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California

Sex Offender Board Calls For Registry Overhaul

California is one of four states that require lifetime registration of all sex offenders. The current registry holds close to 100,000, a number the California Sex Offender Management Board says is too large to handle. The board is recommending an overhaul of the system that would change the criteria for lifetime registration, taking into account the severity of the crime and the likely risk posed by the offender. Radio Program

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  1. someone who cares

    Another “common sense” article. We are supposed to be so advanced, so why is it taking so long to catch up and realize how unconstitutional and wrong the SO registry is. Like many comments on this article mentioned, if they need registries, there should be registries for car jackers, burglars, domestic violence offender, etc etc. That would really make a huge mess and will most likely not happen. There should be justice for all, and no registry or a registry for all. Innocent family members are stripped of their constitutional rights since they can’t live with their loved ones the way they should be entitled to. They, too, have rights. The registry needs to end altogether, and keeping track of the truly dangerous offenders should be left to law enforcement. It is time to admit how wrong all this and start making changes. People’s rights are being violated here. It has to end!

    • NPS

      Someone mentioned that there was a possibility that politicians were waiting for the board to act since their positions are not threatened by voter backlash. If those in Sacramento had pushed this forward, it could mean losing the next election. As we all know politicians work for their own careers; not for the will of the people.

      My private therapist, who also works in sex offender treatment programs, is very optimistic that the state will be moving toward a tiered registry before the end of the decade. Reading these recent articles and the radio program above is giving me a lot of hope that indeed the state is headed that way.

    • Q

      Someone who cares:

      I think one of the biggest hindrances to a tiered registry ever going anywhere is the fact that the public is allowed access to offender information and in many cases people like Marc Klaas are viewed as experts on the issue; which they are not. I was hit head on by a drunk driver and almost killed, and I was offended, upset and a host of other emotions, but that doesn’t make me an expert on drunk drivers and the people that drink too much and commit these crimes. Until these sensationalist victim’s group advocates and self serving politicians stop pulling made up fact’s out of thin air with nothing to back their claims up I don’t think much is going to happen to change anything because most people are either too busy or don’t want to check the fact’s out for themselves. It’s an election year and this tiered registry seem to be getting more attention than in the past, but I think the majority of politicians fear this issue because they fear they may be looking for a job if they support a tiered registry.

  2. Q

    As long as people like Marc Klaas are allowed to have a say on this issue and be treated as some sort of an expert, an unbiased dialog can never happen, be it on the radio or in the halls of power. I think Marc Klaas and his supporters, like the caller La Donna would do well to read the constitution and the bill of rights, and then read it again. The caller from Placerville hit the nail on the head when she called Megan’s law a lie and stated that it did nothing to protect her child from the person, who wasn’t on the list, that molested her child. Dr Tubin is definitely fighting a uphill battle that (I hope I’m wrong) probably isn’t going to go very far. I stated in other threads that I think this is election year BS and I still believe that.

    In the book “A parallel universe,” Alex Landon and Elaine Halleck p132 ¶3 it’s states “A state attorney general should be several notches above such victim organizations, but unfortunately in one case, he was not. In his 2000 report on Megan’s law, Former California attorney general Bill Lockyer claimed “convicted sex offenders are among the most likely criminals to re-offend and create new victims.” It’s sad the number of politicians that sound more like members of victims groups than public servants sworn to uphold certain principals, like the constitution and the bill of rights doesn’t seem to be getting any smaller.

    In the same book “A parallel universe,” Alex Landon and Elaine Halleck p132 ¶2 Marc Klaas is quoted as stating “There is not one documented case of a pedophile ever having been cured” and “It’s a… fact that whenever a sexual deviant is anonymously released into the community, the probability is virtually guaranteed that the offender will revert to deviant behavior.” I find this statement, as well as the former attorney general’s statement rather odd when I consider that both these statement’s have been proven to be grossly inaccurate; but then again, who in Sacramento isn’t so afraid of looking bad and damaging their career to listen?

