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PA: Superior Court upholds sex offender’s registration order

The state Superior Court upheld a Lackawanna County judge’s ruling that extends the time a convicted sex offender must report his whereabouts under Megan’s Law from 10 years to life. ..

The court acknowledged the reporting requirements are a burden for Mr. ____, but it likened them to requirements of a person who is on probation and must meet with a probation officer. It therefore found the requirement was not punitive. Full Article

Court Decision

Join the discussion

  1. WantsToHelp

    I’m confused. The court in this instance said the registration restrictions were no more punitive than being on probation, therefore they weren’t punishment. But isn’t probation punishment? How can something being no more restrictive than an actual punishment not be an actual punishment?

    • Frank

      Next we will hear that encarceration is not punishment. It’s something we just do for the
      hell of it.

      • Timmr

        It already is not called punishment. It is called indefinite detention and civil commitment.

    • 4sensiblepolicies

      This was my thought exactly. After the esteemed Pennsylvania Superior Court issued it’s decree, I became somewhat confused about the nature of probation. After all, we know registration has never been considered punishment by the courts. They have been so careful to avoid calling it punishment. We know that if registration were considered punishment, it would be an ex post facto violation if the term is extended or conditions altered for those convicted prior to the alteration.

      So the honorable PA court says that registration is like probation. Probation is defined as: A punishment given out as part of a sentence which means that instead of jailing a person convicted of a crime, a judge will order that the person reports to a probation officer regularly and according to a set schedule.

      Someone will have to make me understand how these highly intelligent jurists determined that extending the term of registration isn’t a punishment, because it is only like probation – a punishment.

      Note to the courts: It’s hard to be a good liar. You have got to be able to nail down your details and keep your ‘facts’ (I mean – lies) straight on a consistent basis.

  2. Paul

    While being a bad judgement, it is interesting that the court likened registration requirements to being similar to probation. How is that not a punishment, and not punitive?

    • Jason

      Note that they said “For these reasons, we conclude, at least as applied to appellant, the lifetime registration and quarterly, in-person reporting requirements at issue are not excessive in light of SORNA’s nonpunitive legislative purpose”

      According to the court, the exact same conditions are or are not punishment based on the “purpose” of the law. Probation is a punishment because that is what its purpose is. Registration isn’t because the legislature had a non-punishment purpose.

      Send your kid to a timeout in his room because he stole a cookie is a punishment. Send him to his room because his siblings are afraid he might rape them because he stole a cookie in the past isn’t a punishment.

      • Timmmy

        What I want to know is why don’t attorneys ever use the 13th Amendment as an argument? Making someone do something against their will without compensation, and not a punishment is slavery.

        Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

        Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

      • Anonymous

        By that rationalization, they could be requiring us to break our own fingers and then jail us for being non-compliant once we run out of fingers, because the purpose of SORNA is not punitive… Jesus Christ…

  3. PK

    As Janice mentioned, this whole Megan’s Law will need to be challenged at the Supreme Court.

  4. A

    OMFG!!!!!

  5. wonderin

    “Probation for ​criminals is the ​condition of being ​allowed ​freedom if they ​commit no more ​crimes and ​follow ​certain ​rules.”

    I can understand the mindset of the judges to liken the registry to probation.
    Sex offenders have been found guilty of a crime and sentenced accordingly.
    Some are incarcerated, some ordered to therapy and most are sentenced to a registry which has evolved into probation and progressive monitoring for 10 years to life.
    Forcing them to abide by the ever changing terms of their probation/registry requirements are thought to be effective controls over their innate behavior characteristics.

    Unfortunately, these judges seem to pass aside the logical rights of an individual to a fair hearing to explain why their extended probation/registration or controls is justified by law.

    I imagine anyone on any type of probation looks forward to being free of scrutiny and the intimidation that goes with it.

    • PK

      Leave the country- in order to be free of scrutiny and constant intimidation by law enforcement. What’s point of living like that?

  6. G4Change

    Another satisfied Price Club member! [sarcasm]
    Makes. Me. Sick.

  7. KangaroOCourt

    Appeal & lawsuit their (mule) financially. They are blatantly Wrong and they need to be the north korea example that treats people without dignity and fairness. In gross violation to our Constitution & human rights. Appeal this case. This needs to be in front of the ussupreme court. This is in your face you wannabe north korea..WRONG.

    • Brubaker

      You’re right kangarooJack.:) this case should be appealed and it will WIN. For all it will prove thank you lackawanna county that registering is extended punishment. We’ve all known it. It just took some time for you guys to admit it. Have a nice day.

