ACSOL’s Conference Calls

Conference Call Recordings Online
Dial-in number: 1-712-770-8055, Conference Code: 983459

Monthly Meetings: May 16 – Phone [recording], June 13 – Phone, July 11, August 15 details
Oct 10 and 11 – Conference (Los Angeles),

Emotional Support Group Meetings 2020 (Phone only)

2020 ACSOL Conference – Postponed to Oct 10-11

Janice's Journal

Janice’s Journal: The Stage Is Set, But Will the Players Play

California Governor Gavin Newsom has set the stage for the end of in-person registration during the COVID-19 pandemic.  He did so by issuing an Executive Order that authorizes and encourages law enforcement agencies to remotely register individuals telephonically and by other means.  The reason for these remote procedures, according to the Order, is to protect both law enforcement personnel as well as registrants.

We acknowledge that the Governor’s order is a suggestion, not a mandate.  There are no penalties for law enforcement agencies that choose to disregard it.  But the fact remains that remote registration is the only humane method available during this global pandemic.

Registrants must be protected from the threat of COVID-19 infection that exists at every registration site.  That threat is found on surfaces such as chairs, counters and clipboards touched by countless others.  That threat is also found on paperwork they are required to sign.  The greatest threat, however, is experienced during the photographing and fingerprinting processes when registrants are required to remove their face masks and gloves and are even exposed to human physical contact.

The Governor wisely addressed the topic of fingerprints and photographs in his Order.  While recognizing that fingerprints and photographs are required by state law, the Governor has suspended that requirement for 60 days.  It is a suspension that could and should be extended in future orders.

The timing of the Governor’s Order is late.  That is, more than two months have passed since the COVID-19 pandemic was declared.  And during that time, it is estimated that more than 10,000 people have been required to register in person.  More than 10,000 people may have been exposed to COVID-19 and more than 10,000 people may have, in turn, exposed their families to the virus.  As of this date, their rate of infection is not yet known.

What is known is that the judges and justices that will make decisions in cases challenging in-person registration that are now pending in several California courts must consider the Governor’s Order.  Those judges and justices cannot in good conscious allow law enforcement agencies to reject remote registration because it is an administrative burden.

How can anyone declare that saving the lives of more than 109,000 registrants and their families as well as law enforcement officers is a burden?  Instead of a burden, remote registration should be seen as a vital mission, a mission of compassion.  Law enforcement officials that view the opportunity to remotely register individuals as a burden do not deserve the government pay that they receive.

 

Join the discussion

  1. Tim in WI

    Yes ACSOL,
    Our leadership is traditionally satisfied with getting to enforce the laws as they see fit, and not when they see fit to do so. For example many states have laws on the books making it a crime to wear facial coverings in public places. With Covid being in play most will ignore those laws because of the contagion, yet the law on the books is the law right? Why is the current administration and situation be any different. Law enforcement will play ball; Aaaaaaaannnnnnd how!

  2. alienated

    Janice and all Who helped, Another huge Victory
    Thank you!!!

    BTW why is it every year they take fingerprints do fingerprints change from year to year?

    • E

      Fingerprints are to make sure it’s really you. (No kidding.) So nobody else comes in and registers on your behalf!! LOL

      • wonderin

        “Fingerprints are to make sure it’s really you.”

        A big lie from the police, its all about harassment.

        A simple glance at your drivers license would do.
        There’s all the paperwork and ink finger prints and after that there’s all the computer finger prints which always take multiple attempts and finally a photo, about 30 minutes combined with having waited for an hour or two in line and seated in the crowded lobby. We are (booked) every time we go in and everyone gets makes money and if we’re lucky you get a thank you for coming in.

        • someone who cares

          Fingerprints to proof it’s really you who registers? That is the biggest BS I ever heard. The fingerprints are done at the very end, after all the paperwork is filled out. Why would they waste their time if at the end it might not even be you who filled out the paperwork? So stupid.

        • Will Allen

          @someone who cares:

          I’ve been told that fingerprints can change somewhat over time. People also have accidents that affect them. Or do things to change them on purpose. But are fingerprints important at all? Of course not. The Registries aren’t important. They aren’t needed and they aren’t beneficial. Why would fingerprints be needed?

          People Forced to Register are not committing $EX crimes. Further, most $EX crimes are committed by people known to the victim. And DNA is a billion times more useful and easier to use. The number of instances where fingerprints would be useful is just insignificant.

          But what is even dumber than that is the duplicated paperwork. So dumb.

          Where I live, a PFR must write down again all the information that the idiotic criminal regime ALREADY HAS!! It is well over 10 pages and I expect they store those hundreds of thousands of pages somewhere. Likely forever! Brilliant!

