California RSOL Lobbying in Sacramento

California RSOL will lobby newly elected members of the state Assembly in Sacramento on January 29 and 30. Thirty-nine new members were sworn in earlier this month. There are a total of 80 members in that legislative body.

“It is important to meet with the newly elected state legislators this month in order to educate them regarding the true facts regarding registrants,” stated Janice Bellucci, President of California RSOL. “In the past, state legislators have passed laws based upon fear and misinformation that have diminished public safety and denied registrants their civil rights.”

An important objective of California RSOL this year is passage of a tiered registry bill that would allow some registrants to leave the registry after 10 or 20 years. California is 1 of only 4 states that has a lifetime registry for all registrants regardless of the severity of the offense or the current risk of the individual.

“In a time of declining state resources, it is important that resources be used efficiently to monitor only those who pose a current danger to public safety,” stated Bellucci. The California registry includes individuals convicted of non-contact offenses such as public urination and sexting a loved one as well as consensual teen sex up to 50 years ago. According to a recent psychological study, anyone on the registry who has not re-offended in 20 years has the same probability to commit a sex offense as anyone not on the registry.

A tiered registry has not yet been introduced, however, one is expected to be introduced in the Assembly no later than March 2013.

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@fish in a net … You’re right. I just read AB 321 … That sure isn’t meant to give anyone a warm feeling, does it? So, is essence …. The registrant registers and then it would seem that the police need to come by and “see” where you live. Wow.