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DE: ____ charged for refusing polygraph, therapy

When former state Senate hopeful ____ ____ testified at his child rape trial last year, he swore he did not force a youngster to repeatedly have sex with him more than a quarter-century ago. The trial ended in a hung jury.

When he pleaded “no contest” in March to two counts of unlawful sexual contact and was put on probation, ____ didn’t admit to sex crimes, only that he would not fight the state’s accusations.

Authorities have since charged him with violating probation because he has refused to to speak candidly about his crime, both in a lie detector test and group therapy sessions ordered by corrections officials. Full Article

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  1. Margaret Moon

    Whether this politician was guilty or innocent (he pled “no contest”) I agree with him completely regarding his refusal to take a polygraph. I maintain that no ethical mental health professional should have any part of this kind of bogus “treatment.” Supposedly, no one can be prosecuted for anything they say during the polygraph however I have been told that there are two cases before the Supreme Court right now where they did exactly that. And those who thought up this “Containment Model”- and are making big bucks from it- are scared because they may lose the right to use polygraphs!
    I hope and pray the Supreme Court does the right thing and says this is unconstitutional!

  2. Kevin

    What most don’t realize is that the polygraph isn’t used by corrections and treatment professionals to determine the truth. It is designed to intimidate and scare the individual into admitting things they have done, but have yet to disclose. They all know polygraphs are junk science. What they want is the truth and this is one tool they use to get it, although indirectly. A “failed” polygraph might get you some time in county jail, but everyone knows that a judge will never revoke your probation or parole for a failed polygraph.

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