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Metro officer who pleaded guilty to child porn presumably commits suicide

[KVVU-TV Las Vegas]

A Metro police officer who pleaded guilty to child pornography charges earlier this year has died at the age of 25, one day before he was supposed to answer for his crimes.

Investigators said Officer Ruben Delgadillo was using software to share one of the largest stashes of child pornography in Nevada. He was 24 years old when he was arrested last Aug. and faced the up to 45 years in prison. Officers said Delgadillo told them he knew he had a problem and felt guilty comparing himself to sex offenders arrested in child molestation cases.

Delgadillo was found dead in his bedroom on July 24, the day before his sentencing. Law enforcement sources close to FOX5 said he committed suicide by asphyxiation. The Clark County Coroner’s Office said it is still running tests.

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  1. Gralphr

    This man knew his life as he knew it was over. He may have been able to live with himself if he had “just” killed a man, but to be caught with child porn, he knew he would be looked at as if he were Jeffery Dahmer himself. The man even compared himself to someone who physically molested a child, which in itself is wrong if he did no such thing. The whole concept of having illegal pictures is like having actually harmed said individual is like saying I personally killed someone in Iraq if I were to watch military footage. Regardless, the man was wrong, but its sad to see that he felt death was his only option.

  2. Counting the days

    Another life ended through being shamed. I am sure child pornography has the highest rate of suicide of any crime. Suicide is directly related to the feeling of life lost and hopelessness. Most, not all, convicted of this have undisclosed abuse issues in their childhood. I know, because I have been thrown into this pit of shame and despair.

    • C

      +1

      It is a shame on several levels. The shame he faces is compounded by his association w/ LE and relationships he built while a police officer, especially if he comes from a family in LE. The label of child molester/pornographer/sex offender/ex-cop when in prison was the icing on this s*** cake.

  3. AlexO

    “I remember seeing his face on TV. Wow. That’s crazy,” he said. “I wish people would reach out for help and be strong. That’s being strong, reaching out for help … I just feel bad for his family left behind now having to deal with this.”

    Funny you said that, officer. I don’t know how things are in Nevada, but here in California two years ago they made disclosure of viewing CSAI (Child Sex Abuse Images) mandatory reporting. So you can’t actually seek help without lying about it. That is if you can bring yourself to admit you even have a problem. America should look to Germany and how they handle such things.

    • AJ

      Something that was long ago learned in hospitals, and found to be present in pretty much any situation, is that if someone fears reprisal for speaking up, they won’t. In hospitals, it was nurses not admitting to mistakes in dosing patients, sometimes harming or killing them, for fear of being fired. In the oil industry, it was failing to report safety issues and violations, for fear of being fired. In the airline industry, same thing. The concept of a Positive Safety Culture (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safety_culture) is sloooowwlly being embraced in our country in high-risk, high-consequence fields. (There is always a Safety Culture, albeit perhaps a horrible one!) This same concept would certainly apply to law enforcement and LEOs: risk for this officer to admit this mistake? Firing (at minimum).

    • Faithlessoptimisim

      GERMANY definatly has the right approach to crime in general. We actually ship our Justice guys there to learn. I only with they brought back more. So sad to see more lives lost out of shame.

  4. Eric

    45 years for looking at photos that are available to every home with an internet connection. A gang member could shoot into a birthday party for a drug deal retaliation and not get close to that much time. I find it astonishing that the government can hack in and disable a nuclear reactor protected with an air wall, but yet these CP sites remain at the same address for years without disruption. Why is there not a single bit of consumer protection for this stuff? Every thing in the US from toys to candy to appliances has consumer protection, but not the internet. Porn is well known to be addicting. Most of these men are good citizens, good fathers, good employees, but get caught up in the vicious porn cycle and then their life is destroyed by an ignorant, heartless, justice system. RIP young man.

    • AlexO

      The article actually said he was sharing the photos and had one of the largest caches every found in Nevada.

      The reason why police have a hard time taking these down is that most of them live on the Dark Net. If you’re not familiar with it, it’s basically the internet that cannot be accessed in a normal manner and non of its content directly shows up on Google or other search engines. About 90% of the entire internet exists in this manner. So the infinite internet that Google shows us is only the tip of the iceberg.

      The thing that make it even more difficult is that the way this Dark Net exists. Every site you visit actually takes you through many relays, masking where the visitor is coming from and where the actual website lives in terms of the actual server that hosting it. With a regular website (like this one) you can fairly easily find out where it lives in a regular world. On the Dark Net it’s nearly impossible. And if you can’t figure that out, you can’t shut it down.

      The Dark Net and the special TOR browsers for accessing it was created more for anonymous browsing to help people remain safe from people spying on you and gather your information. But it also created a perfect breading ground for all sorts of highly illegal activity such as child pornography and the infamous Silk Road website where you could literally buy anything, including an assassin for hire. The reason why the Silk Road was found and shut down was that it’s creator made a mistake on the regular internet and they were able to use his regular emails to track it all down. Otherwise, tracking down a website on the Dark Net is about as easy as finding a particular grain of sand on the beach.