        • TS

          As the body ages, change happens which printing tracks on the fingers and hands over time in addition to scars on the hands. But to prove it’s you at registration, whatever….

          You could do a retina scan too for proof but I digress…

      • TS

        @E

        If prints prove it’s you, then why bother with showing my state provided ID with my mug on it? Why not take my DNA each time since that’s real proof in the same vein as prints?

    • jm from wi

      My best fingerprint story… While checking in in Las Vegas for the 2nd visit in a year I asked why take my prints again (in Wi. we don’t do prints). The clerk at intake said that it’s in case there are changes. I asked “like what?” She responded “like in you got a finger cut off’.

      • TS

        Would make sense if the digital scan file of the prints was one data package for the record and needed to be updated with a newly missing digit; but continually is illogical (even with cuts which heal unless scars are evident).

      • w

        Yep, just in case fingerless crime becomes a thing. So they can match you up to a finger you don’t have anymore…

        Oh wait she was serious?! And the taxpayer foots the bill so she can grab a Starbucks latte afterward?!

      • Love, peace, and fuck you

        My best fingerprint… middle finger up and extended.

      • Adama

        Let’s go with that logic and say they’re right. You have one finger missing and they get a print off another. Don’t they get a print off all 10 fingers during felony booking as well as all sex crimes? That’s what I remember. Also, I know Nevada gives out of state visiting registrants only 48 hours to register in Nevada, so I can understand you registering in NV for a few days of enjoyment in sin city, but do they take your name off the list once you leave? Unlike in Florida and even your own state WI I heard. Personally, I wouldn’t chance staying in any state pass the time limit required for visitors to register.

        • jm from wi

          I registered as a visitor before I knew about some other states besides Florida keeping lists after you leave. Subsequent research seems to say they do not keep you registered. (I’ve also looked myself up on they’re list and am not there.

  3. Saddles

    While I’m just glad the Gov of Calif. did the right thing. And yes if Janice and her team took this measure to stand up than its a blessing in many ways . While the article said: maybe a bit too late but its on the books. Talk about safety in numbers. Of course this is a pandremic that came up in a very unusual but it does have a meaning behind it I’m sure.

    Sure no one was prepared for this virus. Seems like the last person or person’s to be excluded from this are those that are on the registry, those in prison or those that are defaced by society. Two wrongs don’t make a right than what makes a right – or is it women and children first. I just hope this calls attention to authorities. Pandermic or not people shouldn’t go to jail because some police officer did a bait trap on them with this registry hi- jinks. Even going to jail without wearing a mask or fined is a bit to much.

    I am afraid computers are used in diabolical ways today and the registry is one. One has to say honesty is the best policy. One don’t even know if they are wearing masks in a courtroom today to cover up. Governments are covering up a lot today and its time for America to awake. Even much of this registry could tell a story of law corruption in many ways. Yes theirs good and bad in everything. If the registry is for safety than this pandermic is telling one something.

  4. Kaliya Yaab

    Just playing devil’s advocate…

    Is it possible the combination of remote registration and technology, makes registration “so easy and painless,” that we will see an explosion of registrable offenses? And I’m not just talking about sex offenses, either. I can see the possibilities, for a HansensLists.com website!

    • TS

      @kaliya

      There already is but this could make it easier.

    • kind of living

      “or (1) constant check in’s every month” Or (2) “constant tracking” Oh wait they are already doing 2 , along with of other spying tactics . I have a brand new idea ! how about just put an end to the registry ! I Know Right ?

  5. dph

    Thank you Janice and The Team on this one.
    p.s. I sent an letter three weeks ago since reading your article and thought
    I watch him and his Doc and Emgerg Mgr on Noon on local channels live.
    Send a letter and request assistance if this is REALLY A PANDEMIC he will faulter.

  6. Saddles

    @ Kaliya, playing the devil’s advocate. You have a very good point. Janice is a smart lady and so is many on the team. Their is a reason for in person registration but their is also a reason, but putting one in jeapardy is not a safety factor. Nothing wrong with protecting and serving but one is dealing with a Convid at this time that is effecting the nation and “Killing” in the wake. Also two types of sex offenders one is induced, one by internet means and one is physical so who’s playing who in this intoxic game of spin the bottle. At times every picture tells a story. Enticing with evil appears to be a playing motiving in many cases.

    Nothing wrong with registering by computer or telephone during this Convid period that is effecting the whole nation. Sure an internet encounter is bad enough Police putting one in a position of a sexual nature is a bit out of character when it all comes down to understanding all this. I’m sure men and women still have a “thorn in the flesh.” Authorities seem to be over riding in much of this debauchery type internet ordeal to try another person’s patience or gettings one’s goat.

