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ME: This sex assault victim says the offender registry listing is more important to her than prison time

For Tina Dionne, it’s more important for the man who sexually assaulted her as a child to register as a sex offender than serve time in prison. Full Article

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  1. New Person

    This is why registration is cruel and unusual punishment because of the following quote from the article, “The sex offender registry helps people be aware of what people like him have done. They can’t just take off to another state and start over. That has to follow them.”

    The inability to start over again. This is why many of us are depressed because there is no relief to start over again after paying your dues to society. There is no escape.

    • Will A

      There is an escape. You must completely stop giving a rat’s ass what other people think of you. It is very liberating. You only need to be civil to people who are civil to you.

  2. kelnothiding

    so punish them for ever is better than prison , the Reg would not of helped her at all , offend the offender there whole life ? no matter what this poor lady thinks , the fact remains that most of us do time and paper for punishment , and get more punishment after that ,, for Life , right along with our family , and every year its just another trick bag for us , people Killing us , burning us out , threats to the wife and kids , people trying to set us up , if she don’t care about my family and our safety and our right to move on in life , then not move on in her life use the REG as some kind of a crutch , I am sorry I just cant see why anyone should care if she just refuses to move on in life , just like all of the hell we go through in prison and in life after prison , and just want to heal , TO Heal!!! not to go reoffend , Move On , no one is keeping her from moving on , no one is standing in front of her house with a sack gummy bears , and if there is she could call the law!Its got to where folks don’t want to watch there kids , they just want to kick them out the door and let them run , in the real world bad things happen when you don’t take resposabilty for them selfs or the kids , making a bunch of laws will fix nothing , on the other hand we do have stalkers at our house , and in our lifes as well , we have to live with the dangers in our life , as well as being blocked from where we can live that WE feel are safe from many things” not just the gummy bear vender , dangers that are not on some darn web site , like drive by shootings , our kids just playing on the porch and get hit by a stray bullet , or we all could be the target , but we are not good enough to live in your stupid gated community , we don’t rate , the judgment never ends !

  3. There is a drunk driving registry...

    …in the state of Ohio (https://ext.dps.state.oh.us/omvi/)

    Welcome to Ohio’s Habitual Offender Registry, a database of people who have been convicted at least five times of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, and meet certain other criteria established by law.

    You can search the Registry using any one (or more) of the above search boxes. For example, you can search by last name only, or by county only. Or you can refine your search by filling in multiple search parameters.

    A state law adopted in September 2008 established the Registry, and defined who should be included:

    •Anyone with five or more convictions during the past 20 years (at least one of the convictions must be since the law took effect on September 30, 2008).

    •The Registry does not include convictions more than 20 years old.

    •The Registry does not include deceased people.

    •The Registry does not include out-of-state convictions.

    •Juvenile offenses are included.

    •If a single incident results in multiple impaired driving-related convictions, it is counted as one conviction for purposes of this Registry.

    The Registry is compiled from information Ohio courts report to the Ohio Department of Public Safety and will be updated monthly. Click here to see Ohio Revised Code 5502.10, which established the Registry. Click here to see a complete list of offenses that are considered drunken driving-related for purposes of this Registry.

    • Nicholas Maietta

      You can also simply select a county and hit “Search” to get a list.

      Because i do data mining professionally, i was able to quickly interface with this to pull down a list of names from all counties within seconds. I could automate this and place ads on the resulting pages created from my compiled database. I could provide this database as an RSS feed, push to Twitter for new names appearing in database, or even provide a service where people in their neighborhood who appear on the list will trigger an email and text notice alerting them of the offender registering in or out of their neighborhood.

      This is simple stuff for me, i’m not evil like Rodrick and others like Mugshots. The irony here is that i don’t make squat because i’m on the registry, but i prob could make a few bucks an hour or so just on this database alone. Maybe i ought to build out the service and funnel the money from this registry to fight registries instead?

      Now THERE’s an idea.

    • Frank

      As much as I disapprove of registries of any kind, this may be good news for us. Eventually, if we register everyone who makes mistakes of any kind, it will eventually overwhelm the system. Which actually could work to our benefit.

      Don’t you think it’s a good idea to notify destination countries of travelers who are habitual drunks or drug abusers. In my opinion, drunks are a much higher risk of causing difficulties for the host country than someone who drank 25 years ago…committed a sex offense… and since quit drinking and has not re-offended.

