ACSOL’s Conference Calls

Conference Call Recordings Online
Dial-in number: 1-712-770-8055, Conference Code: 983459

Monthly Meetings: Nov 21, Dec 19 – Details / Recordings

Emotional Support Group Meetings 2020 (Phone only)

California

Bill Sets Discipline for Students Who Engage in Sexting

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A state lawmaker is carrying a bill that would let schools suspend or expel kids for sexting — sharing sexually explicit material via text message.

Democratic Assemblyman Ed Chau of Arcadia says Assembly Bill 2536 would also require that health classes include information on the perils of sharing scandalous content.

The Sacramento Bee reports Saturday (http://bit.ly/1Qkn7Ai) the bill specifically deals with images or video and focuses on cases where the message has “the effect of humiliating or harassing a pupil.” Full Article

Related

Sext Away, Teens of New Mexico!

Prosecutor warns teens that sexual selfies can carry legal consequences (TX)

 

Join the discussion

  1. Agamemnon

    I agree with the provision of including sexting awareness in health classes, but expelling students for trite decisions as part of an ongoing relationship, that seems a bit excessive.

    Now if the sexting in question was unwelcome, harassment, or coerced under duress, then yes, punitive measures should be taken. But if two people in a committed relationship are sharing private, intimate moments with one another, then these punishments are excessive, especially since they will haunt said students on their perminent records.

    • Q

      I agree with none of this. The state or schools should not be involved in any of this. It’s the parents responsibility.

      • Q

        And besides; the state, as well as schools have more than proven themselves to be poor arbiters of anyone’s conduct; especially their sex conduct. This is the parents responsibility, and as far as judging what is right and what is wrong for these kids, well, that should be between the kid and God. Kids have been around for a long time and have turned out OK so far, and nowhere in history has this sex hysteria happened to the degree and depths that our so called responsible officials have taken and allowed this to go.

  2. MichaelRS

    I know the saying goes if you can’t legislate common sense, but how about a bill that tries to offer a little guidance in the area where these kids aren’t busted for distributing “child porn” or that sort of thing that they have to register as sex offenders for the rest of their life.

  3. ab

    We live in a country where certain health/sexual health information is treated as being more relevant to one gender over another in educational settings. Abstinence only programs are taught and many states don’t require medically accurate information be presented in middle school/junior high and high school. Before putting forward any additional discussion topics for health class and sex education how about making sure what’s currently taught is accurate and effective.

    Sexting should absolutely be covered, but there are already plenty of gaps needing to be closed before figuring out how to address sexting. Also its laughable that automatically a sext in the mind of the above California state lawmaker is considered scandalous content. What constitutes sexually explicit material under the law might surprise people, especially teens sexting and framing sexting as negative all the time sends potentially dangerous messages about sexuality to those who don’t need anymore confusion.

  4. td777

    I agree classes should cover this information, but they shouldn’t be expelling students over it.

  5. sadandmad

    In New Mexico, minors can consent to send stuff in texts, but not to a relationship with some one older?

  6. David

    There’s no reason to expel the students if they are already jailed and awaiting trial on child pornography charges. Now, if we could just charge people for whatever prurient thoughts they think, EVERYONE would be registered! And THEN the laws would start getting changed!!

Leave a Reply

We welcome a lively discussion with all view points - keeping in mind...  
  • Your submission will be reviewed by one of our volunteer moderators. Moderating decisions may be subjective.
  • Please keep the tone of your comment civil and courteous. This is a public forum.
  • Please stay on topic - both in terms of the organization in general and this post in particular.
  • Please refrain from general political statements in (dis)favor of one of the major parties or their representatives.
  • Please take personal conversations off this forum.
  • We will not publish any comments advocating for violent or any illegal action.
  • We cannot connect participants privately - feel free to leave your contact info here. You may want to create a new / free, readily available email address.
  • Please refrain from copying and pasting repetitive and lengthy amounts of text.
  • Please do not post in all Caps.
  • If you wish to link to a serious and relevant media article, legitimate advocacy group or other pertinent web site / document, please provide the full link. No abbreviated / obfuscated links.
  • We suggest to compose lengthy comments in a desktop text editor and copy and paste them into the comment form
  • We will not publish any posts containing any names not mentioned in the original article.
  • Please choose a user name that does not contain links to other web sites
  • Please send any input regarding moderation or other website issues to moderator [at] all4consolaws [dot] org
ACSOL, including but not limited to its board members and agents, does not provide legal advice on this website.  In addition, ACSOL warns that those who provide comments on this website may or may not be legal professionals on whose advice one can reasonably rely.  
 

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

.