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Three men tried to kill a registered citizen, killed an old lady instead. Tell me again why PFML wants to expand the registry?

Parents For Megan’s Law wants the info of level 1 registrants in NY state to register for longer than 20 AND they publish level 1 info in violation of state law. Here is why this is a bad idea– three vigilante thugs killed an elderly woman and left 13 people homeless by starting a fire in an attempt to kill someone on the registry. None of these killers will be on PFML’s website. Full Article

Join the discussion

  1. Rick

    Blame this on the public officials who can care less, sue them for causing the hate that led to the arson and the woman’s death. They will hide behind their official immunity like the cowards they are. They use the law to commit crimes and then hide behind it. What can anyone say anymore, country isn’t to be given one iota of respect, like I’ve said, it’s become a disgusting place, where anything goes, including the so called rule of law that’s completely broken and meaningless. That’s just the way it is.

    20 years for killing one person, could have killed many more. Yup, killing is better than being left alive to these hateful despicable people today. Then when they get out their completely free to live, and travel wherever they want, but pee in public or commit statutory sex acts and your ruined! Only in America, the land of hypocrisy.

  2. Rick

    Oh well, just more collateral damage for them to be proud of.

  3. Robert Curtis

    The registry should be discontinued because of the ease of mess-identification… If it saves just one life from death due to such a messed up mistake it’s worth getting rid of the blasted thing (registry)!

  4. Timmr

    I am not against a measured course, but this is why California needs to lead, and not just adopt a tiered registry like New York. If getting rid of the registry is a long term process, then let us emulate Canada’s no public disclosure registry, and use instances like this as our reasons. Push to have as many exclusions from the Megan’s law website as we can get. That was a good thing California did, have the exclusions, as is PC 290.46 the non discrimination clause. California can lead again, and not just follow. A lifetime on a police only registry may be bad in some ways, but 10 or 20 years on a vigilante hit list looking over your shoulder to see if your neighbor is burning your house down is worse, isn’t it? At least first make it harder for people to access the information, make them again, like in the past, have to go to the police station, give their name and reasons they need to know the address of a registrant. That would put safety, law and order first over mere curiosity and vile intent. Megan’s law is creating lawlessness, contrary to its purpose to protect people. It doesn’t honor the victim in the least.

    • Robert Curtis

      Make online access only available through a local sheriff’s department website via log-in user name and password. That way there’s public access with basic controls in place.

      • Timmr

        They had those protections years ago, when the prospect of vigilante abuse of the registry was but an intuitive likelihood. Now they have proof it is used by vigilantes, the restrictions should be put back in place if they are not going to go as far as eliminate the public registry altogether. Looks like most of these criminals with their previous offenses would not go near a police station to look up a names.

  5. C l a r k

    Proof the states registry incites violence harm injury loss of life discrimination bias segregation prejudice punishment double jeopardy and misinformation.
    There are some in registry wrongful and falsely convicted.
    People in the public sector don’t have address listing for the very same reasons noted above and in the article.
    Families need to sue for BIG $$$$$$$
    the states are liable knowingly what public listing can incite.
    Get some…Get ALLOT $$$$$$$$$$$$$$

  6. nomore

    If it saves one kid (and kills one old lady) it’s worth it!

  7. Punished For Life

    Community notification is both bad for the RC and is bad for the public. Any community notification should come to a halt at once. There are more sick people not on a registry than there will ever be on a registry.

    • Punished For Life

      Parents For Megan’s Law as a organization is a vigilante group of the worst kind. They have no business posting any personal information without that persons consent and should be prosecuted for a violation of the constitutional right to privacy.
      PFML should be held responsible for the death of the elderly woman in the fire. PFML caused the heart attack.

  8. Rick

    I’m wondering why we have holidays anymore. Halloween has been ruined by people who hate others to have fun, Thanksgiving for them is not inviting anyone so they don’t have to share, Christmas is a time to make feel people feel bad about themselves, and new years gives them satisfaction they can do it all again.