    • G4Change

      I would LOVE the opportunity to debate Mark Klaas. I’d like to ask him: what if his daughter’s perpetrator was on the public registry? Then what? What would it have done? Nothing! This guy was a predator who could only be stopped by bars and barbed wire!
      Just like with Jessica Lunsford…her perpetrator was on the public registry. It did nothing!
      I’ll tell you what the over-bloated registry did do for Jaycee Dugard…it facilitated her torture and abuse for years because authorities were too swamped keeping track of teenage lovers and party streakers to invest the time needed to thoroughly and diligently watch that animal Phil Garrido! Why do you think the State of California was so quick to pay Dugard $20 Million???? Because they knew they f’ed up!
      YES, Q, the caller who calls Megan’s Law a lie hit it right on the head! The politicians all sold it to us as if it were a panacea to this problem. It has been anything BUT that. Now, it’s making it worse!
      Mr. Klaas didn’t even belong on that show because NOBODY who did what was done to his daughter would ever be considered to be free again let alone let off the list. I wonder if Mark Klaas actually still believes his own b.s. because less and less of the public do.

      • Tim

        20 million. Maybe it should have been more. Just what is the incentive to prevent the most horrendous crimes? No one wants to see such horrible crimes happen, but after they do I wonder why law enforcement isn’t saying what you say: hey let’s stop applying our resources on those we hate and start applying it on those who we have reason to fear. Instead, after the high profile crime, the laws become more expansive and more money expended on what doesn’t work. It’s a vicious cycle that may grow the police force, but does it extend public safety? I haven’t seen any evidence from the proponents of Megan’s laws that it has.

        • Q

          Tim:
          I think $20 million was way too much because it never should have happened in the first place. Each and every time a registrant gets arrested for committing a new sex crime is another documented case that proves the registry is nothing more than trash legislation. Worthless, ineffective and a waste of time and money. And the numbers prove that the vast majority of registrants are law abiding citizens that made a mistake. Who among those that hate us is perfect and without blemish? I think the ones the public should fear are those that believe the lie and push for further legislation that is contrary to the constitution and bill of rights. Those are the dangerous ones. Those are the ones that are traitors to this country and the principals that once made us great.

      • Q

        G4Change:

        I’d love to see you debate Marc Klaas too. I’ll bet after you asked him what the registry would have done to save his daughter if the perpetrator was a registrant he would probably say if the perpetrator was a registrant his daughter wouldn’t have been killed. At which point you would bring up Jaycee Dugard and point out how much and for how long the registry utterly failed her in every way, shape and form imaginable; not to mention the $20 million that went down the toilet at the taxpayers expense along with the rest of the $$$$ that goes down the toilet each year for an obviously ineffective registry that has never saved “just one child” or prevented anything.

        I’m still waiting for someone to produce irrefutable proof that one child, or adult for that matter, has ever been saved or helped by the registry or any of the associated laws. I’d like to see proof that the registry and any of the laws that go along with it have ever prevented anything. I’m not holding my breath for obvious reasons. There isn’t one documented instance that I’ve ever seen where anyone can point to the registry and say beyond a shadow of doubt that because of this registry this child, or adult, was saved from a crazed, deranged sexual deviant. This will never happen because this strategy of placing as many people as possible on the registry for life and allowing anyone and everyone to access your personal information has never worked because it was never intended to be used the way it’s now used.

        All anyone has to do is look at what the registry has produced and if they have the IQ of a chimpanzee they should be able to see that the only results have been destroyed lives of men and women, many of them with valuable skills, the lives of children ruined because people like Marc Klaas think if our personal information is accessible to everyone that this will somehow prevent something, many murders and assaults of people who paid their debt to society and countless property crimes, as well as a public that by and large lives in fear of what amounts to nothing more than the boogeyman.

        • steve

          Hell what about mark gardner another one who slipped thru the cracks because they are watching the wrong people.

        • Q

          steve:

          I looked for information on that case and I found nothing. What I did find was allot of people named mark gardner on various state registries; all by some outfit called homefacts. They probably need to be sued now some precedents have been set in the offendex/soar archives case.

        • Tim

          Hey. Wasn’t he on parole and wearing a GPS? How long did it take to connect the dots?Time enough for him to make it a double murder.

        • Q

          Tim:

          BINGO!!! It was the mention of GPS that did the trick. This guy was from your neck of the woods and did his deeds in that area too. According to this article this case played a part in getting Megan’s law passed. He was on GPS until 2 weeks prior to the murders.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Albert_Gardner

        • steve

          Yo9u mean Chelsea’s Law…

        • Tim

          In the public perception, these murders loom grossly large on the landscape, and understandably so for the survivors who are suffering through the loss. Nonethelees, the flip side of that reality is that there has been thousands if not millions of acts of kindness, love and lifesaving that has gone on in the same time frame. One good thing to have been in a group therapy is to have witnessed the redemption of many fellow ex offenders.