      • Lovecraft

        While im sure there is a ton of cp on the dark net, Im sure there is plenty of it still readily available without using the dark net like newsgroups, peer to peer xfers like limewire, emule etc, along with some still being available over the main search engines. Besides, the government doesnt want cp to go away. It is their best tool they have to weed out people who they think are damaged beyond repair and it provides them with a nice pool of people for their social experiment called the registry.

        Another thing is that sharing can have a multitude of different meanings, which none of them are matter to the general public. Most people dont have the time or need to understand the nuances of cp distribution, but us as a group know better. For example, i check the arrest record in my county everday and have for the past 15 months or so. During that time there has been one person charged with possession of cp and around 68 charged with distribution. The point im trying to make is just about everyone who gets caught with cp gets a distribution charge, but i seriously doubt all those people were guilty of “true” distribution. The state doesnt have to prove intent (sexual or knowingly sharing images). That in itself has become a huge problem. You cannot discern between users and distributors anymore. There is an interesting case the 9th circuit is considering out of Arizona (May vs Ryan) you can find the pdf here

        https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/granule/USCOURTS-azd-2_14-cv-00409/USCOURTS-azd-2_14-cv-00409-1/content-detail.html

        In this case there is an oppurtunity to challenge strict liability. There needs to be a precedent set to make the state prove criminal intent. In my case i got charged with distribution(state charges), but i didnt have a giant “cache” nor did I even know I was sharing the files (which i stated from day 1) and it certainly wasnt on the dark web. In some states there is a huge difference in possession versus distribution and it can increase the amount of time registered by 15 years or more.

        Lastly, I wanted to add that in november of 2016 the feds updated their federal sentencing guildlines for cp. Now in order to prove intent to distribute 2 factors have to be present. First an actual agreement between 1 party and a second party must have occurred. Secondly, the exchange must have actually occurred. So what this means is peer to peer networks that auto share files without ones knowledge can no longer be used for distribution convictions at the federal level. The guildelines are under sections 2g2.1,2g2.2, and 2g3.1 as clarifying admendments, which makes them automatically retroactive. I am hoping that between the federal updates and the may v ryan case these guidelines for cp distribution as well as other crimes like solicitation online will trickle down to state level and make the state prove intent. I feel for the guy in this article I dont know what his situation was, but being in LE combined with the charges he got must have been awful.

    • AJ

      @Eric:
      Well said. My hope is that perhaps there is an awakening in NV, both in the citizenry and the public agencies, about these issues. May his death and his family’s loss be a wake-up call.

  5. Harry

    1. Delgadillo likely got the software or information about the software from LE sources.
    2. This is sad to say, however, he did the right thing.
    3. If, there was pre-treatment vehicles in place to help those whom are caught up in sex offenses it would be the best for victims and the registry would be non-existing.

    • Al

      2. This is sad to say, however, he did the right thing.

      By killing himself? If this is what you mean, may I suggest that YOU jump off a bridge???

      • Harry

        Now, now AJ, why are you so unqualified personal here? What would you do if you were in this cop’s shoes, after arresting offenders doing the same thing he was doing? The shame is on you, AJ.

        • AJ

          @Harry:
          Time to go to the optometrist. 🙂 That posting was not by me, but by “AI.” Besides, such a posting is well outside my way of living. No shame here, sir!

  6. Counting the days

    I honestly feel he is better off, as is his family. Why go through the daily suffering for the rest of your life. His family would suffer, too. Just read all the articles of society abandoning us for the most minor of offenses because of a label. The talk that goes on behind your back. The betrayal by so called friends that will toss you aside rather than stand up for you. We are pack animals, and like any other pack species, without a pack to call home, we die. So he is at peace and his family can bury him. He will be buried an innocent man.

    • Registry Rage

      The only saving grace is, he was saved from being shunned and marginalized as a result of having to register for life in Florida once he DID get out of prison.

      I’m fairly certain that was one of the leading factors that solidified his final option.

      And you’re right… trust is destroyed forever. People may forgive you – over time, but they will never.. EVER.. forget, much less TRUST you again. They will always act weird and antsy in your presences.

  7. What did he take with him?

    I just wonder how much of this he actually got from the “evidence locker” or from other LE sources, not the software, but the actual material. Call this conspiracy but did he take with him secrets of the LVPD, et al on this type of stuff to protect others? Heard of worse things.

  8. kind of living

    this is sad on many levels , more than I have energy for after reading this , what it comes down to is that he was just a person with faults , its to bad that prison / shaming of this person is the only answer to handling the problem , only to create a cycle that’s not going to end even with his death , the cycle will continue , the only thing that changes is that he is dead leaving a family behind full of sadness , I understand why he killed him self , at one time years ago I felt like doing the same thing to save my wife and children the same shame I felt by dragging my baggage , but with coping skills as well as faith , I began to think it would be soon that the registry would be gone , and if not so be it , my family loves me just like they did years ago , and I am glad to still be kickin , but I feel it every time I here of someone killing them selfs because of the prisons and shaming , unable to see a way out , all the guilt/ sin/ blame , its to bad that many die like this are unable to see that the guilt/ sin/ blame will not be judged by other sinners , at least not with the authority to do so , taking simple responsibility is all that’s needed to be “spiritual” this man that died owes me nothing and harmed me in know way , so its easy to wish him good luck in his travel

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