common form of domestic terrorism. Theft of one’s children is a parents worst nightmare, even given it is the state itself who takes them away. It was also the sex offender who justified states DOCs to begin putting all convicted persons on the www. States publish many things online today most of which is helpful, while SOR is still in reality a collateral attack. Today it is commonplace to find individual citizens engaged in attacking each or one another via the web. Today those on the list know it was always intended to create a way to re-read encarcerate. They were successful as countless FTR have ensued subsequent to enactment. Honestly, we’re the kids ever going to be protected through the use of database machine without imposing affirmative restraint first upon the registrants – impossible. Billions spent alright, but for political security via domestic electronic surveillance and data collection and analysis. We give grade schoolers ipads while the Chinese kick their butts in math and science scores starting theirs with an abacus. 22.5 T
    And 1T annual deficit paid for by future generations. So sad am i.

  3. Facts should matter

    Public opinion is the real source of decay when it comes to any progress. It impedes a collective progressive mindset and holds us back. Anything sex-related abuse in America, the outcry is always vengeance, hate and retaliation, so prevention falls by the wayside. No matter how sound the logic, emotions will forever override any semblance of preventative goals.

  4. TS

    Did anyone see this “Previously convicted sex offenders account for just 5 percent of all new sex crimes.” according to para 6 of the article which sounds much like the data that is currently espoused. We know that is rounded up, but it is NOT “frightening and high”. Wow! It is known this publication is read by those on the Hill proper so maybe someone will look into that up there.

    As for the rest of the article, this needs to be incorporated into parenting classes since that is where a majority of the statistics are, e.g. family, etc, for this topic. Once they do that, then they may start to get a hold on this because the rest of the people related entities shown in the article are NOT family, but others who fall into other statistical areas, e.g. coaches, organizational leadership, et al

    • CR 3

      Yes, I noticed that. I was going to comment about that 5%/95% comment, but you already did. Thank you.

      The author of that article is one who knows the the truth, who has written before on the subject, who knows that continually persecuting those who have committed crImes in the past is not a way to prevent sexual crimes in the future (statistically proven), and that it doesn’t make anyone safer. I wouldn’t say that she is on our side, but rather that she is one of the few who are truly on the side of potential victims of sexual abuse, because she understands that the greater risk is in failing to identify and address the factors that enable abuse to occur in the first place. Whatever that is, I don’t know, but I’m sure that the majority of attention and study should be directed there, and not on pretending that those who have already been brought to justice are the only ones who society should fear. That just provides cover for those who have not yet been stopped, who are presumed to pose no risk until it is too late.

    • ReadyToFight

      Trumps a businessman… he should take a look at what the Registry REALLY is and what it COSTS.

    • No way out

      Yes the # is 5%, but that 5% is also misleading due to the fact that those people are committing very serious offenses. Again, the masses are suffering for the sins of the very few.
      As for investing in prevention, there is more money to be made in PROSECUTION vs PREVENTION. Why else is there still such a terrible drug problem almost 50 yrs after cocaine was introduced to U.S. as a profitable enterprise. Crime is a revenue stream. Better than taxes!

      • R M

        @ No Way Out: “Yes the # is 5%, but that 5% is also misleading due to the fact that those people are committing very serious offenses.” I wouldn’t say the numbers are misleading; I’d say the media and government are publicizing what they want to make the country “think” it’s worse than it is.

        This citizens of this country, the USA, have been mind manipulated in a big way. Not only about sex crimes, but also about drugs, what the USA has done to civilians, the climate, oil, wars, etc etc etc.

        Yes, it’s about money for a few and power for a few.

      • TS

        This is why DARE and Just say no never worked. Favorable optics only for those who need it. No one ever intends to do drugs until they get some however they do and then it could either stop or continue to escalate through gateways.

        When gov’t wants to prevent things like this, they use the fallacy of stranger danger when in reality they need to be telling families in parenting classes what to be aware of, etc, but no one wants the gov’t telling them how to raise their kids. That is what the schools are for, right? Heck, sex ed is a hard enough topic to get some sort of concurrence on today. Goes back to the home life.

