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California

Experts: Reducing Prison Populations Best Way To Keep Sex Offenders Safe Behind Bars

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – California’s extraordinary rate of prison homicides is rekindling a debate over whether the state needs to further reduce its prison population to ensure inmates’ safety. Experts say trimming the inmate population is also the best hope for protecting sex offenders. Full Article

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  1. ab

    Uh how about locking less people up for sex offenses? Less offenders = victims. Oh wait I forgot there are basically no good preemptive non-law enforcement based programs to identify possible sexual issues years before they pop up and divert individuals towards healthy relationships and other vital skills for leading a balanced life.

    • Timmr

      The reason is, they wouldn’t work under our present system. If you “called out” for help, you would risk having children taken away and a life of economic hardship and public shaming. This affects the offender and all who have social ties with him. Many regret that they came out, and those that hide feel they are making the best faustian bargain. I am not defending hiding abusive behavior, but under this legal regime, it is understandable why people wish to deal with it (or rather ignore it and self medicate) without getting law enforcement involved.

      • ab

        I am taking about before a “call out”. Preventing offenses shouldn’t begin in adulthood but rather childhood. Enough research should be available to have a decent idea of what things in early life can lead someone towards potentially breaking a law 10, 20, 30 years later. In other words deal with sexual issues prior to them becoming sexual issues that need to be dealt with. Same goes for violence or misconduct in general. No one wants to admit the existence of underlying socio-economic/religious/legal policies that while appearing to do short term good actually foster long term trouble.

        • Harry

          I believe all first time sex offenders should be processed through the mental health arm, either as an outpatient or, if need be, in a MH institution. If, the person refuses to or is unable mitigate his/her behavior then they would be candidate for criminal system. These, harsh-first-drop-of-pen, laws not only it is expensive, it is actually harmful to victims. I think it would be harder for a kid that is being abuse by a loved one to report it, if he/she understands the destruction of sex offender laws.

  2. michael

    It seems to me that if 15% of the prison population is in there for a sex offense, that that is a substantial enough number to justify them having there own facility or at least there own wings or cell bloc or whatever at a couple different facilities.

    Since most are non-violent (to other prisoners and staff) staffing requirements would be minimal and would that and the cost of running such a facility , or part of one, would be offset by all the money the state would save from wrongful death lawsuits.

  3. Anonymous Nobody

    Let me get this straight, they’re saying that if we would only let more murderers out of prison, then sex offenders could be kept in prison without being murdered? Because of course, we wouldn’t want to let a sex offenders out, because they would be a danger to society, but a murderer is OK.

    After all, if you don’t let the people who are murdering sex offenders out of prison, then sex offenders will continue to be murdered. That is, they are advocating letting the murderers out rather than letting out sex offenders.

    Is this supposed to be some kind of LIBERAL idea to reduce the prison population — use sex offenders as the scapegoat again?

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