        • Q

          Steve:

          Uhhhh; Chelsea’s law. There’s so friggin many of them it’s hard to keep track. I stand corrected.

        • JAH

          The guys name was John Gardner III, just looked it up.

  3. Tim

    Get all the streakers, public urinators , kids who have sex with their girl friends off the registry now. I don’t believe these acts should even be crimes. Only shows how prudish this so called modern culture has become.Then we can discuss what is truly a crime and who truly needs reparations and who truly needs punishment, therapy, what program is appropriate to deal with it, without having all this frack taking up valuable time.

    • Q

      Tim:

      I think if we got rid of the morality police it would go far in solving many of this society’s problems.

      • Tim

        Poway has its share of sick murders. This, the earlier Westerfield murder of the 5 year old, and back in the 70’s the cop who pulled over and murdered Karen Knott. All within a few miles. I suppose you can pick any area of the country and find they have had their share of sickos.

        • Q

          Tim:

          Wow! San Diego County paid Westerfield’s attorneys $304,500 to defend him.
          http://legacy.utsandiego.com/news/metro/danielle/

          The cop’s tab was $756,000!!!!!
          http://legacy.utsandiego.com/news/metro/danielle/20030222-9999_2m22wester.html

          I thought the registry and all the other laws was supposed to make cases like this easier and cost effective. Oh!, that’s right! He wasn’t a registrant!

          Craig Peyer of the CHP murdered Cara Knott in 1986, was convicted and sentenced to 25 ti life. He has been denied parole in 2004, 2008 and 2012. he won’t be eligible for parole again until 2027, and I’ll bet he wont have to register as a sex offender if he ever get’s out.

  4. Robert Curtis

    The registry should be publicly accessed only through a local sheriff’s department by the requester giving their ID information. The only time someone is on the registry is while they are on probation or parole. Why is there probation and parole? To ensure for a period of time (usually 3 to 5 years) that the ex-convict is safe for society and abides by strict requirements of accountability and therapy. After such time they should be reconstituted back into society. To do otherwise is simply wrong. As it stands with the sex offender registry these people can never be truly reconstituted back into society. TRUTH

    • Tim

      Hmm. Punishment for a specified amount of time based on the crime and evidence surrounding it, reasonable restitution, then a transition period so that the ex offender can reintegrate into society, and regain citizenship, that sounds like the Bill of Rights.

  5. Robert Curtis

    There is an unintended consequence to having an extremely punitive sex offender registry and that is most offenses are committed by family members and those know to the victim. By the registry being punitive against families and not just to individuals doesn’t it seem logical that victims will not report abuses in order to protect their family as a whole? So, the punitive nature of the registry by default becomes it’s own worst enemy.

    • j

      Under these particular conditions and with the law’s disregard for specific sentencing guidelines which mitigate risk and articulate specific guidelines for family reintegration, the family needlessly and repeatedly gets punished as a whole while still trying to heal from the initial damage.

      The victim can easily be identified by this information as well, which is an unintended circumstance of the law.

      Purveyors of these laws and others vigilante groups have implicitly denied the constitutional rights of innocent family members while misusing this information.

      The family must manage the incursion of this law and the disdain and negative effects they encounter publicly while attempting to negotiate the guilt by association syndrome that is inevitably placed upon them in virtually every aspect of their lives. These are other unintended circumstances of this law.

      This most likely leads to ongoing healing and and closure issues for the victim as well – as they are harmed anew and witness the entire family unit disintegrate with unnecessary revelation of decades old information subject to public misuse and gross misinterpretation and exaggeration of any specific danger.

      It loads another burden on the victim since the family must somehow have collective dignity while under public scrutiny and disdain. Many school age children have needlessly been targeted, excluded, ridiculed, ostracized, bullied and victimized due to their relationship to the registrant. There are similar social punishments placed upon other family members of any age.

      The collective damage to the victim and the family far outweighs the need for a “One Size Fits All” solution. This is certainly where necessary remedial focus of and reforms to this law should occur while keeping the health and well being of the victim and family members (which are the victims’ support structure) in the forefront.

