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Duggar scandal: What should parents do if a child touches a sibling?

The scandal surrounding the Duggar family, famous for their reality TV series “19 Kids and Counting,” and who confirmed this week that one of their sons inappropriately touched girls, at least two of them his sisters, when he was a teenager, raises a difficult question: What should parents do if one of their children is inappropriately touching a young sibling?

Dr. Karen Kay Imagawa, director of the Audrey Hepburn CARES Center at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, which offers services for suspected victims of child abuse and their families, offered some insights to the Los Angeles Times. Her advice and explanations are not specific to the Duggar case. Full Article

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  1. td777

    The parents were wise to handle it the way they did. The media should be ashamed of how they’ve handled it. They have again made victims of these girls, who love and forgave their brother. The media only did this to try to cause trouble on the family because they are Christians and did so without regard to what it would do to the girls involved.

  2. Kevin

    Knowing what I know now about the criminal justice system and registration, I wouldn’t never ever report an inappropriate touching episode to a healthcare professional or law enforcement. With mandatory reporting, any attempt to get help for either of your childen will result in a lifetime of torture for both the victim and the perpetrator. I often wonder how many parents end up regretting seeking professional help for their children every year. It is truly a shame that a parent can no longer help their child when they need it.

  3. Q

    What should parents do if a child touches a sibling? That’s an easy one!!!!

    1. Do not under any circumstances do what this lame ass article says to do. You are going to ruin your child’s life if you do.

    2. Do whatever it takes to get your head out of your a_s and be a parent. Don’t expect the state to be a parent for you. If you do, your asking for trouble for you and your kid. They’ll (the state) destroy the child’s life.

    3. Realize that this is something kids do; they touch and experiment. Many times they don’t know what is socially acceptable, and it’s your job as a parent to educate them, it’s not the states job. They can’t even educate themselves on the issues addressed on this site; so don’t think they have any kind of good solutions, because they don’t.

    4. Never forget that most of what you read in the lame stream media is subtle deception by people that are presstitutes and probably wouldn’t recognize truth if it fell out of the sky and landed on their head!

  4. Harry

    The harsh on sex offender legal system causes more harm to the victims, in most cases, than the original perpetuation.

    • Timmr

      You are right, Harry, in my experience families have a great ability to heal past wounds and the criminal justice system is there to prevent that. When you call the State in, even the family member who dutifully reported the incident, is treated like a criminal. They call her an enabler, and gives her a choice of being Informant or Co-conspirator. Criminal or Victim or Enabler, the process is to peg people in one of these pseudo-scientific categories. The whole family becomes the accused.
      Families know that life is more complicated than that. Indeed, the system is simply motivated to look for blame, and to enact punishment, to break up the family that won’t submit to its methods of mind control.

  5. lonovati

    If a Democrat had been caught doing this then Fox news and the neo-conservative right would be all over it and the liberals would be defending them, saying that “children are different than adults” and etc.

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