    • Brubaker

      Exactly Kangaroo, probation/parole are conditions of punishment. Punishment within the limits of probation/parole.
      This is one of more opportunities for all to get off this registry with appeal & challenge extending punishment.

      • KangaroOCourt

        That so called ‘liberty bell’ just got a new crack in it from their own doing.
        They might as well refer to it as a shackle.
        But at least they did admit registry is punishment.
        Let the shackles ring. 😉

  8. New Person

    Going to prison is punishment. Probation can be given in lieu of a prison term. If the probationer violates a condition during the probation period, then either more restrictions are applied or serve a prison term – both are still forms of punishment. Once probation is successfully completed, then convict has “proven” their selves under probationary terms. Essentially, he or she as completed their prison sentence, so to speak.

    Registration is a felony if a registrant does not comply. A felony that can land one in prison – which is punishment. That is exactly like probation. Lifetime registration is lifetime probation. So registration is a form of punishment as it has consequences of conditions are not followed. A person is punished for not following the conditions of registration.

    A lifetime of punishment is simply cruel and inhumane.

    No other convicts share this type of punishment, which violates equal protection.

    Now that this court has intimated in court that registration is like probation. That is now legally in court. Which means it can now be used in future cases to identify the court has related registration with probation.

    • Tuna

      An excellent argument, imo, on the ex post facto issue(s). But surely this has been argued/litigated before in these or similar terms?

    • Frank

      Excellent “New Person”. Exactly the feeling I’ve had for 25 years now. Driving to work I’m continuously watching the mirrors for law enforcement. Nervous when the doorbell rings. Jump when the phone rings. Sick to the stomach weeks before the Price Club membership renewal is due. What about someone making false accusations. Very scary. Wondering what is the next new law that will be written that will kill more of my “God given rights”.

      If every felon was required to register…and the system became bogged down, then the constitution would receive enough scrutiny, (via lawsuits) to finally set us free. A map with a red dot hovering over the homes of every felon in the entire U.S., and I’ll bet the map would look like a case of the measles.

      • Lake County

        Frank: Exactly the feeling I’ve had for 25 years now. Driving to work I’m continuously watching the mirrors for law enforcement. Nervous when the doorbell rings. Jump when the phone rings. Sick to the stomach weeks before the Price Club membership renewal is due. What about someone making false accusations. Very scary. Wondering what is the next new law that will be written that will kill more of my “God given rights”

        You nailed how we feel in your above statement. The only thing that makes it easier is to just stay inside our house for what little safety or piece of mind that provides.

      • Timmr

        About one in twelve adults is a felon: http://paa2011.princeton.edu/papers/111687 .
        About one in four black adults is a felon. By the way, residency restrictions increase the number of felons in marginal areas, poor neighborhoods, industrial ares, etc., where disproportionate incarceration has congregated people of color. All those dots will be especially heavy in the “red lined” areas. The goal of residency restrictions is to keep the property values up in white, middle class neighborhoods. And you don’t need residency restriction to do this. The fact that registrants can’t find good jobs will push them into the marginal areas. Frankly, we are another facet of the ghetto-ization of America.

  9. Jo

    Guess they had to come up with their own lame analogy since Price Club was already taken

  10. JohnDoeUtah

    Here is the ruling:

    http://www.pacourts.us/assets/opinions/Superior/out/J-S05010-16o%20-%201025561266192467.pdf?cb=1

    “Indeed, as a practical matter, perfect precision is unrealistic. It may be the case that an individual sex offender, who appears most likely to reoffend, might never commit another offense even in the absence of any Megan’s Law regime. Similarly, an individual registrant, who appears least likely to reoffend, might reoffend despite the most onerous Megan’s Law sanctions. Simply put, it is impossible to predict future behavior with perfect accuracy; thus, no regime designed to prevent future behavior can be held to such exacting standards of rationality. It is enough that the statute will sometimes fulfill its non-punitive purpose to demonstrate the rationality of the measures imposed. As the Smith Court stated, “A statute is not deemed punitive simply because it lacks a close or perfect fit with the nonpunitive aims it seeks to advance.” Smith, 538 U.S. at 103.”

    Can you guys see this line from the judge being used to justify IML?

    • Frank

      “It may be the case that an individual sex offender, who appears most likely to re-offend,”
      JohnDoeUtah…. This quote says it all. If a SO does it once, they will most likely re-offend.