  6. steve

    Hey as long as this is being discussed it’s a very good sign.

    • Q

      Steve:

      I’ll bet we in this thread are talking about it more than any lawmakers ever will.

  7. Bruce

    Hey everyone this Guy was Burned in court By a Judge on a property issue but He is ON this Judge Like Glue Check This OUT!!!http://beforeitsnews.com/blogging-citizen-journalism/2014/04/facebook-this-are-rape-case-trials-totally-rigged-the-conspiracy-missed-by-anonymous-2452770.html?currentSplittedPage=0

    • Q

      Bruce:

      If it is indeed true, I’m not surprised at all. Just look at the supreme court; Sh**T does run downhill, after all.

  8. BSL

    Someone commented in the full article. “It was a myth that people the pee in public are not likely put on the list unless a child saw them. I was. Two adults saw me. I have been labeled Sex Offender for life. In my county 2 counts of sexual offences is needed to prosecute and place on the list. They got two nearby adults to come forward and agree they saw me. Based on that they had me write apology letters. I felt really bad and embarrassed so I did it. Then, I was told later they would be submitted as “Confessions X 2” The DA in my county was just elected in 1994 and that’s the year Megan’s law was passed so they were in a rush to start filling the registry. There was another guy riding around on a bicycle exposing himself to teens and they hadn’t caught him yet. They asked me if I had a bicycle and did I do this too. I told then no, I had only done this a few times. I actually had just stopped doing drugs and was drinking a lot of beer. I started pissing in public and didn’t care about my behavior at the time. The DA. did not believe that I had only done this a hand full of times and with the idiot riding around on the bike and not getting caught, he went forward with conviction. I was so embarrassed and had no idea it would lead to this and I told him I was ashamed and agreed I had a problem and needed help. I went to counseling for about 3 months and the consoler told my probation officer that I was not a sexual predator or had the propensity to ever offend again. I was released off probation and counseling early as the judge was impressed with what the counselor had to say about me. I went back to my probation officer for the last time and he said, “Oh by the way”, “have you registered with the local police as a sex offender?” “It says here in your record that you must register for the rest of your life!” I was so broken down about it. I did not understand why me of all people? There were no children involved, I thought Megan’s law was about Child predators and molesters! 20 years later, still alive and fighting urges of suicide, I’m hopeful that I can finally be freed from this un walled public prison. I live in a small town, If I go to the local college to take a class, I have to report as a sex offender. Someone I know that works in administration says one thing and everyone knows. I can’t live or buy a house near a school because I urinated in public 3 or 4 times over 20 years ago!

  9. malai

    California registered sex offender is a joke. They take individuals whom have never been in trouble or even committed a sex offense and throw them on there. My husband of 20 years had a very jealous ex-wife that went above and beyond to destroy our lives. This was roughly 20 years ago. We have not been able to rent in some places, he has lost jobs, communities look at us like we are sick people. I hate our system for this. He had terrible representation and was not aware of what he was signing in fine print. We took all proper steps of getting it expunged, even had to get a certificate of rehabilitation as if he was a rapist. Sent packets to our Governor, president and city counsel to be removed from the internet and having to register. Even the officer at our cities registry said, “it makes no sense why you are even registering.” She even helped my husband put the packet together. We have gone to lawyers who all have said, ” the case makes no sense, and there were many loop holes in it”. Meanwhile our lives have been pure hell for a tier 1 offender, who never has been to prison. The judge never mentioned in court anything about registering he didn’t know he had to register until he went to his probation officer. I thought the Sex offender registry was for Actual sex crimes against women and children. In the United States of America, you are guilty until you can pay for your innocence, If you are poor and Hispanic you are at the governments disposal. Not to mention this all went down the same time the O.J. trial was going on. If I could just tell you the hell and the humiliation I go through and NO one cares or will help. Come to find out every county gets so much money for every person registered. If you are rich you can get away with anything. I have no trust in our system, nor does my family. I always explain to people the situation and they relax. You can even get death threats just for even being associated as offender.By the way haven’t been in trouble ever sense. Married happily been together 20 years, with 2 beautiful children. I want to bring legal action against the county of Ventura, for defamation of character and poor legal representation, not to mention pain and suffering.

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