  7. Worried in Wisconsin

    Fingerprints prove nothing, at least not with regard to registration.

    Even if it is you that shows up to fill out the forms, in no way does it prove that anything you put on the forms is correct, that you actually live where you say you do, or that you work where you say.

    And if one of us is able to find someone that looks similar enough to pass for us using our photo ID and they fill out the forms, is it any more or less accurate?

    Here in Wisconsin, most of us just send a card back once a year. I only go in person when my name comes up for a photo update, every three years or so. That takes about 5 minutes at the local PO office.

    No one has been able to show me even one benefit to public safety from in-person registration. To me, it’s all about making the powers-that-be look more ‘tough on crime’.

    • Tim in WI

      Worried in WI,
      The photographs were not part of registration process in beginning. Instead a ” general descriptions ” we’re used. It was promulgated by the advent of digital cameras that made the photos cheap enough to use them as part of the database machine infrastructure. However the ONLY reason why in person reporting component was added had to do with the desire for pictures. Politicians couldn’t help themselves and the passed laws requiring the necessity for In person reporting. Early on Illinois sent agents to registrants homes to acquire the pics. I was employed in Rockford, IL, but I resided in WI so when the agent showed up at my place and demanded I stand for the picture, I demanded he leave my property immediately. He threatened me with various potential consequences, arrest, telling WISOR of my refusal etc. but nothing ever came of it. Too often they get away with that crap because registrants just give in.

  8. Neil

    Good column – informative and well reasoned. Thank you for focusing on this issue, Janice.

  9. Saddles

    The stage is set, but will the players play or what does this mean? Players only play you when they can play you. I didn’t much like that song so is it time for a new song. So who’s DNA is splattered over a milk carton today. I would even think all milk cartons are plastic today so who is tripped up by this dust in the wind.

    Are we all guilty……YES, is Government guilty…..YES Are we the people guilty…….YES or should we just play up the great escape and blame it on computers, or Steve McQueen or the devil made me do it, or how about the tongue, and yes the tongue can get one into trouble or who is mouthing off to much.

    Now Josh told me to knock it off and yes we can all run our mouths and believe me govenment does enough of that. Look at the kayos in America in the last 60 yrs. or even longer. Segregation, the hippy movement, transgender movement, women’s lib, the computer era, taking pray out of schools, presidents coming and going, even the women’s rights vs the soccer mom’s and even Remington Steele which one has to understand those man made adventure of doing a crime to preventing a crime in a law firm game. Could governments be doing that. Would be sort of diabolical.

    I thought I was complaining but we are are uptight about all this registry ordeal. I guess one may be looking now for RegisterGate instead of a WaterGate now or is a protest the social norm.Vietman was a frightful in unforgetable ways and I’m sure this registry is just as pandemonius in many ways.

    I believe they’ll play, or where is the widsom of this world and yes the wisdom of this world is folly.

  10. Ed C

    I registered last week by phone. Quick, easy, painless and safe. If that practice continues for some length of time, we might get another useful statistic. If there is not a spike in recidivism–which I doubt there would be–any argument for the utility of in person registration would be eroded.

  11. Tim is n WI

    ACSOL,
    I thought I’d post this story here.
    https://www.eff.org/press/releases/california-prisons-block-ai-researchers-examining-parole-denials

    Somebody who doesn’t want to play ball, aye! Hmm I wonder why not.

Leave a Reply

We welcome a lively discussion with all view points - keeping in mind...  
  • Your submission will be reviewed by one of our volunteer moderators. Moderating decisions may be subjective.
  • Please keep the tone of your comment civil and courteous. This is a public forum.
  • Please stay on topic - both in terms of the organization in general and this post in particular.
  • Please refrain from general political statements in (dis)favor of one of the major parties or their representatives.
  • Please take personal conversations off this forum.
  • We will not publish any comments advocating for violent or any illegal action.
  • We cannot connect participants privately - feel free to leave your contact info here. You may want to create a new / free, readily available email address.
  • Please refrain from copying and pasting repetitive and lengthy amounts of text.
  • Please do not post in all Caps.
  • If you wish to link to a serious and relevant media article, legitimate advocacy group or other pertinent web site / document, please provide the full link. No abbreviated / obfuscated links.
  • We suggest to compose lengthy comments in a desktop text editor and copy and paste them into the comment form
  • We will not publish any posts containing any names not mentioned in the original article.
  • Please choose a user name that does not contain links to other web sites
  • Please send any input regarding moderation or other website issues to moderator [at] all4consolaws [dot] org
ACSOL, including but not limited to its board members and agents, does not provide legal advice on this website.  In addition, ACSOL warns that those who provide comments on this website may or may not be legal professionals on whose advice one can reasonably rely.  
 

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

.