      And that is the mindset. This is where the public is paranoid and the new laws just keep on coming. And the offender must abide by every new law that gets spit out of the courts and the system.

      Its “double jeopardy” with each and every new law and new stipulation that changes the initial registration requirement set at the time of original conviction.

    • Timmr

      When there is imperfect knowledge, I think the Bill of Rights says we ought to err on the side of freedom. That is what I thought distinguished us from tyrannies. Now they err on the side of suppositions.

    • New Person


      It is enough that the statute will sometimes fulfill its non-punitive purpose to demonstrate the rationality of the measures imposed. As the Smith Court stated, “A statute is not deemed punitive simply because it lacks a close or perfect fit with the nonpunitive aims it seeks to advance.”

      With this rationale, then one can now see how Japanese Americans were placed in incarcerated camps during WW2. The US Government was proven to have been proven wrong in that case.

      • Timmr

        Hah, I get it, as long as there was one Japanese American that was stopped doing something harmful by being detained, then the detention of all the others was justified. But what about any evidence that even one Japanese American was a spy. It is all speculation. Just like the speculation that the registry saves one child somewhere? Were is the proof?
        Imagine if they regulated products like this. Whole businesses would be shut down to prevent a drop of oil from going into a stream. Pills would be banned because someone might choke on one. When a new drug goes on the market it is tested (usually) rigorously with verifiable observations. There may be some concern that the test was not done correctly, but no one disagrees that the tests need to be thorough and verifiable. It is necessary for the safety of the public and to make sure no one is burdened arbitrarily.
        Not so when it comes to registrants, which by the way, Chief Justice are people, endowed by the Creator, etc., etc, remember? Do they have rights, or are they objects? Subjects of the courts or legislature to do with as they please? If we are to be regulated like dangerous commodities, then the same standards of empirical oversight need to be employed, not just the governments word that its intent was good. That is lame and and especially negligent when applied to living, breathing, feeling, thinking human beings.

        • 4sensiblePolicies

          The court will always fall back on the terms ‘legislative intent’ in upholding a bad law. That is, they’ll just go along with it because the “intent” is to stop sex trafficking. However, what you are saying makes a great deal of sense to me. How can any court just go on blindly granting deference to the ‘intent’ of the legislature when it runs roughshod over civil rights and when there is no evidence that the intent is rooted in any basis of fact.

          If the courts continue to grant deference to legislative intent, then is there anything out of bounds to the legislature? Apparently the fact of a prior ‘conviction’ gives them the perceived right to enact any law they can dream up.

          Taking their logic to its ultimate extent, wouldn’t it be considered Constitutional to permanently track a car with GPS of everyone ever convicted of a DUII? The intent would be to detect erratic driving and reduce drunk driving crashes. Could persons convicted of drug offenses be subject to random inspections of their property or person for the rest of their lives? After all, it could save a child from being supplied drugs by that person who has shown him or herself to have a potential to harm.

          The question becomes, are we rapidly moving into a society where your civil rights are celebrated and protected – until you cross a line. Cross that line (a criminal conviction) and from that point on you are merely a commodity for the political system to do what they will with you. No redemption. From that day on, you are finished. We’re basically already there for RC’s – but does America have any idea how these bad judicial decisions are laying the ground work for the demise of anyone who runs afoul of the ‘law’ for any reason?

  11. Eric Knight

    When the judgment of the Supreme Court states that punishment = non-punishment, this bodes evil for the future of jurisprudence for every citizen

    • Timmr

      “War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength.” -1984 (George Orwell)

  12. someone who cares

    Probation is definitely a form of punishment and it is stated on many law websites. Registration is also a form of punishment, especially since it takes away some of the freedom that others enjoy, long after a sentence has been completed. I agree with New Person that registration violates the equal rights protection. If registration is meant for protecting the public, then other offenders would also have to register to protect the public. They can’t pick and choose which offenses harmed the public. Drunk Driving, selling drugs, robberies, burglaries, assault, etc also harm the public. Either all of these ex-offenders need to be treated the same, or none. That is equal rights protection….

  13. Renny

    In one way I agree with the judge. I had significantly more freedom and civil liberties when I was on probation than I do under the current array of post-punishment punishments.

    Americans can call their silly little rules and terms whatever they want, but for me:

    Registration = Punishment
    Home Verification Raids = Harassment
    Residency Restrictions = Banishment
    Exclusion Zones = Exile
    Sex Offender = Former Citizen Detainees

    These are the terms, or ones similar to them, that need to be used and made commonplace. When an American mommy hears “Child Safety Zone” she feels warm and fuzzy and “knows” that no one but her will molest her kids.