    What has happened to this place? So afraid to live, so afraid of what people think, so afraid. I’m waiting for these people to say Jesus and God are sex offenders, lol. Well they created people according to them, and we all carry out God’s will don’t we, lol. You gotta love the so called christians and their political demagogues, they possess such hypocrisy and outright lawful prejudice.

    Oh, but forgive them, theyre only people, yea right. Yea, they love the god that gave them the right to enslave, torture, and discriminate against anyone they want, and nothing has changed that view to them.

    This is their pledge of allegiance, I pledge allegiance to the flag, that allows us the right to decide who is free and who isn’t. A divisive nation, under a fake god, divisible with injustice for everyone. We stand here today dedicated to the proposition, only we decide who and who is not American, we decide what nations have and dont have, we decide what is law and what isn’t at our discretion, what are you going to do about it?

    We stand before you with our lies and you accept them willingly, with your hands out. Less than 1,000 of us and we rule 300 million of you morons. Your a joke. We can pass laws without you even knowing about it, in total secret, and you don’t care. We can steal billions without anyone having to sign for the money and you don’t care. If you think you can stop us, just try it. We will declare martial law and have you legally murdered, you idiots.

    From the Corrupt Congress of the United States to all of you slaves out there.

  9. Rick

    To Timmr

    What do you mean your not against a measured course. You mean you would permit a police only registry where cops get to determine who they will mess with? Police are no better with the info than the public. If dna, fingerprints, forensics, cameras everywhere, conviction websites, eyewitnesses, aren’t enough to prevent or solve crimes, then what is? Soon everyone ones dna will be able to be tracked through familial dna obtained by arrests and convictions. Within 20 years there won’t be anymore serial crimes because they will know who committed the first crime quickly.

    Now if you want to talk about who should and should not get supervised release, I’m all all ears. But there is no debate about registries being allowed under any circumstances, they are illegal, and accomplish nothing. 😎

    • DNA collection web....

      Rick –

      They already do that with DNA….if you don’t have a direct match, you have a potential correlation to a family member and thus a lead in an investigation. In addition, you and others may not be aware of this, but Ancestry.com does DNA analysis and shares that data with the US Government (http://www.naturalnews.com/051773_DNA_database_genealogy_websites_invasion_of_privacy.html). You can see additional sources of this info at the bottom of the article that you and others are encouraged to read.

      Any member of the US Military submits their DNA for the record, which could be used for law enforcement purposes (http://www.councilforresponsiblegenetics.org/geneticprivacy/DNA_mil.html).

      I say this in support of your argument.

      Next thing we will find out about is that babies born who have blood tests done, their DNA will be collected at the same time, catalogued and kept for the same purposes unbeknownst to the unsuspecting public.

      • Robert Curtis

        Strong argument for natural child birth with a midwife. DNA should be give only by consent and never pressured on anyone…even the convicted.

    • Timmr

      I agree, DNA evidence also exonerates people. Just a thought, what safeguards would you put in place to keep the police, prosecutors politicians from tampering with DNA samples, like they tamper with other evidence now?
      Just seems like a good plan to urge everyone to attack the public registry first, because of the obvious harm it does to people listed and people just happening to be nearby. You might just get some allies from that dead grandmother’s relatives and you might have a few more registrants not so afraid to show their faces, have a better chance at employment and so can contribute more, if they are not on the public registry. If you and others can convince SCOTUS or the legislatures in the next year or so, that the whole registry system is illegal and worthless , I wouldn’t complain at all.

      • Rick

        To Timmr

        Well it’s fairly difficult to plant DNA evidence in most cases. Typically photos and video are taken at crime scenes and evidence is supposed to be catalogued. When a DNA sample is taken from someone to compare it to any found at a crime scene, this is usually when DNA can be tampered with. So that’s when important safeguards are necessary, and when officers go to a suspects home they might be able to get hair to plant. But it’s fairly limited when protocols are followed. To me it just makes sense to do the DNA thing. It protects everyone, unless your a lifetime criminal , lol.

