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Emotional Support Group Meetings 2020 (Los Angeles, Sacramento, Phone)

2020 ACSOL Conference – May 29/30 in Los Angeles

Living with 290

Living with 290: U.S. Border Policies and Sex Offense Registration Killed My Love

Three weeks ago, my fiancé’s brother texted me saying that my fiancé, “Eric”, was killed in El Salvador. I cannot express how stunned, sad, and angry I am about my Love’s needless death.

Eric grew up in America after his parents brought him, at age five, to the U.S.A. I was both his kindergarten and third grade teacher. Later, when he was a young man, to my regret and shame, Eric became the underaged so-called “victim” in my sex offense case. My psychologist reported us. I was given a one-year sentence, and I lost my teaching credential. When Eric became older, he couldn’t find work in the United States. He didn’t have a legal U.S. birth certificate, so he went back to his birth country, El Salvador, to get a job and attend college. He wanted to teach English. He also wanted to help youths resist getting into Salvadorian gangs.

I now admit that I thought about Eric obsessively everyday since my 1991 arrest. But I never got in touch with him or his family to find out how he was doing until nearly three decades later. In 2017, I reconnected with Eric through social media. He was happy to hear from me, saying he had also thought about me everyday since my arrest, and still loved me. Since we’d both been divorced more than two years, he asked me to marry him. I made plans to fly to El Salvador by way of Mexico in January 2018.

Even though my case was expunged in 2002, I was not free of nationwide sex offender registration, which is problematic for registrants when traveling, looking for a place to live, and finding work, especially since the advent of online googling. I’d been on the Registry for twenty-seven years, so before my flight, I notified my local police department of my travel plans. Angel Watch, a group intent on preventing registrants from traveling to other countries notified Mexico that I was coming there. So, when I arrived in Mexico City, I was put in a holding tank, and deported back to the United States the following day.

Still wanting to marry Eric, I flew to El Salvador non-stop in March 2018. I worried that I would again be deported, but to my relief and surprise, I was allowed to enter El Salvador and reunite with my long lost Love. Eric and I spent a week together, but in the process of trying to marry, I was told that the issue date on the latest copy of my birth certificate was void. Marriage to foreigners is strictly scrutinized in El Salvador. I also didn’t have current U.S. tax documents with me, so Eric and I couldn’t marry. I came back to to the United States promising I would bring all of those items up-to-date and return, but that never came about. Homeland Security and Angel Watch made sure that I would never be able to return to El Salvador again. My passport was revoked in April 2018. This was so devastating to me, that I seriously wanted to end my life.

During our time apart, Eric was having problems with extortionists, who wanted to control his small restaurant business. When the business was failing and Eric couldn’t pay the extortionists, they sent thugs to beat him up. He made efforts to come to the United States by abandoning his business, and joining the caravans heading towards the U.S. Border. I suggested that he instead go work in San Salvador, and apply for a passport or visa, so he could come to the United States legally. Wounds to his eyes and body from the beatings he took, caused him serious health problems. He found work, but soon he required surgery. We texted one another about his job, his health, about what was going on at the border, and about U.S. policies that were keeping us apart. I wanted to help him financially, but couldn’t because of my own financial problems.

In mid April 2019, I told Eric I’d given up. It was hopeless for us to ever be together again. I was on the Registry, and we would not be allowed to marry each other here in the United States. Even though he had studied 12 years in American schools, he would not be allowed to become a U.S. citizen. I myself had moved on. Eric and I stopped texting one another altogether.

Registration issues not only affected my being with Eric, but affected my being with anyone at all. I went into a very serious depression. I felt that as a Lifetime Registrant, I was never going to be allowed to have the freedom to be in a committed relationship. It was useless for me to even think that in the future I might ever have such happiness. I felt so powerless and sad, I couldn’t imagine I could feel any worse.

Hearing the news about Eric’s murder by a Salvadorian gang devastated me. I felt agonizing loss–loss for someone I deeply loved and loss for the faith I had in humanity and God. Thank goodness family, friends, and 12-Step groups are helping me through this crisis. Emotionally, I am grieving and I am angry.

I want the United States government to know that the Registry destroys lives and is unconstitutional according to the 14th Amendment. It also destroys any hope for decent, law abiding registrants to find jobs, a place to live, to be able to travel, and to reciprocally love whomever they wish to love.

–L Y

Note: To date, LY has been on the Registry for 28 years. In 2021 when CA Tiered Registration Laws go into effect, she will be able to apply for removal. She has wanted to end her life several times, but stays alive for her family–a 96 year-old mother, her grown children, and her grandchildren–relatives, and friends. She also lives for the day she might be free again to travel, and she wants to continue writing and painting her life’s stories.

Photos: Eric’s brother sent LY four photographs: one of the beautiful blue shrine Eric’s mother and brothers erected to Eric, a second photo shows a deceased Eric peacefully laying inside his satin-lined coffin, and the third and fourth are crime photos showing a close-up of Eric’s body stained with his blood from 14 bullet-hole wounds, and one of him laying face down dead by the side of a country road.

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Living with 290 / SO Registration
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  1. Nondescript

    Thank you for sharing this story. It was distressing for me to read – to think about what you have been put through. This story probably echos many others who have been caught in this social engineering experiment by globalists who are under the control of very dark forces. I too am the “ victim” of my husbands “ crime” who has been a registrant for decades. I hope so much that 2021 brings relief for you and you can get at least a part of your life back, even though, sadly, Eric won’t be part of it. Hang in there. You are not alone.