    But when they hear the term banishment, exile and hear that sex offenders are no longer considered American citizens, but yet they are trapped inside the borders(following the IML) they will lose that warm fuzzy feeling and then maybe some broad national changes will occur, because then the reality of terms must be dealt with.

    We are here America. You will not let us leave. We are angry with you. We have the courts and we are honoring our former citizen status to use the courts to try to improve our lives. But since 1994 there has been one step forward, ten steps back. Eventually most of us will lose faith in the courts, the system and our fellow man.

    If you want to see what happens when a group of people feels outcast, unheard, hated and shunned, look no further than the Shia in Iraq. While Saddam squashed their revolts, it was the feeling of exclusion from government, society and a disproportionate alottment of civil liberties and unequal punitive measures for crime that created the feeling that there was little left to lose. While Former Citizen Detainees lack the religious fervor and bonding that was the fuse lighting the fire, most of us alive and adults in 1980 have witnessed and can feel the sectarianism and if we look at past legislation as a line graph, the blank end of that line graph looks pretty hopeless.

    We are not there yet, but I think now that we are legislative prisoners in a nation that does not want us, we’re pretty close.

    • James

      Geeze, that was good stuff, Renny…I copy and pasted your writing…I am sure I will use it somewhere. It is the tortured use and abuse of language that needs to be noted…these terms have been so twisted from their common sense meaning that we are in Alice in Wonderland territory.

      Thanks

      Best Wishes, James

  14. Tom

    In Florida, A appeals court judge in a case stated that probation is a form of punishment and is cited even referring to the Florida criminal – probation section. (I can’t remember it now because this was a few years ago when I was gathering and compiling many defenses to get out of probation early, which I was triumphant. Thank goodness. Even though probation is indeed an alternative to incarceration, it is a form of punishment(Those were the judges words ). Court judges have to be careful in the wordings they use in a case because it can backfire on them in another court and can be an opportunity for a defendant, which I take advantage when my attorney and I look for weaknesses to my advantage. This judge in this case mentions the word ” burden “…that the requirement is burdensome for the defendant. If you look up ” burden ” it is synonymous with punishment.(3rd column)
    http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/burden

  15. anonymously

    Renny wrote “…Sex Offender = Former Citizen Detainees”

    I feel uncomfortable using that term since it implies concentration camps are coming soon. But with the latest proposal working it’s way through, IML, the term takes on new accuracy, and that bothers me. I think I saw it on Walsh’s America’s Most Wanted that the first thing to do when taken hostage is to access your escape routes. As a ( i would assume ) former offender, Walsh acts like he knows his stuff. And it makes sense when someone closes off your escape route, they are doing it for a sinister reason. I used to watch Walsh’s America’s Most Wanted which did these scene recreations of the crimes where the perps were on the run. It always showed the worst of the worst and Walsh would chime in calling them scumbags, dirtbags, etc. So it looked like Walsh was only concerned with the worst of the worst. Not so, as Walshs hypocritical laws targeted even the lowest level registrant with nasty repurcussions if Walsh’s and Foley’s arbitrary restrictions or in-person appearances or reportings or whatever are not followed.

    “If you want to see what happens when a group of people feels outcast, unheard, hated and shunned, look no further than the Shia in Iraq. While Saddam squashed their revolts, it was the feeling of exclusion from government, society and a disproportionate alottment of civil liberties and unequal punitive measures for crime that created the feeling that there was little left to lose.”

    Throughout history, they have had a lot to lose, however. Shia were always the majority in Iraq. Even back when Iraq was Mesopotamia, Shia’s were in charge. There was a Shia caliphate. Of course, during the Ottomon Empire, Sunni’s were in charge. Shia’s got burned by Bush Sr. leaving them in the dust after the Gulf War as he had promised to back the Shia’s after the war. They felt let down obviously. But they did have their non-arab Iranian Shia’s next door to offer some support. The Iranian Shia’s took in some of their religious Iraqi Arab Shia brothers. So it’s not like they had no friends at all or throughout history. I would liken registrants in the US moreso to the Yezidi people who, in the Middle East, do not have much help, do not have the numbers like the Shia do, and just want to be left alone. If the Shia were relatively few and powerless, then ISIS would not have gotten started since forming ISIS was a Iraqi Sunni response to Iraqi Shia dominance.