      Drunks should not be allowed to rent a car. Drunks should not be allowed to purchase alcohol. They need an “Identifier”. They should be required to register…even every 90 days if they are really bad drunks and give a 21 day notification of travel. Then let’s see if this in not punishment. My guess is it would add a new few million to the registries.

      Oh wait. Judges, Attorney’s and Law Enforcement Officers all drink. But they control it. Just ask them. There was a Judge in a CA. Court system who had a open bottle of booze in his pocket…even while passing judgment on the lawbreakers in his court. Inside information directly from my attorney 28 years ago.

      I wonder if anyone has ever been real drunk and realized they had done something they didn’t want anyone to know about. I think anyone who has ever over-indulged has been there. It can get you jail or prison time and life on a registry. But it’s not punishment. Right?

      • Timmr

        The present system discriminates against former offenders and former victims. I am sure if my kid got killed by a drunk driver, someone who cared so little for others that he got in a car incapacitated, I would be damaged for life losing my child. I still would not want this person shamed for life, but what evidence is there that only victims of some type of illegal sex — illegal I say, because not all of it is abuse — get to declare that an offender and their family should be harmed for life and others do not? If it is suppose to be justice for some then apply it to all.

  4. Erwin

    “I grew up in a time when you didn’t deal with sexual abuse — you swept it under the rug,” she said. “I have been very open with my own children.”

    This woman is only 33 years old. She acts like she grew up in the 50s or something when in fact, she was victimized by her uncle in the 90s when she was 10. Maybe her family swept the abuse under the rug, but overall society stopped long before that.

    I don’t know why some younger people just like to repeat catch phrases & colloquial expressions that don’t even apply to their situation

    • Timmr

      And I am not sure how you can be “dealing with sexual abuse” by looking at the registry, especially when that stranger you find is the least likely to abuse your children. Sounds like she is looking the other way from where sexual abuse happens and teaching her children to do the same. Essentially it is just more sweeping it under the rug, where the registry serves as the rug.

  5. Erwin

    “Dionne has used the registry to see how close sex offenders live to her. She told her children to avoid a neighbor after East Millinocket police notified residents in January 2015 that a registrant who had been convicted of possessing child pornography was living in their neighborhood”

    That does not pass the smell test. Mere possession of CP is a for the most part is a tier 1 offense where police don’t notify the public. If the state of Maine follows the federal guidelines, they only warn the public when high risk offenders move into the area. Either Dionne is lying or her neighbor had done more than possess CP

    • JR

      Erwin,

      Florida doesn’t use a tiered system. You catch a charge and you’re on the registry for life.

      We also have civil commitment here. No escape.

      • Erwin

        Got it
        We have a tier system here in Wisconsin and possession of CP is considered a level one offense. Registration is 15 years. Level 1’s still have to register but there’s no community notification. Civil commitment is only for what the state calls “violent” level 3 offenders. And what’s bizarre is the state just passed a law allowing the DOC to override local restrictive ordinances in order to place high risk civilly committed released offenders back into the community. But other offenders convicted lesser crimes like voyeurism are still restricted and banned from towns which have restrictive RSO ordinances.

    • Malcolm

      Erwin,

      California also does not have a tiered system. Possession of CP will get you life time registration and a free listing on the state site complete with picture and personal information. Perhaps Maine has added their own caveats to what kind of notifications are performed above and beyond SORNA.

      • Erwin

        Just curious……does law enforcement do community notification in California for low level offenses like possession of CP or voyeurism?

        • Malcolm

          Erwin,

          To my knowledge they do not do community notifications for any offense.

        • Timmr

          If you move into a new neighborhood the law enforcement has the option of notifying the residents. There are no rules for when this happens as far as I know, at least no laws regulating how this is to be done.
          The local sheriff sent out fliers when I moved back into the house. I don’t know what level I would be in another state, in Washington it looks like I would be a level one, but in the California tiered registry proposal it looks like I would be a level two. When states can’t agree on a format for this registry — they all have access to the same studies — that is a sign it is all BS. A good program based on empirical knowledge is the highway system. You travel from state to state and although some roads are not well maintained and others are, the roads themselves are built to the similar standards.

  6. BJ

    Erwin said: “I don’t know why some younger people just like to repeat catch phrases & colloquial expressions that don’t even apply to their situation”

    Why? Because it takes a lot more effort to think for yourself!
    cheers,
    B

  7. Agamemnon

    A victim literally goes on the record to state that the registry is the most important factor for them in regards to the conviction of their abuser, yet the registry still isn’t considered to be a punishment?

  8. ab

    Irrational beliefs allow detachment from responsibility in resolving one’s own troubles.

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