        I have never been a fan of crime, I think every person has a right to be safe, and that crime should not receive the benefit of our support. I accept the constitution, and I don’t think it violates the 4th amendment because it only proves you may or may not have been at a crime scene. And it does not prevent you from exercising your legal rights. But they don’t want to do this, they want the power of slavery the registry gives them and political leverage.

        Our entire nation is being driven by criminal politicians. They don’t care about us, they only care about how much money they can drain out of us. Laws that do make sense and save money rarely get passed.

        • Timmr

          Yeah, I don’t have any enthusiasm to argue for or against mandatory DNA sampling right now. It’s all pretty depressing. All I can say is they took it from me, then maybe they should take it from everyone, just like they record your name and sex at birth. If pigs could fly and with the help of DNA, noone should be allowed to get away with even one crime. Black/white, good guy/bad guy, criminal/saint, it is all binary thinking. But they need a name and location to go with that sample they find at the crime scene, or it is just all amino acids in a tube. That is how they justfy the name and location registry, the all knowing eye, to augment the DNA registry. To find you. Bring you in and bind you… For our salvation, a boundary has to be drawn somewhere or there is no telling if you are person or property. Registrants have gone over to the property side. We find ourselves on the wrong side of capitalism as were the slaves before us. Our fluids our thoughts our location now belongs to the state. In some states, you even have to pay for the privilege of being their property.

      • Uniform DNA safeguarding policies...

        Timmr –

        How do you prevent nefarious people using DNA inappropriately or illegally tampering with it? Good question. It is evidence like everything else is unfortunately and has to be safeguarded the same, which is up to the safeguard regulations, rules and polices on hand. If they are not good enough, then review, update and implement.

        DNA does exonerate, but unfortunately the court system takes its own sweet time when you have that to drag it out longer than what is truly needed.

  10. Cool CA RC

    I think this is enough reason to just shut down the registry. It is proven dangerous to be on one.

  11. Eric Knight

    I wonder how many years they would have received had the RC been the victim?

    • d. mccartin

      Another wonder would be how many years they would have gotten if non-white.

      • Rick

        To d. McMartin

        Probably would have gotten life or the death penalty, I’m sure. Guess they wanted to give these three fine white folk a chance to have a life, since the sentences are so light compared to what I’ve seen in other cases similar to it. The judge probably gave them a mitigation circumstance exemption because they were trying to kill an RC. The old lady and 13 other potential victims didn’t seem to matter much.

  12. Rick

    To DNA collection web

    I’m all for DNA collection of every person in the u.s. I advocate it’s collection to prevent repeat and serial offenses. I’m all for the control of crime, but not through registries because they just don’t work. All of these so called concerned people say they care, but won’t permit the collection of DNA to prevent crime, why? I guess they like to let people be harmed by repeat offenders if all types.

    It doesn’t prove you committed a crime, but it lets police know u were there or around a crime scene. Just saying!

    • My DNA is mine.....

      Rick –

      Actually it does not prove you as a person were there or around a crime scene at the time of a crime, but your DNA is/was. Guarantee you, someone wise enough can plant DNA evidence, e.g. hair, finger nails, skin, semen, blood, etc, if they wanted. May sound like science fiction or legal fiction, but don’t assume because your DNA was there, it truly was you who was there.

      By the way, it is not that the folks don’t care about repeated crimes, but they do believe in the freedoms one has in keeping their DNA as theirs and having it submitted with in the legal parameters required by law.

      As for registries and DNA, if everyone had to submit their DNA, then it is for a registry, even if it was not public, because a registry is a catalogue of people registering all of the characteristics for others to refer to when needed. Everyone is then registered for whatever reason the government believes is necessary. Pandora’s box then……

      • Rick

        Good points, and yea DNA has been planted plenty of times, I’m sure. And yes, it would be analogous to a registry, but it is already being used for that purpose, even with the slippery slope application. But the benefits far outweigh the negatives in my personal opinion, I’m just tired of hearing about people who get away and continue to get away with some really messed up crimes because they don’t have DNA on file. I always thought it was illegal to obtain someone’s DNA without their permission, but under public privacy laws that right is virtually non-existent anyways.

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