        When kids are sent off to these Olympic training areas, why are they not warned then when they get there? This is not a summer camp, but even then warnings should be posted next to the weekly menu on the bulletin board like a summer camp.

  5. David

    When was the last time you saw a prosecutor stand before several microphones and wax eloquent about a successful prevention program? That’s right, never! They build their careers (and future political careers) by being tough on crime. Same for LEOs – it’s their moment in the glorious spotlight when they get to perp walk an alleged sex offender. Now why in the world would they wish to support a prevention program that could negatively impact their career-building press conferences?

  6. AJ

    Another op-ed in another major DC newspaper that talks more for our side than for the other. Chip, chip, chip. Chips coming off the lies and the wall!

  7. NorthEastPENN

    Hardly any money is ever spent on the prevention of sexual abuse of children only and mainly because most of society is under the false belief that “once a sex offender always a sex offender” – so the thought is “why spend money on something that can never be fixed or avoided”.

    A friend of mine heard a cop in our town refer to the Megan’s List for Penn as “Megan’s ‘Pedophile’ List” – stating everyone on the list is a child-molester. So even law enforcement is spreading the wrong thoughts. So until we start spending money on educating people first spending money in other areas may not be as effective.

    • TS

      @NE Penn

      Then someone can add in the conversation with them “Do you know how many of those on the list are former LE because statistically they are part of the problem too?” Bet they don’t answer or say another thing about it.

  8. Grant

    Not about spending money it’s about Standing up and forcing people who are spreading lies to be held accountable and GREAT NUMBERS ARE NEEDED TO STOP THE MADNESS… BECAUSE IT HAS BEEN ALLOWED.. .AND .APPROACH WAS WRONG FROM THE START….FROM ALL ORGANIZATIONS….. THE LONGER IT IS ALLOWED OR FOUGHT THE WRONG WAY THE HARDER IT IS TO STOP !

  9. Bill

    @TS

    Not only LE’s are joining that growing cancer of a list we call the Registry but politicians as well. Former Rebublican Pennsylvania State Senator Mike Folmer has recently been charged with possession of child pornography. And let’s NOT forget Anthony Weiner as he too is signed on to the Registry.

    Ironic for Weiner that he use to call LE and complain about sex offenders living too close in his neighborhood.

    Welcome to Pariah Land Weiner! And you too Folmer! Time to swallow your own hypocricy!

    Maybe after years of putting up with the injustices of the Registry you former politicians will you see what is wrong with our system and maybe use your political skills to make changes.

    Now there’s an idea…

    • TS

      @Bill

      Yes they are. We know both are slimey and use what they can to get out any sort of bad optics when it comes sex offenses and being caught. There’ll be more.

  10. US citizen

    Three times between 18 and 20 I attempted to get help for my thoughts. I was rejected all three times. One example is a Catholic free service that was fine seeing me until the second meeting when I said what my issue was at which point they said I was not Catholic and they mainly just see Catholics. 40 years later I have so much information on how to help those who are just seeing an inclination. There are so many ways to help direct the young mind where there’s a risk of doing something stupid or illegal. Learning to practice healthy sexuality is one good way to deal with inappropriate thoughts

  11. ab

    The reason billions are spent after an offense (any offense) comes down to money. It is tragically far more profitable to invest in treatment, justice, rehabilitation, recidivism, victim advocacy, tracking, monitoring, parole, home confinement, probation, fines, restitution, supervised release, prisions, jails, courts, investigative teams, law enforcement, and all other things connected to the legal system than actually preventing crime. Effective crime prevention isn’t a function of law enforcement or courts, it’s a social structure that significantly leads people away from ever getting close to being involved with criminal activity in any capacity. Over time it is no longer about stopping something that will happen the next day, week, month, or year, but years and decades away. Take the very beginnings of someone or a group going down a worrisome path and intervene way before anything truly bad occurs.

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