  2. Timmmy

    Why is there no legal action against these unconstitutional passport revocations? If I am not mistaken, the law states the Department of Stated MAY issue a new passport with identifier.

    • Janice Bellucci

      Timmy – We filed not one but two lawsuits challenging the IML. Both were unsuccessful.

      • Joe

        @Janice Bellucci –

        if I understood correctly….

        The second lawsuit was centered on legislative procedure and was denied on the merits. It is dead.

        The first lawsuit, on the other hand, was based on the legal requirements and was rejected (for the time being) due to lack of standing. Because at the time it was filed, no one had their passport revoked, and no one had gotten arrested for failing to provide 21 days advance notice. Both of those circumstances have changed. Passports HAVE BEEN revoked, and people HAVE gotten arrested. It would appear that a, the right plaintiff, certainly would have standing. The lawsuit was dismissed with or without prejudice – I don’t know the difference – but the kind that allows for a re-filing of the original complaint ONCE a plaintiff WITH standing was to bring it.

        Am I understanding this correctly? If so I would hardly call that categorically “unsuccessful”, but premature (which perhaps is correct).

        I would very much appreciate a follow up comment on my train of thought and a correction if necessary. Thank you!!

        • Tim in WI

          @IML CHALLENGE,

          Arrows were launched yes, but at the incorrect target. The same errors were made the initial challengers of Megan’s law.

        • Timmmy

          @Joe. You are quit correct on those two cases. That is why I am asking specifically on the passport revocations. The law says the State Department, may issue a new passport, not revoke it and require the person who already paid for it to pay for another.

          Not to mention there is an issue about due process on these revocations.

          Dismissal with prejudice means it cannot be file again on the merits of the reason filed in first filing.

          Dismissal with without prejudice means it can be filed again when they have met a standard.

          When a case is filed, the court only looks at the issues brought up in the filing.

          I have seen many times cases lost because they brought up the wrong issue in which to fight for.

        • TS

          Timmmy,

          What is the CFR that says the DoS may not revoke a passport?

          Here is the CFR as of this month which states the State Dept may revoke your passport, Title 22 of the CFR which covers passports (Title 22 → Chapter I → Subchapter F → Part 51):

          https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=42ca9fa3f0cb1a87c371ab978ec1da4e&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title22/22cfr51_main_02.tpl

          You may research online that certain unpaid taxes as determined by the IRS can justify passport revocation by the DoS. I make that distinction because the Dept of Treasury and IRS are asking for the passport revocation as a “competent authority”. DoS is not going to do a tax related passport revocation on their own.

          I would think the DoJ is asking for revocation from their systems through the DoS in the same vein; thus, making DoS the bad guy in doing the actual revocation of their document at the request of others who are “competent authorities”. We can debate competent authorities another day.

          I doubt DoS is going to do a passport stamp notification revocation determination because they are not in the DoJ loop to make a determination on whether someone needs a stamped passport because it falls under DoJ’s purview. It could open DoS up to a lot of liability if they had to make the determination on passport stamps, since SORNA is a DoJ program and not DoS, and got it wrong.

          Anyone ever wonder why a standard renewal for a SORNA stamped passport person takes so long? Probably because it needs to be fully vetted by another Dept before the approval to grant a passport is provided. Hence, the expedited fee is very helpful.

          As for due process on the revocations, please see subpart F of the website above.

          Lastly, SORNA related topics are within the website above too.

      • David Higham

        Janice Bellucci,
        I certainly commend you on your work fighting these dum laws but if my memorie is still in tact did you or did you not jump the gun on your lawsuit in both occasions and that is why you lost on both cases.
        I appreciate the work that you do but wouldn’t it be wise to wait before you file a lawsuit so that there is not more bad case law out on the book it only makes it that much more tougher for the next person to challenge these laws.
        I also have not seen to much success from you on these case but that does not feminism the fact that you are still willing to challenge sex offenders laws,if I am mistaken please let me know where your success was because I do not live in California I just follow you three the narsol web site.

  3. Jack

    The author has made several good points. But, it’s not really the registry that prevents that last one. It’s the age of consent as a concept. Which, if you look at the history of it is tied in with the victorian notion that women are property. Young people still are considered that under the law.

  4. David Higham

    Hi LY,
    I was wondering if you have asked the aclu in your state to help you in fighting these sex offenders laws everyone knows that these laws are unconstitutional and after the gundy ruling in the United States supreme court I think you would have a good shot at winning if you go under the retroacting of the Adam Walsh act I think gundy would have won had he used that argument instead of the way he went about it,I feel bad that you had to go three all of this heart ache because of laws that does absolutely does nothing to protect kids or anyone else I have been on the registry for 6years now and I just laugh at it because it is a joke I have asked the aclu in my state to help me right this law but got nowhere,it would probably take a bunch of us to pool our finances to hire a lawyer who would be willing to help us if anyone is interested in doing that I can be reached at highamdav@gmail.com I am willing to put money up with who ever else is willing to if we could get enough people to chip in maybe Brazil could recommend a good lawyer to us so that we can end this nightmare.

    • Harry

      I have contacted the ACLU and basically said, “we are not worth spending their money on”.

  5. G4Change

    So now they are just REVOKING passports???? Janice, or anyone at ACSOL, is this actually happening???

    Maybe now the federal courts will think things are RIPE enough for a lawsuit. This makes me sick!!!!

    • Aj

      @G4Change:
      “So now they are just REVOKING passports????”
      —–
      Ummm…haven’t you been following along? Numerous people on here have reported getting the “Dear John” after returning home from international travels. It’s then off to re-apply to get one with a special endorsement–though some report the new book not having such.

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