    “While Former Citizen Detainees lack the religious fervor and bonding that was the fuse lighting the fire, most of us alive and adults in 1980 have witnessed and can feel the sectarianism and if we look at past legislation as a line graph, the blank end of that line graph looks pretty hopeless.”

    There was a lot of sectarianism in Lebanon during that time. Hell broke loose in Lebanon in the late 70’s. But in 1980, there also was a lot of dictators keeping the secatarianism under wraps. The US foolishly got rid of these guys and FaceBook played a role enabling the Arab Spring where FaceBook got to expand its business by providing a platform to take down the dictators, which led to the formation of ISIS. FaceBook will not let ex-sex offenders speak on their forums, but they let ISIS form on their forums. That sounds idiotic. Hafez Assad, Saddam, Kadaffi, and Boumediene of Algeria to name a few that got taken down. Egypt is different with not much divide among Muslims since Egypt is all Sunni Muslim and Christians, no Shia there. Through greed, war profiteers justified war to enrich themselves at the expense of peace in the world. Attack and rid the world of these dictators at the expense of the people who have to deal with ISIS now. Same thing with these bogus sex offender laws. These laws get created and snowball down the slippery slope of lost civil rights, lost humanity, and creating false senses of security so non-registrant sex crimes like that of John Walsh and Mark Foley can flourish without intervention.

    “We are not there yet, but I think now that we are legislative prisoners in a nation that does not want us, we’re pretty close.

    And now with Trump talking about building a wall on the Arizona-Mexico and the Texas-Mexico border,( California-Mexico already has a wall built with a few crossings like Otay-Mesa) escaping concentration camp type persecutions seems to be vastly more difficult if it ever came to that, and in Walshs line of thinking, it will come to that.

  16. anonymously

    Renny wrote “…Sex Offender = Former Citizen Detainees”

    I feel uncomfortable using that term since it implies concentration camps are coming soon. But with the latest proposal working it’s way through, IML, the term takes on new accuracy, and that bothers me. I think I saw it on Walsh’s America’s Most Wanted that the first thing to do when taken hostage is to assess your escape routes. As a ( i would assume ) former offender, Walsh acts like he knows his stuff. And it makes sense when someone closes off your escape route, they are doing it for a sinister reason. I used to watch Walsh’s America’s Most Wanted which did these scene recreations of the crimes where the perps were on the run. It always showed the worst of the worst and Walsh would chime in calling them scumbags, dirtbags, etc. So it looked like Walsh was only concerned with the worst of the worst. Not so, as Walshs hypocritical laws targeted even the lowest level registrant with nasty repurcussions if Walsh’s and Foley’s arbitrary restrictions are not followed.

    “If you want to see what happens when a group of people feels outcast, unheard, hated and shunned, look no further than the Shia in Iraq. While Saddam squashed their revolts, it was the feeling of exclusion from government, society and a disproportionate alottment of civil liberties and unequal punitive measures for crime that created the feeling that there was little left to lose.”

    Throughout history, they have had a lot to lose, however. Shia were always the majority in Iraq. Even back when Iraq was Mesopotamia, Shia’s were in charge. There was a Shia caliphate. Of course, during the Ottomon Empire, Sunni’s were in charge. Shia’s got burned by Bush Sr. leaving them in the dust after the Gulf War as he had promised to back the Shia’s after the war. They felt let down obviously. But they did have their non-arab Iranian Shia’s next door to offer some support. The Iranian Shia’s took in some of their religious Iraqi Arab Shia brothers. So it’s not like they had no friends at all or throughout history. And is Bush Sr, toppled Saddam , ISIS would have formed that much sooner. It was his dipshit son W. who ousted Saddam and in 2003 whose people supported Smith v Doe. I would liken registrants in the US moreso to the Yezidi people who, in the Middle East, do not have much help, do not have the numbers like the Shia do, and just want to be left alone. If the Shia were relatively few and powerless, then ISIS would not have gotten started since forming ISIS was a Iraqi Sunni response to Iraqi Shia dominance. And of course, not without the help of FaceBook, who gave us the Arab Spring which catalyzed the formation of ISIS and who gave us Chris Kelly and enabled him through enriching him to Donald Trump levels through immoral corporate inversion practices of FaceBook, who like ISIS’ perverted version of Islam, brought us and has attempted to bring perverted laws which contradict the US Constitution’s 1st Amendment. With Kelly claiming false emergencies that really do not exist in regards to registrants, this is in spirit tantamount to yelling ‘Fire’ in a crowded theatre. Chris Smith has also used this tactic of yelling Fire, and by claiming a false emergency and invoking sex trafficking, it is hard to believe Kelly is not involved to fund this as well.

    “While Former Citizen Detainees lack the religious fervor and bonding that was the fuse lighting the fire, most of us alive and adults in 1980 have witnessed and can feel the sectarianism and if we look at past legislation as a line graph, the blank end of that line graph looks pretty hopeless.”

    There was a lot of sectarianism in Lebanon during that time. Hell broke loose in Lebanon in the late 70’s. But in 1980, there also was a lot of dictators keeping the sectarianism under wraps. The US foolishly got rid of these guys and FaceBook played a role enabling the Arab Spring where FaceBook got to expand its business by providing a platform to take down the dictators, which led to the formation of ISIS. And FaceBook reaped the profits from this while only paying 2% international taxes on this. FaceBook will not let ex-sex offenders speak on their forums, but they let ISIS form on their forums. Idiotic. Hafez Assad, Saddam, Kadaffi, and Boumediene of Algeria to name a few that got taken down. Egypt is different with not much divide among Muslims since Egypt is all Sunni Muslim and Christians, no Shia there. Through greed, war profiteers justified war to enrich themselves at the expense of peace in the world. Attack and rid the world of these dictators at the expense of the people who have to deal with ISIS now. Same thing with these bogus sex offender laws. These laws get created and snowball down the slippery slope of lost civil rights, lost humanity, and creating false senses of security so non-registrant sex crimes like that of John Walsh and Mark Foley can flourish without intervention. Not to mention creating a police state where normal behavior is criminalized, where any group could be next.

    “We are not there yet, but I think now that we are legislative prisoners in a nation that does not want us, we’re pretty close.

    And now with Trump talking about building a wall on the Arizona-Mexico and the Texas-Mexico border,( California-Mexico already has a wall built with a few crossings like Otay-Mesa) escaping concentration camp type persecutions seems to be becoming vastly more difficult if it ever came to that, and in Walshs line of thinking, it will come to that.

    • David Kennerly

      “Citizen Detainees” is hardly hyperbolic or inaccurate. We are, very much, “detainees” given both IML which detains us within the U.S., residency laws which restrict our residencies and our movements, as well as laws on civil commitment, in which citizens are being held involuntarily in what are clearly prisons (and, quite literally, “concentration camps”), beyond their prison sentences to say nothing of those who now find themselves on lifetime parole.

      Sadly, it is no exaggeration at all to refer to us as “Detainees”. Our rights are dramatically degraded and our movement strictly limited.

      • Timmr

        True, detainee is far more descriptive of the situation we live in than the more limited term registrant.
        “Detainee:
        a person held in custody especially for political reasons
        Custody:
        immediate charge and control (as over a ward or a suspect) exercised by a person or an authority
        Ward:
        a person or thing under guard, protection, or surveillance”
        —Merriam Webster Dictionary

        It is stated in the laws that the reason we are on the registry is to protect the public. It is also assumed by this that we are likely to commit a crime. Otherwise, there is no logical reason to provide and keep updated a list of our present information. Therefore we are suspects. The duty for us to keep our information updated is coerced and backed up by threats of internment in a lock up facility if we don’t comply. Not only that, but officers of the law arrive on many of our doorsteps with no other reason than it is assumed we will not comply. It is illegal, for example for an officer to detain (stop)a person, for however how long, simply because they are on a list, such as a drivers license list, simply to check that the information is current. We are allowed an exception to the rule. This is another sign we are still under custody.

        • American Detained in America

          That is so true…I’ve changed my name here thanks to your inspiration.

          And you’re right, there is no logical reason, but then there never has been. It’s never been about logic, it’s about political power and money, nothing more.

  17. Pam Purvis

    I don’t understand how court after court, can find the extension of a punishment once issued for a period of 10 or 15 years then changed to a life sentence, just. No defendant’s initial cases were reviewed; they were all changed to life sentences. Even for some who had completed their terms. Then names are published on a website, and the whole family is on that list. I have applied for more than a dozen jobs that I am more than qualified for, but I don’t get even a call back after the background check has been done.
    If someone has served their time, and they are proven beyond any doubt not a danger to society in any way, why are they still remanded to a lifetime of punishment when it was not even the sentence in the first place? And how can they afford to hire a lawyer to fight for them when they are unemployable due to the registration list? And not eligible for assistance/disability because they are deemed able to work?

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